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Posts Tagged ‘GalleyCat’

Sufjan Stevens Lectures Miley Cyrus on Grammar

sufjan-stevensWe never promised to stop posting on Miley, and this story is a must for everyone who writes and/or reads all day via our sister blog Galleycat.

Singer/songwriter Sufjan Stevens followed Sinead O’Connor in writing an “open” letter to the pop star, but he was more interested in discussing the questionable grammar in her hit “Get It Right” than her recent shenanigans:

Dear Miley. I can’t stop listening to #GetItRight (great song, great message, great body), but maybe you need a quick grammar lesson. One particular line causes concern: “I been laying in this bed all night long.” Miley, technically speaking, you’ve been LYING, not LAYING, an irregular verb form that should only be used when there’s an object, i.e. “I been laying my tired booty on this bed all night long.” Whatever. I’m not the best lyricist, but you know what I mean. #Get It Right The Next Time. But don’t worry, even Faulkner messed it up.

He then detours into a discussion of the present perfect continuous tense (which would be “I have been lying in this bed all night long”) before ending with what reads like a coming-out note:

Girl, you work it like Mike Tyson. Miley, I love you because you’re the Queen, grammatically and anatomically speaking. And you’re the hottest cake in the pan. Don’t ever grow old. Live brightly before your fire fades into total darkness. XXOO Sufjan

While we applaud Sufjan’s attempt to steer Miley through the complex maze that is the English language, we have to ask: what was up with the electronics on that last album, dude?

*Photo via this guy

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PR Fail: It’s Another ‘Worst Job Listing’…Or Is It?

Dalkey ArchiveCourtesy of our sister blog GalleyCat, we bring you news of a relatively obscure nonprofit called the Dalkey Archive Press, which received a whole lot more media attention than expected this week for posting a ridiculous, nearly insane job listing. The weird part is: we can’t quite decide whether this event amounts to a PR fail or a big win.

The group, which “exists to publish, promote to readers, and preserve modern and contemporary literature and cultures from around the world”, is looking for a couple of good (unpaid) interns who will eventually make up “the pool of candidates” for future leadership positions.

But the given requirements for these positions are a little…unrealistic (emphasis ours):

 ”Any of the following will be grounds for immediate dismissal during the probationary period: coming in late or leaving early without prior permission; being unavailable at night or on the weekends; failing to meet any goals; giving unsolicited advice about how to run things; taking personal phone calls during work hours; gossiping; misusing company property, including surfing the internet while at work; submission of poorly written materials; creating an atmosphere of complaint or argument; failing to respond to emails in a timely way; not showing an interest in other aspects of publishing beyond editorial; making repeated mistakes; violating company policies. DO NOT APPLY if you have a work history containing any of the above.”

Applicants also MUST NOT have “family obligationsdegrees to be finished, holidays to be taken, weddings to attend in Rio, etc.)”

Well, that disqualifies just about everyone, doesn’t it?

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Attention! The Next Social Media Marketing Boot Camp Starts September 13

From September 13 to November 11, mediabistro.com will be hosting the Social Media Marketing Boot Camp, an online workshop and conference that will give you the tools to build your business using the latest social media and online networks.

Speakers include Gretchen Rubin, author of The Happiness Project, GalleyCat editor Jason Boog, and Newsweek and Daily Beast writer Jessica Bennett. Join them and many others for advice and instruction, networking opportunities, and keynote speeches that will help you engage with your audience and generate sales.

Click here for more information about the mediabistro.com’s Social Media Marketing Boot Camp. And if you sign up by August 23, you receive a discount. Sounds like a good deal.

‘Facebook Effect’ Author Discusses Movie and Company’s Prospects

Left to right: David Kirkpatrick and Adweek's Brian Morrissey Photo: Nancy Lazarus

David Kirkpatrick, author of The Facebook Effect: The Inside Story of the Company That is Connecting the World, offered his views regarding The Social Network as well as the future of Facebook during a lively discussion with Brian Morrissey, digital editor of Adweek, at Adweek’s Social Media Strategies conference in New York on Wednesday.

While The Social Network was not based on his book, Kirkpatrick summarized his reaction by saying, “I liked it as a movie, but not as history. Aaron Sorkin acknowledged that he invented some characters and situations for the movie.”

Kirkpatrick added, “Mark Zuckerberg is not as vindictive a person as he is portrayed in the film. It’s a shame that young people will see the greatest entrepreneur of this era, but along with those distortions.” Overall however, Kirkpatrick believes that the movie is good for Facebook, since “it turned Mark Zuckerberg into a global celebrity.”

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There’s Only One Winner, But There’s Opportunity For Everyone

This morning, I got literary with my GalleyCat colleague Jason Boog for the Morning Media Menu, discussing the upcoming announcement of the winner of this year’s Man Booker Prize, the high honor for British fiction.

The news just hit and, against the odds, Howard Jacobson won for his book The Finkler Question. This morning, we talked about the PR possibilities for the five who didn’t win. Publicists for the other contenders can still emphasize the significance of being among the six that were up for the prize. And just because an author didn’t win the big award, it doesn’t mean the book isn’t a good read.

How would you handle the PR for the authors who didn’t take home the title?