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Posts Tagged ‘Jeff Bercovici’

Revolving Door: 10.14

Here are this week’s PR and media highlights from mediabistro’s Revolving Door Newsletter:

Lauren Kern has been named deputy editor at The New York Times Magazine. She had been executive editor at O, The Oprah Magazine.

Marjorie Miller has been named Latin America/Caribbean editor at The Associated Press. She had been foreign policy editor and op-ed correspondent at Los Angeles Times.

Jeff Bercovici has been named staff writer at Forbes. He had been media columnist at AOL DailyFinance.

Liz Brody has been named editor at large at Glamour. She had been staff writer at Yahoo! Shine.

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Amidst Hyperactive News Cycle, White House Focuses on Long Term

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Despite the fact that White House Press Secretary Robert Gibbs and Deputy Press Secretary Bill Burton have been active on Twitter as of late, the Obama administration is trying its best to not let the ever increasing speed of the news cycle affect its communications strategy.

Tracy Sefl, a Democratic media strategist and senior vice president of Navigators Global, a Washington communications consultancy, told media reporter Jeff Bercovici:

“If Obama didn’t believe the news cycle was important, he wouldn’t have such a robust communications apparatus,” says Ms. Sefl. But no president, no matter how obsessed with managing the media, could possibly afford to engage with it on the hyper-granular level it now operates on. “If the White House did the same dance that the press does on the minute-by-minute news cycle basis, I can’t imagine anyone there would have the stamina to get up every day to do their jobs,” she says.

However, if Obama and his senior advisers are focused on long term messaging, that doesn’t mean Gibbs and his team aren’t focused on the daily grind.

Gibbs said recently, “the news cycle starts at 5:00 a.m. in the morning. It lasts probably until 10:00 or 11:00 at night. It sleeps only a little bit before it all starts again. And on occasion we want to get ahead of what the news is going to be that day by letting folks know.”

In this case he was describing authorized leaks, but the statement shows how the administration is focusing both on the “long” and “short” news cycles.

Super Bowl PR Winners and Losers

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[Coke teams up with The Simpsons for their Super Bowl ad.]

This is more AgencySpy’s territory, but PRNewser wanted to provide a quick recap of who “won” and who “lost” in last night’s Super Bowl marketing bonanza.

Winners:

Pepsi Refresh

Although the jury is still out on Pepsi’s decision to skip the Super Bowl in favor of a cause based social marketing campaign, Advertising Age reports that “pass or fail,” the campaign will be a “case for marketing textbooks.”

“It is surprising how much emotion is tied to the Super Bowl in terms of the industry and general public,” Chief Engagement Officer Frank Cooper told PRNewser last week in reference to how much press the brand has received for its choice not to buy an ad int the big game.

Bonin Bough, Global Director of Digital and Social Media for PepsiCo told AdAge that the strategy of using a TV spot and then making that spot into an online or Facebook strategy “does not exist anymore. That is not relevant whatsoever.”

Indeed, very few brands used their commercials as a vehicle to drive traffic to social sites. Did you notice that hardly any commercials promoted Facebook, Twitter or Youtube links?

AdAge reports that agencies Huge, Firstborn, Tribal DDB and VML have all picked up Pespi business in the last few months. Add that to the list of agencies PRNewser has confirmed to be working on the campaign — TBWA, R/GA, Epiphany/Porter Novelli, Edelman and Weber Shandwick — and that brings the total to ten PR and advertising agencies.

Google

Google’s simple ad seemed to have the highest emotional connection with views.

“We didn’t set out to do a Super Bowl ad, or even a TV ad for search. Our goal was simply to create a series of short online videos about our products and our users, and how they interact. But we liked this video so much, and it’s had such a positive reaction on YouTube, that we decided to share it with a wider audience,” wrote Google CEO Eric Schmidt in a blog post. Just the fact that Google advertised in the Super Bowl will get the company a slew of press.

The Late Show with David Letterman

The ad featuring Jay Leno, Oprah Winfrey and David Letterman is getting lots of buzz, for obvious reasons.

Focus on The Family

Regardless of where you stand on the issue, the group’s ad garnered a ton of media attention. “By setting up an expectation that it was going to do something controversial, Focus made it easy to come off as moderate and inclusive by comparison” writes Jeff Bercovici at Daily Finance.

Losers:

GoDaddy

The domain seller’s ads were predictable, yet not memorable. What does GoDaddy do again?

The U.S. Census Bureau

2.5 million of our tax dollars for that? The Bureau had to issue a press release defending itself against criticism.

Additional notes:

The New York TimesStuart Elliott live-blogged the ads.

• Agency Mullen and monitoring vendor Radian6 also hosted “BrandBowl” which examined 98,656 tweets from ad and marketing types. These Tweets, “provided an overall ranking of the brands advertising on the game based on a composite score that takes into consideration both volume of tweets and sentiment (both positive and negative).”

• AgencySpy will have more commentary today as well.

Leave your take on who “won” and “lost” in the comments.

Lifestyle Firm Offers Finder’s Fee to Bloggers for New Accounts

Katherine Rothman, CEO of KMR Communications extended an offer to bloggers who cover her firm’s specialties to help her reel in new accounts in exchange for a fee, according to a DailyFinance.com story today by media critic Jeff Bercovici

It’s not known how many bloggers she contacted:

“I would like to make an offer to you that could be mutually beneficial in the event that this is of interest…My offer is this: if you recommend a prospective client to our firm and they sign a contract with us, I would in turn provide you with a generous finder’s fee.”

There have been many cases of firms currying favor with bloggers for coverage using gifts, trips and even cash, this is an unusual case where influence could color the direction and tone of a blog on a more ongoing basis. Bercovici quotes Poynter’s Kelly McBride to make the point: “It really blurs the lines of duty, if you will…It puts your loyalty with the finder’s fee and the PR firm in front of where your primary loyalty should be, and that’s your audience.”

Rothman smoothly defended the strategy: “Quite honestly, these bloggers and Web editors don’t make a heck of a lot of money, so it’s an attractive offer for them and a win-win situation for both parties…I certainly don’t see it as a bribe in any sense of the word.”

Thrillist Responds to Blog Swarm Over Weekend Junket

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[Bloggers & journalists throwing down on sponsors' dime, via RandomNightOut]

In the debate about journalism ethics after Thrillist’s Jet Mystery junket last week, there were no flies on the company or sponsors. The disclaimer, that a few journalists didn’t match up with their contracts, clearly gives the option to pay for the trip (the text is visible in Gawker’s scan of the invite):

“Media rates are available for reporters who feel obliged to pay for the trip: tell us if you’re interested and we’ll let you know what they are.”

We checked in with Thrillist Director of Communications Flavie Bagnol who told us the same blow-back happened last year, and put perspective on the blog swarm. “People are digging into this to make it something that it is not,” she said. “I think The New York Times has much bigger fish to fry than looking into the life of a freelance journalist who was not even covering the trip.”

Bagnol also pointed out that the journalist partly responsible for igniting the swarm, did the same thing last year after their Vegas launch junket, “Jeff Bercovici seems to love the topic–or lacks imagination.”

More after the jump:

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