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First on PRNewser: With the explosion of Facebook and Twitter among all demos, especially the young and chatty, PRNewser has become interested in what both agencies and corporations are doing in regards to employees’ opinions bleeding over in to potentially sensitive company issues.

The rapid-fire nature of these networks begs the question: what guidelines are given to workers when they walk through the door and who is in control of the voice you use on social nets? (See Is Your Agency Co-Opting Your Personal Brand? for the agency take)

An interesting example of large company guidelines comes in the form of this propriatary document obtained from a J.Crew [NYSE: JCG] store employee who wished to remain anonymous. It was given to this clerk coincidentally, the same week the Domino’s Pizza scandal broke.

Though it doesn’t mention Twitter specifically, it seems to be the main concern as anyone with a smart phone can document occurrences or post opinions and photos in real time without the use of a company desktop.

I asked J.Crew’s Senior Director of PR Heather Lynch McAuliffe a few questions about the document including whether or not it’s just for the floor staff of the 300 or so stores and outlets, or if it applied to corporate people too.

McAuliffe declined, “The information that you obtained is proprietary internal company information that was provided without authorization and unfortunately we can not comment on it.”

We’re not sure if an incident at J.Crew could go anywhere near as awry as the nasty stuff at Domino’s. It’s common sense stuff and makes clear the company isn’t interested in a chorus of personalities mucking around with its message. And J.Crew doesn’t cultivate the racy image of a Hollister, or especially American Apparel, who might do well from some “oops” reportage of dressing room misuse.

If J.Crew’s official Twitter efforts are an indication, they have a lot of work to do to shake out their social voice. McAuliffe’s email signature finishes with @JCrew_Insider which stands at 299 followers, 1 following, and 7 updates at the time of this post.

The Blogging Policy document is after the jump:

j.jpg

First on PRNewser: With the explosion of Facebook and Twitter among all demos, especially the young and chatty, PRNewser has become interested in what both agencies and corporations are doing in regards to employees’ opinions bleeding over in to potentially sensitive company issues.

The rapid-fire nature of these networks begs the question: what guidelines are given to workers when they walk through the door and who is in control of the voice you use on social nets? (See Is Your Agency Co-Opting Your Personal Brand? for the agency take)

An interesting example of large company guidelines comes in the form of this propriatary document obtained from a J.Crew [NYSE: JCG] store employee who wished to remain anonymous. It was given to this clerk coincidentally, the same week the Domino’s Pizza scandal broke.

Though it doesn’t mention Twitter specifically, it seems to be the main concern as anyone with a smart phone can document occurrences or post opinions and photos in real time without the use of a company desktop.

I asked J.Crew’s Senior Director of PR Heather Lynch McAuliffe a few questions about the document including whether or not it’s just for the floor staff of the 300 or so stores and outlets, or if it applied to corporate people too.

McAuliffe declined, “The information that you obtained is proprietary internal company information that was provided without authorization and unfortunately we can not comment on it.”

We’re not sure if an incident at J.Crew could go anywhere near as awry as the nasty stuff at Domino’s. It’s common sense stuff and makes clear the company isn’t interested in a chorus of personalities mucking around with its message. And J.Crew doesn’t cultivate the racy image of a Hollister, or especially American Apparel, who might do well from some “oops” reportage of dressing room misuse.

If J.Crew’s official Twitter efforts are an indication, they have a lot of work to do to shake out their social voice. McAuliffe’s email signature finishes with @JCrew_Insider which stands at 299 followers, 1 following, and 7 updates at the time of this post.

The Blogging Policy document is after the jump:

j.jpg

First on PRNewser: With the explosion of Facebook and Twitter among all demos, especially the young and chatty, PRNewser has become interested in what both agencies and corporations are doing in regards to employees’ opinions bleeding over in to potentially sensitive company issues.

The rapid-fire nature of these networks begs the question: what guidelines are given to workers when they walk through the door and who is in control of the voice you use on social nets? (See Is Your Agency Co-Opting Your Personal Brand? for the agency take)

An interesting example of large company guidelines comes in the form of this propriatary document obtained from a J.Crew [NYSE: JCG] store employee who wished to remain anonymous. It was given to this clerk coincidentally, the same week the Domino’s Pizza scandal broke.

Though it doesn’t mention Twitter specifically, it seems to be the main concern as anyone with a smart phone can document occurrences or post opinions and photos in real time without the use of a company desktop.

I asked J.Crew’s Senior Director of PR Heather Lynch McAuliffe a few questions about the document including whether or not it’s just for the floor staff of the 300 or so stores and outlets, or if it applied to corporate people too.

McAuliffe declined, “The information that you obtained is proprietary internal company information that was provided without authorization and unfortunately we can not comment on it.”

We’re not sure if an incident at J.Crew could go anywhere near as awry as the nasty stuff at Domino’s. It’s common sense stuff and makes clear the company isn’t interested in a chorus of personalities mucking around with its message. And J.Crew doesn’t cultivate the racy image of a Hollister, or especially American Apparel, who might do well from some “oops” reportage of dressing room misuse.

If J.Crew’s official Twitter efforts are an indication, they have a lot of work to do to shake out their social voice. McAuliffe’s email signature finishes with @JCrew_Insider which stands at 299 followers, 1 following, and 7 updates at the time of this post.

The Blogging Policy document is after the jump:

Read more