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Posts Tagged ‘Doritos’

14 PR and Social Media Winners from Super Bowl XLVIII

superbowl2That was a boring Super Bowl in every way. Not only was the game itself a blowout, but most of the ads were lackluster and no brand recreated Oreo’s breakout success on social.

Still, a few companies and personalities did manage some clever nuggets, which we will now review.

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STUDY: Doritos, M&M’s and More Score Perception Bumps with Super Bowl Previews

You may have heard that there’s a sporting event coming up this Sunday and that every brand in the world wants to make the most of it.

Everyone in the PR/marketing/advertising world wondered whether this year’s decision to allow the public to watch full ads before the game would help the brands that participated, and a new survey from our friends at YouGov confirms that it did, indeed.

Doritos is the top “improver” in all three of the study’s categories: word-of-mouth, online buzz and, most importantly, purchase consideration. While YouGov notes that Doritos included kids and animals in three of its whopping five ”Crash the Super Bowl” ads, researchers credit this brilliant spot for the bounce:

OK, that was pretty good. More winners after the jump:

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Hempfest Doritos Get PR Buzz from eBay Exposure

Readers of this blog are familiar with the Seattle Police Department’s excellent PR initiative to protect and serve the public by reaching out to stoners during the 2013 Hempfest celebration. The event was held after the passage of I-502, a law which made it legal to possess up to one ounce of pot in Washington.

Most of the public thought the story of how the police handed out free bags of Doritos that promoted acceptable stoner behavior to Hempfest participants would have simply had a good laugh and then fallen asleep in a bathtub with yesterday’s news. But this branding party just won’t die.

In true stoner creativity, and perhaps laziness, those same bags of Doritos have begun appearing on eBay, and are selling for up to $55 a bag. That’s right. You can buy a bag, of Doritos, from your stoner friends for $55 online. It appears that the police and the public alike believe this unprecedented attempt at outreach to a once a fringe element is a classic PR strategy. And it is. Read more

The PR Police Power of Self-Awareness During a Pot Festival

Effective PR requires two critical elements: knowing your audience and the ability to accept reality. Too often brands, celebrities and companies misidentify customer sentiment and lose any opportunity to create good will by being tone deaf, arrogant, or dishonest. (Or, in the case of Lance Armstrong, all three.)

So kudos to the Seattle Police Department, which—as we reported last week—implemented a uniquely audience-specific, creative and realistic Twitter campaign in anticipation of last weekend’s very public Hempfest. The celebration came on the heels of a ruling that legalized marijuana in the state of Washington last fall.

Knowing the penchant stoners have for snack foods, the Seattle Police Department handed out 1,000 free bags of Doritos sporting stickers informing participants that they shouldn’t drive while high or give weed to minors and—oh yeah—don’t forget to have fun, either. This isn’t polished marketing Geico green lizard PR. This is true public relations outreach. Here is the message the Seattle PD conveyed: We get you. Read more

Friday Munchies: Seattle PD Gives Free PR to Frito-Lay at ‘Hempfest’

Boy oh boy, those sure do look like Scooby snacks.

Frito-Lay—or, more specifically, Dorito’s—received a bit of free viral PR this week via an unlikely source: the Seattle Police Department.

On Saturday the city will host its annual “Hempfest”, a gathering of like-minded people dedicated to making rope, oils and clothing from the world’s most naturally resistant fiber (we kid, we kid). Cops surveying the festival plan to hand out 1,000 bags of munchies in what the department is honestly calling “Operation Orange Fingers”. Said bags will each bear stickers urging attendees to visit the department’s Marijwhatnow page for more details of the 2012 laws which legalized simple possession of that one thing in Washington State.

We would mention that they’ll also arrest anyone found possessing more than the legal amount of weed or trying to drive while under the (obvious) influence, but we wouldn’t want to harsh your buzz. We’re more amused by the department’s Twitter responses:

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Maker’s Mark Miracle: Best PR Disaster Ever Engineered

We all remember just a few short months ago when Maker’s Mark announced plans to water down its product to accommodate demand. It was an unmitigated public relations disaster. Diluting the bourbon was tantamount to halting production altogether. The brand had given up on its values, heritage and customers. R.I.P. Maker’s Mark, right?

Not quite. The result was a public relations bonanza. Upon hearing the breaking news in February, fans of Maker’s Mark began hording the product, rocketing sales up by 44 percent. By the time the dust had settled Marker’s Mark had very publicly reversed its decision and enjoyed the benefits of widespread, free publicity. We have to say, nice work Marker’s Mark PR team.

Whether the decision to water down Marker’s Mark was a sincere proclamation or very clever publicity stunt, well, we’ll have to leave that to industry conspiracy theorists—this all HAD to be planned, right? Conspiracy! Conspiracy! Conspiracy!

It is simply inconceivable that a brand so PR savvy, so knowledgeable of its products and customers, so in line with its own promise of quality, would consider watering down its bourbon. That would be like Taco Bell selling tacos in Doritos shells… oh, wait a minute. That would be like Budweiser putting water in its… no wait. That would be like Porsche building its exhaust system using Honda parts (no offense, Honda, I lost control of this analogy a few sentences ago and needed a way out).

Though Maker’s Mark no longer has any intention to water down its product, it should breathe a sigh of relief as this hubbub is now part of the brand’s storied history. As the saying goes, it’s better to be lucky than good. If this was an honest mistake, then Maker’s Mark was very lucky. If this was all a PR strategy, then Maker’s Mark was very good. No, they were great.

Doritos Creates Tweet-Powered Stage for SXSW

DoritosWe recently told you about the success of Hot Wheels’ tweet-powered vending machine, and speculated as to what sort of real-world device would be powered by customers’ tweets next, but even we hadn’t thought of this

To kick off its first ever global ad campaign “For the Bold”, Doritos has taken the concept to the next level (or maybe even the level beyond that) by building a 62-foot-tall, tweet-powered concert stage designed to look like a giant vending machine at SXSW.

The high-tech platform will take tweets featuring the hastag #BoldStage and use them as real-time concert controls. This means that viewers can harness their unprecedented power to choose the show’s opening act, handpick the set list, control the special effects, and send pictures of themselves rocking out directly to the four-story screen in the arena (all with only a 9.6-second lag time).

Sounds a little crazy, no?

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Top 10 Social Media Moments of Super Bowl XLVII

You’ve heard the news: Super Bowl 47 was all about social. While the TV ratings for last night’s game were higher than the year before, the audience’s social activity/engagement numbers more than doubled. The “Brand Bowl” confirmed something we already knew: social now plays a bigger role in the marketing/advertising/PR equation than ever before–and its influence will surely continue to grow.

Need evidence? Here are our 10 favorite social media moments from last night’s big game.

1. Oreo’s on-the-fly branding spot: Is it obvious? Yes. But there’s a reason people are still flipping out over Oreo and 360i‘s incredible acts of branding.

2. Budweiser‘s “Name that Clydesdale” campaign: This one was a slow burn strategy win. Bud was very wise to start the hype early by leaking videos and encouraging fans to get involved.

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Adventures in Marketing: Doritos and Taco Bell, BFFs

Dorito's Taco BellWe usually love the idea of two complementary brands coming together and doing great things, but when we first heard about the ongoing collaboration between Doritos and Taco Bell, we were a little skeptical.

We understand that these leaders in the “corn-based foods with ridiculously high levels of saturated fat” market appeal to the same audiences (namely drunk college kids and adults in a rush), but we wondered if a taco served inside a big Dorito dusted with nuclear red “cheese” would be a little too much.

We were very, very wrong: The Doritos Locos Tacos quickly became the best-selling item in the history of the Tex-Mex chain, which got mouths watering again this week with a Facebook post sort of announcing the pending release of the Cool Ranch version. We still can’t quite get over the fact that this simple post got 120,000 likes, 11,500 shares, and more than 8,000 comments.

The Huffington Post recently attempted to discern exactly why this co-branding exercise worked so well, and we have to agree with most of their points:

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Johnson & Johnson Walks the PR Tightrope on Toxic Chemicals

If you’ve ever read the label on the package of any sort of processed food, you’ve undoubtedly encountered a whole host of unpronounceable, unrecognizable chemicals–so it’s really no surprise that discussions about organic practices, GMOs, and the current state of our food production/distribution system have been building steam over the past several years.

But in these increasingly health-and-environment-conscious times, consumers are growing more concerned not just with what they put in their bodies, but also what they put on their bodies. Chances are, the label on your shampoo bottle is just as unsettling as the label on your cereal box. With this in mind, several specialty lines of self-care products like Origins, Murad and others have taken full advantage of the trend toward natural ingredients, building their brands by boasting about the ingredients not included in their products.

Now, Johnson & Johnson, which makes a wide range of personal care products including everything from its famous baby shampoo to familiar drugstore brands like Neutrogena, Aveeno, and Clean & Clear, has announced that it will be phasing out harmful chemicals from its products by 2015, and from several of its baby products by 2013.

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