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Posts Tagged ‘Fashion Week’

3 Reasons Fashion Week Is the Worst for PR

If your job in PR touches on fashion in any way, you’ll appreciate this post from the Fashionista blog. Here are the three reasons writer Lauren Sherman gives for hating on Fashion Week as a PR pro and event organizer:

  1. Fake ticket requests: everybody and their third cousin twice removed wants in on the hot shows, and anyone who works in fashion PR will know how pathetically obvious these requests can be—especially on the day of the event. It’s like you’re a virtual doorman or something.
  2. Event crashers: You’re a real-life doorman, too. No matter how carefully you check the RSVP list, some jackass will always try to worm his or her way into the crowd. Such individuals are usually far too desperate to worry about embarrassing themselves, so you might have to work with security to contain and/or eject them.
  3. Complainers: Not only does everyone want to attend the show, they also want the VIP experience. Some journalists and other personalities just can’t seem to accept the fact that they aren’t quite front-row material, so you might have to let them know, in the nicest possible way, that their blog just isn’t as influential as they’d like to think. Physical confrontations are rare, but they do happen—just ask HL Group‘s Lynn Tesoro about last year’s Zac Posen show.

Do we agree? Do we have more reasons to list?

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Fashion and Instagram: The Beginning of a Beautiful Friendship

An industry driven by the power of instant visual impressions has found a natural partner in the app that’s all about capturing the moment and passing it along to the rest of the world.

The growing partnership between fashion and Instagram almost makes too much sense: for example, a quick search for #NYFW on the network yields an endless bounty of shots taken by users who range from schooled photographers to gawkers and lucky gatecrashers. It’s the perfect tool not just for fashion followers but for designers themselves, who cop to co-opting others’ shots for both inspirational and promotional purposes. What better way to see what everyone’s wearing without dirtying your brand new shoes on the streets of New York or Paris?

Nanette Lepore, for example, tells The New York Times that she regularly scrolls through her fans’ Instagram clips, where the themes that emerge from a never-ending sea of shots give her ideas for upcoming collections (someone must have been wearing a lot of white and beige last year):

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Israeli Fashion Biz Bans Too-Skinny Models

Milan Fashion Week A basic fact: many criticize the fashion industry for filling its runway shows and ad campaigns with models whose body mass indexes lie a few miles south of healthy. Has this supposed PR problem damaged the power or standing of the fashion and beauty business? Not that we can see. But it has led to lots of posts on the ways in which the industry’s history directly promotes unhealthy life choices (despite Karl Lagerfeld’s laughable claim that “nobody works with anorexic girls”).

Now Israel’s fashion industry has decided to follow the lead of Milan Fashion Week and counter its poor reputation by insisting that designers and advertisers only hire models within a given body mass index range and that they disclose the use of “altered images of models to make… women and men appear thinner than they really are.”

OK, we understand the well-meaning desire to push the fashion industry and limit its reliance on ultra-thin women to showcase the work of top designers. But is this really an effective way to improve the businesses practices and reputation (and to help young women develop healthy relationships with their own bodies), or is it just a way for regulator to sleep better at night? Do any of those who closely follow fashion really care about the obvious prevalence of eating disorders within its ranks? Color us skeptical.

Britain Finds Novel Ways to Bond with Global Audience

London’s 2012 Olympic Games may have inspired love at first sight among the viewing public and attendees, but from a marketing communications standpoint it’s been a long, drawn-out courtship.

“We’ve been preparing for the Olympics since 2005. To inspire visitation, our strategy has been to socialize the travel experience and centralize content to support marketing and PR,” says Karen Clarkson, VP North America for VisitBritain. She spoke at the Association for Travel Marketing Executives’ Marketing Issues Forum on Thursday in New York, discussing her company’s Olympics efforts and plans for the next James Bond movie, Skyfall.

Britain has enjoyed extended time in the public spotlight this year, from the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee celebration in June to the Olympic Games in July, the Paralympics in August and London’s Fashion Week in September. As Clarkson noted, “It’s been an opportunity to influence information about London and beyond, and not limited to sports related content. For the Olympics, we established digital content partnerships with NBC, Yahoo, The Travel Channel, The Wall Street Journal, USA Today and Travel & Leisure magazine.” She said that these partnerships helped the company generated $600 million worth of earned media impressions.

While partnership marketing plays a key role in VisitBritain’s operations, “social is at the heart of everything we do,” Clarkson explained. She described a unique pre-Olympics project in which Britain worked with the U.S. Olympic Committee to “engage athletes and have them experience Britain firsthand before the Games.” They selected and sent seven American Olympics athletes to Britain in the fall of 2011 “to showcase the destination from a U.S. perspective and to appeal to a younger demographic.” The athletes generated visual content as they interacted with their fan bases on Facebook and Twitter.

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Dangerous PR: Fashion Rep Gets Slapped at Zac Posen

We feel certain that most PR pros have their share of juicy on-the-job stories.

Some outsiders labor under the mistaken impression that PR is a safe and easy industry that attracts ambitious individuals with promises of glamour and free drinks–rather than the obsessive, hectic, extremely demanding business that it actually is. We’re here to help them realize the error of their ways with tales recounting the dangers of working in public relations.

Today’s horror story comes from the notoriously catty world of fashion, where all stereotypes are true (and they’re usually even worse than you thought).

New York’s Fashion Week is notorious for showcasing both beautiful designs and horribly entitled behavior. A dust-up at last weekend’s Zac Posen showcase included both—and Naomi Campbell was there too for good measure.

Right before the show started, fire marshals pulled a number of seats from the venue, leaving some put-out guests to stand and wait patiently for Ms. Campbell to arrive. After a 40-minute delay, tensions ran high.

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Eyeglasses Make an Image and a Fashion Statement

In recent years, eyeglasses have become the go-to accessory for individuals looking to transform their personal and professional images. Glasses have overcome their former reputation for making wearers appear unattractive and nerdy. The act of sporting shades is now “geek chic”, and some choose stylish specs to complement fashionable outfits. As usual, celebrities have led the way in advancing these trends.

With Fashion Week about to hit New York this week, we’ve drawn up a quick recap of the last decades’ influential eye wear styles. They’ve included the thick dark frames of the staid 1950s, the thinner frames and mod styles of the 60s, the 70s hip wire frames and round models highlighting 80s glam. Newer styles often borrow from and combine these retro looks.

Vision Council of America stats reveal that about sixty-four percent of adults wear eyeglasses and around eighty-five percent wear sunglasses. There is also a sizable number, estimated at about four million, who wear glasses even though they have no vision impairments, according to Freakonomics author Stephen Dubner.

Among those wearing glasses with non-prescription lenses are famous actors, chefs and athletes. The site Glasscrafters.com includes actor Drew Carey in this group, along with Iron Chef Masahuru Morimoto. Miami Heat basketball players LeBron James and Dwyane Wade have both acknowledged they only wear glasses to be fashionable, Dubner reported.

Carmelo Anthony is another successful athlete who set out to revamp his image with glasses. He’s a well-known, sometimes-controversial member of the New York Knicks who also played for the gold medal-winning U.S Olympic basketball team this year. His photo (above), is part of the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s latest print ad campaign. “What’s Your Met?” features famous people promoting their favorite Met museum masterpieces, and the bespectacled Melo looks more like an art scholar specializing in Surrealist paintings than a professional hoopster known for his off-court antics.

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Fashion Week Takes It Digital for London Fashion Week

Oh New York Fall 2012 Fashion Week! You were over before we even got to know you. Click these links for a wrap up of trends, sightings, and various potpourri from CNN, Styleite, the Los Angeles Times, and WWD. And click here for Ad Age’s coverage of some of the publicists who were working behind the scenes to make the week work.

But the fashion industry doesn’t dwell on yesterday. We’re already primping and jet setting across the ocean for the London shows. Huzzah! And the fashion industry is staying on trend with its efforts to incorporate digital technology into their shows and other promotions.

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Coming in September: Weeks Week

The brains and notable names behind some of New York’s biggest week-long events, including Fashion Week, Restaurant Week, and Internet Week, will join forces for one monster week of celebrating weeks.

The International Academy of Weeks  is launching Weeks Week,  taking place September 19 through 25. And, on September 25 — Weeks Night — Shark Week will be honored with a Lifetime Achievement Award.

“It will capture the energy, diversity, and creative spirit that are a hallmark of New York’s thriving Week industry,” Internet Week co-chairman David-Michel Davies said in a statement. “Who knows, if it’s successful, maybe we can expand it to an entire month.”

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Publicists Sweat Over Fashion Week Front Rows

fashion front row.jpg Fashion Week starts tomorrow, but publicists have been poring over the seating charts for days already. The New York Times talks with a number of publicists and other fashion insiders about the deliberations involved in assigning seats, particularly in the high-profile front row. Moreover, the drama of seating everyone reflects the shifting that’s happening in fashion media, from the staff moves to the growth in prominence of fashion bloggers.

[Image via ShoppingBlog.com]