TVNewser AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Lululemon’

STUDY: Lululemon’s Success Lies in Making Its Customers Feel Bad

shutterstock_138566354

Why can’t you do this?!

Speaking of “unapologetic” Barbie, observers have long argued that apparel and beauty brands play on their consumers’ own insecurities to move products—and research now confirms that it’s all true (surprise surprise).

The study in question, performed by the Canadian Review of Sociology, concluded that Lululemon and other “aspirational” brands succeed on the psychological level by “promoting a philosophy that blames people if their lives aren’t fabulous”—a philosophy that reaches directly into your wallet.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Storytelling for Media Professionals

Storytelling for Media ProfessionalsLearn how to use stories to inspire, connect, and persuade your clients! In this workshop starting September 3, you'll learn how to uncover stories in everyday life, incorporate stories into your media work, use storytelling techniques with clients, all to improve your pitch and presentation skills. Register now!

Hard Work Pays Off in the End for New Spokeswoman Jen Selter

121813SelterZM67.jpg

In this week’s most important non-Super Bowl story that we somehow missed, Instagram “belfie” phenom Jen Selter signed an endorsement deal before the ink even dried on her agency contract.

Page Six broke the news that the 20-year-old New York workout fanatic, whose previous job description seems to have been “gym rat”, signed with The Legacy Agency, known for managing big-name athletes, broadcasters and other sports personalities.

The entire Internet proceeded to go butt-pun crazy, of course; The New York Post wins as usual with “Jen Selter’s butt is huge right now.

Read more

Lululemon and the Delicate Art of Repairing a Brand’s Reputation

Lululemon_Athletica,_Westport,_CT,_06880,_USA_-_Mar_2013

Lululemon will land on many year-end “naughty” lists thanks to a string of controversies amplified by a tone-deaf co-founder and his near-total inability to say the right thing at the right time. The company has a new CEO, but will the change be enough to keep the horrible headlines stuck in 2013?

We recently had a chance to speak with Carreen Winters, acclaimed blogger and executive VP of MWW’s corporate communications and reputation management practice, about the challenges facing brands like Lululemon and the art of reputation repair.

Let’s review what Lulu did wrong and how the brand might recover in the new year.

Read more

Lululemon Wisely Replaces Its Co-Founder…with Another Man

Bum ba dum bum BUM

Well that took long enough. Yogawear megabrand Lululemon finally realized that co-founder Chip Wilson, leading critic of “some women’s bodies“, was too big a liability to continue in the chairman role.

This morning the company announced that Wilson would be stepping down and that former CEO Christine Day, who announced her intentions to resign this summer, will be replaced by Laurent Potdevin. We didn’t want to say that this move was all about Wilson compounding the “revealing pants” scandal by inserting his foot firmly into his mouth, but screw it—we’ll just go ahead and say that.

Read more

Lululemon Founder Tells ‘Some Women’ That Yoga Pants Just Don’t Fit Their Bodies

Lululemon may be a big success business-wise, but the company can’t seem to avoid shooting itself in the foot on the PR front. First there was the “sheer” disaster, then the brand unintentionally dissed a Texas women’s shelter with a cheeky tagline. Now, in an interview with Bloomberg, company co-founder Chip Wilson made an unfortunately worded statement implying that the reason the pants “don’t work for some women” is that their bodies aren’t quite right. Here’s the weird remix and here’s Good Morning America‘s take:

NPR notes that Wilson “recovered somewhat, saying, ‘No, I think [most women] can [wear our pants], I just think it’s how you use them.’”

Not quite a great save. Can we all agree that the company’s chiefs need some coaching on the whole live TV thing?

Uh Oh: Lululemon’s Yoga Pants Are a Little Too Revealing

Last year the popular female-focused activewear company Lululemon accused Calvin Klein of stealing the design for its popular yoga pants. Today, however, the brand isn’t quite as proud of its signature product–turns out that many of its black yoga pants are “unintentionally see-through“, and the discovery has prompted a wide-scale recall operation that will involve 17% of all pants sold in its stores.

The company followed the news with a cute statement about how it wants fans to “Down Dog and Crow with confidence” and “felt these pants didn’t measure up”. Lululemon also offered full refunds and promised followers that all the offending pants would be recycled.

But the recall (cause as yet unknown) will create a product “shortage” and greatly harm profits at the otherwise white-hot company. This isn’t the first time that some observers have called these pants “too revealing”, either: in 2011 a Catholic high school in Canada prohibited all students from wearing them or any pants like them.

How can the brand’s PR team counter this bad press?

Lululemon to Calvin Klein: You Stole Our Favorite Yoga Pants!

Turns out that monster tech companies like Apple and Samsung aren’t the only ones going to court over copyright infringement. Popular athletic wear producer Lululemon filed suit against Calvin Klein last month for copying the design for its popular “Astro Pant” yoga wear.

Apparel design is especially tough to patent. Sample cases usually concern such iconic designs as Christian Louboutin’s red shoe bottoms, which a US appeals court prevented Yves Saint Laurent from copying last week in a case that strikes us as a little ridiculous because the offending shoes were red all over, but whatever. The concept makes sense: How can one patent the shape of a dress, for example?

Lululemon has taken matters into its own hands. Legal observers consider this case significant because the company all but anticipated the coming battle and armed itself accordingly by winning three separate patents for a product that looks to us like a simple set of skin-tight pants. The company’s most effective legal weapon is the overlapping fabric design on the Astro Pant’s waistline. Calvin Klein’s thievery becomes painfully obvious when looking at the respective waists in the photo above.

OK, so why are we really interested? Read more