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Posts Tagged ‘Marissa Mayer’

Meet the New Yahoo!

Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer continued her overhaul of the world’s least hip content/email provider today by introducing a new look for the site:

The new features mentioned by Mayer in interviews this week include “an infinite, Twitter-like news feed” and a collection of content recommended by users’ Facebook friends. Mayer signed content deals with the three major networks, switched from Microsoft to Google for ad services and announced plans to focus more heavily on Yahoo’s original properties like Yahoo Sports, movie listings and gossip site OMG.

Will Mayer’s plan to make Yahoo relevant again succeed? We don’t plan on making the site one of our chief web destinations or using its email platform anytime soon, but we will say that she is the best thing to happen to the brand in some time.

Marissa Mayer Pushes Forward with Yahoo Re-Branding

Have you heard? New Yahoo CEO/former Google exec Marissa Mayer is one of the most powerful women in the world—and she wants to prove it by dragging her company into the present day and re-branding them to improve their reputation as a fading remnant of the ill-fated tech bubble.

Last week she made the small but symbolic announcement that every Yahoo! Employee should use a company iPhone—no BlackBerries, thanks—to achieve a better sense of “consistency” across the company. While Mayer clarified that she is open to giving employees Android phones as well, the point was clear: Yahoo isn’t a relic—it needs to be perceived as a company both in and of the moment.

Yesterday she made her first big hire, bringing on digital entrepreneur Kathy Savitt as chief marketing officer. Savitt has quite a history, founding social media venture Lockerz and working in prominent communications positions at retailers Amazon and American Eagle. It will be her job to redefine Yahoo in the eyes of the public, and it’s quite a challenge.

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Thoughts on the Forbes ’100 Most Powerful Women’ List

Today Forbes released its annual list of the most powerful women in the world—and while we can’t disagree with obvious selections like Angela Merkel, Hillary Clinton, new Yahoo! Chief Marissa Mayer and Facebook CFO Sheryl Sandberg, we do wonder whether J.Lo is truly more powerful than NBC Universal/Comcast Chairman Bonnie Hammer–and whether Sofia Vergara belongs on the list simply because she sells millions of dollars worth of Pepsi products to the Hispanic market (maybe she just has a great representative). Any observations? Agreements? Disagreements?

Computer History 101 Off California’s Highway 101

Visitors won’t find advance prototypes of the next model of Apple’s iPhone or iPad at Mountain View, California’s Computer History Museum. Instead, its Revolution exhibit takes a look back at the first two thousand years of computing. The twenty galleries contain an awe-inspiring display of computer related lore from the early abacus, slide rule and punched cards to programming languages, super computers, robots, and video games to more recent tablets and mobile devices.

As the multimedia collection demonstrates, these inventions were used in nearly every facet of life: by governments during wartime to crack enemy codes, by healthcare companies for breakthroughs such as electronic pacemakers, as well as for automobile dashboards, synthesized music and sneakers with microchip technology. Several reminders of short-lived companies, brands and products are also on hand, namely DEC/Digital Equipment Corporation, and Atari’s Pac-Man game.

Colorful visuals abound for those who are less tech-inclined. Among these are the Google Street Views car with a camera and GPS on top and the Noogler propeller cap given to new Google employees. At the museum’s entrance is a statement about fashion, entrepreneurship and capitalism. It’s a dress covered with red dollar bills, worn by Sandy Lerner, co-founder of Cisco Systems, to celebrate the startup’s IPO in 1990.

An article in Sunday’s New York Times focused on female Silicon Valley executives, including Marissa Mayer of Yahoo! and Sheryl Sandberg of Facebook, preferring more fashionable work attire than their predecessors. Lerner’s dress was an even more striking commentary about the Silicon Valley lifestyle.

Ross Levinsohn Leaves Yahoo

Ross Levinsohn has left Yahoo. Earlier this month, Yahoo named former Google executive Marissa Mayer CEO, passing over Levinsohn, who had been serving as interim CEO, a move that left many wondering about Levinsohn’s future with the company. According to Ad Age, there has been wide speculation as to whether Mayer may want to surround herself with former colleagues, and also whether Levinsohn would want to stay after being passed over for the top spot.

Although Levinsohn built strong relationships with ad agencies and made content deals with media companies like CNBC, ABC News, Clear Channel, and the ad network Interclick, Yahoo’s board, with Mayer at the helm, has reportedly decided to shift its focus away from media, and onto products that tie users into the Yahoo experience.

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PRNewser Poll: What Do You Think of The Google/Zagat Press Release Alternatives?

Google made headlines last week when it announced it was acquiring restaurant guide Zagat.

Rather than go the traditional press release route, both companies decided to have a little fun with the announcement: Zagat wrote a Zagat-style review of the news (with lots of quotation marks) and Google’s Marissa Mayer said she wrote a Twitter haiku with the news after her press release was called “boring.”

The debate over the death of the press release rages on even as the physical form and various uses of it continue to change. The New York Times says the most creative alternatives are coming from tech companies, but clever announcement-making is something that lots of companies are using in order to grab some attention in an attention-deficient world.

Click through for today’s poll, which takes a closer look at these two methods from Google and Zagat. Polls are open until Friday at noon so be sure to vote.

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Google’s Mayer: It’s Still Early Days for Location Technology

In today’s Media Beat video, Mediabistro‘s Donya Blaze spoke with Google’s VP of consumer products Marissa Mayer about location-based technology and its prospects. Research has shown that users haven’t flocked to location-based apps like Google Places. Mayer says that everyone is still trying to get a feel for what they offer.

“We’re still experimenting with what are the incentives,” she says in the clip. Among the questions are “What’s the user value proposition?”

Mayer also talks about her new role with the company and Google’s thwarted bid to purchase Groupon.

Check it out here. Parts two and three air tomorrow and Wednesday.

Year In Review: Five Important PR Innovations of 2009

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We begin our 2009 Year In Review coverage with a list of five important innovations that made the biggest impact on the PR industry over the last year.

Click continued for the complete list. Coming soon in our continuing year in review coverage: agency trends, the top five pitches of 2009 and more…

1) Facebook Makes Changes to “Fan Pages”

Facebook’s changes to their “Fan Pages” in March — which are destinations set up on the social network by everyone from celebrities to large brands — was possibly the innovation that brought brands and marketers on to the social network en-masse, giving them a formal and better way to communicate. Perhaps the biggest change was that status updates from fan pages now appeared in user’s news feeds “more often,” wrote David Berkowitz in Advertising Age. This positioned brands in the same way as ones’ “friends” on the social network for the first time.

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Who At Google PR Booked Marissa Mayer on Local AM Radio?

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It seems someone at Google PR thought it would be a good idea to book Vice President of Search Product and User Experience Marissa Mayer on a local morning drive AM radio show. The first question asked in the interview: How can we find naked pictures of you on the internet? Needless to say, Mayer wasn’t pleased.

Apparently, the interview was to generate interest and excitement about the new Google Audio service coming out. However, someone in the PR department clearly didn’t think things through, or at least didn’t prep Mayer for what the experience was going to be like.

The hosts were unapologetic. “Sorry we didn’t do just a pure sunshine-y, up with people commercial for your business that you didn’t pay for,” one said.

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