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Posts Tagged ‘Grammy Awards’

Beyoncé and the New Face of Music Promotion

Last night’s Grammy Awards left one thing more exposed than Beyoncé‘s backside: the fact that the pop music promo game has changed. Queen B makes the rules and everyone else follows along, basking in her shadow.

It’s not really all that simple, of course: plenty of successful acts move through the usual channels when it comes to marketing and earned media. But when one reaches the heights occupied by the top of the pops, rules no longer apply.

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Oreo Does It Again with Timely Justin Timberlake Grammy Tweet

At this point, you may be a little tired of hearing about Oreo‘s game-winning Super Bowl blackout “You can still dunk in the dark” tweet. But that little bit of in-the-moment messaging brilliance was no fluke. While the Oreo social media team’s visual tweet celebrating Justin Timberlake‘s return to pop music at last night’s Grammy Awards won’t start as many conversations about the future of “real time” PR and marketing, it was just as timely and almost as clever.

Did the Oreo team create this little nugget “on the fly” as well? How could they have known that JT would perform in a bow tie? (OK, maybe they watched the red carpet event or checked out the “Suit and Tie” single’s cover. Still very sharp.)

What do we think? Did Oreo just win social media again?

The Grammy Awards: Lessons in Social Media Management

The 2012 Grammy Awards were the most-watched in history–but last night’s 2013 event may have been even bigger in terms of influence thanks to a communications team much more engaged in the art of, well, engagement. Seems like they finally got the message: social media buzz is now crucial to running a successful event.

So here are some lessons we learned from the Grammy’s social experiment:

1. Build the buzz: Many of the night’s biggest nominees didn’t tweet about the show beforehand because they didn’t need to: Mashable‘s infographic tells us that they just happened to be the biggest social media influencers as well, so their fans were already well aware of the event.

But of course the Grammy’s account aggressively promoted the ceremony well before it started, live-tweeting Saturday’s entire rehearsal event and making sure to share any relevant content from fans and nominees.

2. Make sure your audience knows how and where to find you: Repeat your handle and hashtags often, especially if you’re representing a big brand or event. This repetition may annoy some obsessive tweeters, but it will make the whole experience more user-friendly.

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CBS Warns Grammy Performers: No Boobs, Butts or Crotches!

To PR News‘s “7 Media Relations Tips for Joe Flacco” list we’d like to add: Don’t drop the F-bomb on live TV! The uptight ninnies at the FCC got a little upset about Flacco’s apparent resemblance to a drunken sailor after the Parents Television Council insisted that they investigate CBS for failing to bleep the offending word.

CBS is also airing the 55th Grammy Awards this Sunday, and we’re guessing that the Flacco incident may have inspired the network’s standards and practices department to issue this ridiculous email warning to the performers’ managers and publicists.

The full message has to be seen to be believed (emphasis ours):

Please be sure that buttocks and female breasts are adequately covered. Thong type costumes are problematic. Please avoid exposing bare fleshy under curves of the buttocks and buttock crack. Bare sides or under curvature of the breasts is also problematic. Please avoid sheer see-through clothing that could  possibly expose female breast nipples. Please be sure the genital region is adequately covered so that there is no visible “puffy” bare skin exposure. Please avoid commercial identification of actual brand name products on T-shirts. Foreign language on wardrobe will need to be cleared. OBSCENITY OR PARTIALLY SEEN OBSCENITY ON WARDROBE IS UNACCEPTABLE FOR BROADCAST. This as well, pertains to audience members that appear on camera. Finally, The Network requests that any organized cause visibly spelled out on talent’s wardrobe be avoided. This would include lapel pins or any other form of accessory.

No “actual brand name products”? No “organized causes”? No audience members with “partially seen obscenity” on their clothing? No “‘puffy’ bare skin exposure?” (Psst…we think we can see Rihanna’s “bare fleshy under curves” in the pic above. Someone call the FCC!)

It’s almost like the folks at CBS just ignored the last fifty years of pop music! Oh, and if they’re so concerned with maintaining standards, why the hell do they keep inviting Chris Brown?