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Posts Tagged ‘Home Depot’

Home Depot Data Breach Could Break Record Set by Target

Home Depot

Bad news for Home Depot as the company presumably prepares to issue some serious apologies: a recently reported credit card data breach could quickly surpass Target‘s nightmare to become the biggest in history.

From The New York Times this morning:

Over the last few days, thousands of fresh credit and debit card numbers have surfaced on so-called carding sites, which are websites where stolen credit card data is sold…So far, all roads point back to Home Depot. And if the evidence uncovered so far proves to be valid, the hack could top the record-setting breach of Target’s network last December.

It gets worse.

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Kellogg’s Learns the Dangers of Conditional Charity

Kellogg’s UK is the latest brand to learn a fairly basic lesson in social media marketing: charity should never be conditional.

kellogs1

We get why this tweet seemed like a good idea at the time: it’s tough to get people to engage with you on social even when they follow your feed, and nobody wants to say “no” to feeding a vulnerable child. But the equation seriously undermines the message here.

The brand thinks: “We’re sponsoring a charity program to provide breakfasts for underprivileged children, and we want our fans to share the announcement so more people will associate it with our brand.”

The audience reads: “If you don’t retweet this, a vulnerable child might not eat breakfast tomorrow. Only a terrible, terrible person would allow that to happen. You’re not a terrible person, are you?”

Generous interpretation for sure—but this is how social works, remember? Here’s a clearer version of the statement:

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Home Depot Blames Agency for Deleted Tweet

So Home Depot sent this image out yesterday to promote its College Game Day campaign:

If you see it and ask yourself “what the hell is that all about”, then you’re not the only one. Complex called it “the most racist tweet of the day“, but we’re more confused than anything. We get how the pic ties into HD’s “Bucket U” theme, but we have some questions: What was the point of the promo? Why ask the question? Why is one (white) dude wearing a monkey outfit?

There’s really no satisfactory answer to these queries, and anyway we’re more interested in Home Depot’s damage control efforts, which currently amount to “it was our agency’s fault.”

Really?

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How to Help Your Brand Connect to LGBT Audiences

Now that the majority of Americans (if not the majority of American states) have accepted same-sex marriage and effectively welcomed the LGBT community into mainstream culture, brand strategists are brainstorming over how to make the most of a large and passionate demographic. Why? Well, gay men and women do “have the largest amount of disposable income of any niche market,” so…money.

That’s according to Community Marketing Inc., a gay-centric research organization that just released its 7th annual LGBT community survey of more than 30,000 consumers in 100 different countries. Their findings should help marketing/PR pros better understand the community.

The fact that LGBT individuals “keep up with online media” isn’t much of a revelation, but here are some more interesting conclusions:

  • “LGBT” is the preferred term for gays, bisexuals and transgender individuals, though gay men are equally receptive to the phrase “gay and lesbian”. Words like “queer”, “rainbow” and “gay-welcoming” are less effective (probably because they’re condescending).
  • Consumers prefer that corporate communications refer to their legal relationships with the terms “spouse” or “husband/wife”, though “partner” also works. Dated terms like “significant other” and “gay couple” don’t test so well.