TVNewser AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Hearst’

Should You Pitch to Dr. Oz’s New Women’s Magazine?

shutterstock_144522389Oh hey: a brand-new publication from Hearst will soon hit newsstands, offering “diet, health and fitness tips” to American women!

Wait, why are you yawning? This one involves Dr. Oz!

Capital New York tells us that Dr. Oz The Good Life will include plenty of the doctor’s signature clinical recommendations as well as his “wellness-minded approaches to finance.”

So how will The Good Life differ from pretty much every other magazine out there? The King of TMI himself explains:

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Content Marketing 101

Content Marketing 101Get hands-on content marketing training in our brand new boot camp, Content Marketing 101! Starting September 8, digital marketing and content experts will teach you the tips and tricks for creating, distributing and measuring the success of your brand's content. Sign up before August 15 and get $50 OFF registration. Register now! 

Condé Nast Kills Its (Unpaid) Internship Program

MID-conde-nast-sunrise-226x300This morning WWD learned that its parent company Condé Nast has decided to put the kibosh on all that bad publicity by killing its internship program dead. The company gave no comment or explanation for its decision, but we have a feeling it might have something to do with the summer lawsuit filed by two interns angry over making “less than $1 an hour” at the company. At first Condé simply decided to stop paying its lackeys altogether, but the risk apparently remained too great despite the fact that an identical class action suit against Hearst didn’t go anywhere in the end.

It’s time to re-evaluate the concept of internships. They’re supposed to provide equal opportunity career paths for talented, ambitious young students who can afford to work without getting paid, but they’re more often just a way to get entry-level work done without spending any money on hiring or benefits or any of the other annoying stuff that comes with, you know, running a for-profit business.

The Department of Labor considers internships “employment” (which must be fairly compensated under the law) unless said positions meet a list of strict requirements, so maybe Condé is simply acknowledging the fact that its internships will never meet those criteria. The more likely explanation is that someone determined that the work isn’t worth the headache. No winners here.

Condé Nast Says ‘Screw It, Let’s Just Stop Paying Our Interns’

They never learn. Or, rather, they learn that they can do whatever the hell they want. In the face of a lawsuit filed by impressionable young folk who made “less than $1 an hour” interning for W Magazine and The New Yorker, publishing giant Condé Nast has decided to double down and make it official: they no longer plan to pay their interns anything at all.

We’ll go out on a long, sturdy limb and assume that the company made this decision after a very similar suit filed against Hearst last year failed to proceed in its original “class action” form. The individually disgruntled interns involved in that case plan to press on alone, but Condé seems to think the whole thing’s a headache not worth having. This despite the fact that two guys who sued after working unpaid internships on the set of Black Swan won a settlement.

So there’s not a whole lot to see here, unfortunately.

Read more

Roll Call: Robin Leedy & Associates and iCrossing

Robin Leedy & Associates has hired Jonathan Kreissman to its senior management team as vice president of client services. Kreissman joins RL&A with more than 13 years of delivering marketing, social media and PR results for clients in the HBA, consumer packaged goods, personal care, beauty, men’s grooming, retail and lifestyle categories. During his tenure at several notable NYC agencies, including Porter Novelli, Marina Maher Communications, and Bullfrog & Baum, he worked on many iconic brands. (Release)

The Hearst-owned iCrossing has promoted six-year vet Brian Powley to global president. Powley, who initially joined iCrossing in 2007 to manage the agency’s San Francisco office before taking on the role of chief client officer and subsequently president of its North American operations. Powley takes over for president/CEO Don Scales, who is leaving iCrossing after seven years at the helm. Prior to his joining iCrossing, which currently counts 18 global offices and clients including Beam, Coca-Cola, Pep Boys and FedEx, Powley held managing director positions on the West Coast at both MRM and what was then Modem Media. (Agency Spy)

The Next Chapter in the ‘PR vs. Marketing vs. Advertising’ Debate Is Here

Obvious statement of the day: the debate over who “owns” content marketing, native/paid media and social will only heat up in the months and years to come as agencies fight (politely) for clients’ money. But the latest chapter in this timeless face-off appears to be unfolding in record time.

First comes news that big-name ad agency McCann Erickson will significantly expand upon a unit it founded last year to exclusively tackle social media projects. The unit, now called “McCann Always On” (get it?), will “[build] social media-centric marketing plans” rather than just managing clients’ pages and feeds in an attempt to back up the agency’s “sure, we can do that!” claims.

This announcement follows a telling New York Times article by advertising specialist Stuart Elliot, who reported that a growing number of ad/marketing copywriters have mastered the subtle art of “LOLspeak” as their agencies integrate more social content into client campaigns.

On the PR side, Weber Shandwick just announced its plans to expand upon the traditional definition of a PR firm by launching a new content-focused unit called MediaCo.

Read more

Hearst Prepares for Lawsuit Over Unpaid Internships

Hearst BuildingWe’ll begin this story with a disclaimer: Hearst is a Mediabistro partner. There you go.

That said, the publisher has a huge PR problem on its hands in the form of a big-news lawsuit—and its lawyers have begun to prepare by contacting affected parties in order to solicit positive testimony. We’re not quite sure that will work.

The story: When Diana Wang applied for an internship at Harper’s Bazaar, her only real goal was to make her mark on the fashion industry. She knew that it wouldn’t amount to a full-time job (it was her seventh unpaid internship), and she told New York Magazine of saving every penny in order to afford the opportunity to work as “head accessories intern” at Bazaar.

The work was considerable: Wang supervised eight other interns, and she claims that editors at the magazine told her that her internship “should be considered a real job.”

Unfortunately, the internship did not lead to the fashion gig she craved—or any other gig. Her supervisor was bold enough to tell her that she wasn’t ready for a job in fashion and that she should consider another internship. With that, she started considering her options. Given the fact that she worked a full-time schedule and drew no discernible benefits from the internship, Wang decided to file a lawsuit claiming that the internship was actually an unpaid job—and 3,000 other former interns joined her.

Read more

Print Magazines Seek Life Online Via Netflix-Inspired App

The well-documented rise of digital technology has not only changed the ways human beings consume information, but also changed how much they expect to pay for it: nothing.

Print media’s high hope is to transition its wares online, and to reinvent its outreach strategies so that consumers come back to the subscription magazine paradigm. Venerable competitors Time Inc., Condé Nast, Hearst, Meredith, and News Corp. joined forces in 2009 to form the joint venture Next Issue Media. That venture created a Netflix-inspired app to jump start sales and inspire iPad readers to purchase online subscriptions or single issues of magazines such as Vanity Fair, GQ, and The New Yorker.

Corralling all of these brands into one place could lead to more sales, but these publications need to do more than simply attract eyeballs. The public wants value.

Read more

Revolving Door: Hearst and YouTube, Current TV Countersues

Hearst is launching a YouTube channel on April 15, Hello Style, that will bring together content from five of its titles including Cosmopolitan and Seventeen. Teaser above. [via]

Current TV has filed a countersuit against Keith Olbermann claiming that he’s the one guilty of breach of contract. Filing available here.

The co-founders of YouTube are working on a new venture, Zeen, that will allow users to “discover and create beautiful magazines.” No further details about what exactly that means just yet.

Richard Huff is leaving the New York Daily News to handle PR for the CBS News programs 48 Hours Mystery and CBS Sunday Morning, and for CBS Productions and Primetime Specials. He joined the paper in 1993 and was promoted to TV editor in 2001. [via]

Read more

Roll Call: MSLGroup, M Booth, Hearst, and More

We start with sad news today: Michael Sullivan, MSLGroup‘s North American consumer practice leader, has died. He joined the firm in 2010 and was preparing for a move to London to work on a P&G project for the firm. MSLGroup’s Renee Wilson has kind words for Sullivan on the firm’s blog. And memorial service information is available here.

Katie Barr Cornish has joined M Booth as VP of the firm’s travel practice. Clients include U.S. Virgin Islands, Wyndham Rewards, and Alliance Global Assistance. She will also help with business development efforts for the practice. She was previously VP at Lou Hammond & Associates, working with clients including Mandarin Oriental Hotel Group and The Waldorf-Astoria.

Dana Lenetz has joined Hearst as associate director of PR for Cosmopolitan and Marie Claire. She was previously the PR manager for Swiss watch brand TAG Heuer.

Read more

‘Cubes’ Takes a VIP Tour of Hearst Tower

In this episode of “Cubes,” we take a behind-the-scenes tour of Hearst Tower, home to the likes of Esquire, Marie Claire, Cosmopolitan, and Elle. The LEED-certified building contains an exclusive health club, a top-secret app lab, and a dining room that has hosted several U.S. presidents, among many other amazing features.

For more videos, check out Mediabistro.tv, and be sure to follow us on Twitter: @mediabistroTV

NEXT PAGE >>