TVNewser AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Mark Zuckerberg’

Media Training Tips and Cautionary Tales

In the high-risk, high-reward world of media training, major stumbles during television interviews are seared indefinitely in the public’s memory. Nailing an interview is not so easy, even for well-known public figures and corporate executives.

Media relies on basic principles and varied techniques. Today we’re focusing on seven tips–and what can happen when interviewees ignore them. As noted below, not everyone is as well-versed in handling the media as Joe Torre, (left) a former Major League Baseball manager.

Preparation is key since winging it is never a good idea. Interviewees need to wrap their heads around not only the core topics, but also the show, the interviewer and his or her questioning style. An example of what not to do? Herman Cain appeared completely clueless when asked about Libya during a video interview in Milwaukee last November, leaving several seconds of awkward, empty air time.

Keep answers brief, limited to quick sound bites. While Vice President Joe Biden is well known for his rambling remarks, the communicator in chief may need to heed this tip as well: During NYU’s Hospitality Investment Conference in June, NBC’s Chuck Todd predicted that President Obama may not win the first debate this fall, because [almost] no one has cut his remarks short during his term in office–and debates have strict time limits.

Beware softball questions. “What newspapers and magazines do you read?” is not a technically difficult question. Still, it was enough to trip up Sarah Palin during her now-infamous interview with Katie Couric during the 2008 Presidential election that was later parodied on SNL.

Read more

Facebook Needs PR Advice Now More Than Ever

Maybe you’ve heard: The once-heralded Facebook IPO is in trouble and losing value by the minute. PR experts live for big, challenging cases like this one–after suffering through an economic collapse caused by over-inflated home values and bundled stocks, the public understands the pain that comes when a financial stake doesn’t live up to the hype (even if it that stake happens to double as their favorite weekday time-waster). In other words, Facebook’s money woes garner little sympathy from Main Street. There is no victim card in this game.

Today, the public loathes overvalued anything. The fact that Mark Zuckerberg is a young, idealistic and ridiculously wealthy CEO who wears the same clothes to work that we wear to rake leaves ensures that Facebook’s negative PR arc will inspire a certain Schadenfreude. You probably even have a few outraged friends who claim to be completely “over” the Facebook phenomena–especially if they take personal offense at the new compulsory timeline format. (For the record, we think your friends are full of it.) Read more

Forget the Stock. Everyone Wants Mrs. Zuckerberg’s Dress.

After his company went public, Mark Zuckerberg married his longtime girlfriend Priscilla Chan. Sneaky! And savvy, say the lawyers.

Zuckerberg posted the pic at left on his Facebook page on Saturday — 1.2 million-plus likes! — and today, the designer behind Mrs. Zuckerberg’s dress, Claire Pettibone, is feeling the love too. People are beating a path to her homepage, wanting to get one of the $4,700 dresses Chan was married in. The designer’s website got an added 24,000 visitors because of the dress.

The dress is available at Kleinfeld’s in New York and the store’s PR team says it’s still available.

Here’s some info, in case you want to learn more about Cilla.

Facebook Tackles The Need for Organ Donors

Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg announced this morning that the social network will now have a feature allowing users in the U.S. and U.K. to spread the word to friends that they are registered organ donors. And if they’re not, there are links that will take visitors to sites where they can enroll.

Read more

Facebook to Acquire Instagram for $1 Billion

Facebook just announced that it will acquire photo-sharing site Instagram for $1 billion in cash and Facebook shares. In a statement on his Facebook Timeline, Mark Zuckerberg says that his company has always focused on the ability to share pictures with those closest to you.

“Now, we’ll be able to work even more closely with the Instagram team to also offer the best experiences for sharing beautiful mobile photos with people based on your interests,” he writes. Zuckerberg adds that they will hang on to Instagram’s ability to share with social networks besides than Facebook as well as other features “rather than just trying to integrate everything into Facebook.”

Finally, according to Zuckerberg, this is the first huge acquisition the company has made and there won’t be many like it, if any at all. The deal will close later in the quarter.

Instagram had 30 million users before it added an Android version. Once that version was made available last Tuesday, The New York Times reported that 2,000 people were signing up per minute. Instagram users upload five million photos per day. Instagram is also set to receive another round of funding, $50 million on a $500 million valuation from Sequoia Capital.

Tech Beats Hollywood with SOPA Blackout, But the Battle Continues

Wikipedia is back! Oh how we missed you.

Hollywood faced off with Silicon Valley and lost lost LOST.

So says TheWrap: “It seems that Hollywood still does not realize that it is in the information age… But with lightning speed, the leviathans of the Internet, including Google and Facebook and Wikipedia, managed to brand this battle as Bad and mobilize millions of followers.” The day before the blackouts, the MPAA [Motion Picture Association of America] had characterized the pending blackouts as “stunts.” Well, sometimes stunts work.

By afternoon (ET), Mark Zuckerberg had expressed his opposition to the bills. “We can’t let poorly thought out laws get in the way of the internet’s development. Facebook opposes SOPA and PIPA, and we will continue to oppose any laws that will hurt the internet,” he wrote. During the course of the day, lawmakers were rethinking the bills. And President Obama has come out against the proposals. Forbes says 4.5 million signed Google’s petition and millions more were in touch with their Congressional reps.

Many in the PR industry were also pointing out how the bills could impact their businesses.

Read more

Tech Round Up: No One Checks In; Zuckerberg Exposed

-I must live in a super-techie area or know a lot of hypercheckers, because according to Forrester Research, only 2 percent of adults use apps like Foursquare to check-in at restaurants, stores, or places they roam. This is a fraction of the just 30 percent of mobile phone users who have even heard of the apps. So why do I get an alert every time a fellow mom goes to Target? I’m changing my settings.

-Speaking of oversharing, on to the king of oversharing, Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. This story says his own precious site’s flaws allowed access to the young billionaire’s own private photos. Whoops! This could have been more fun if his private photos were interesting.

Read more

Facebook Settles Privacy Case, Says It Made a ‘Bunch of Mistakes’

Facebook has settled its privacy case with the Federal Trade Commission, which has been ongoing since 2009. The case stems from a change in Facebook’s privacy settings that year that made once private info public without warning. The company isn’t paying anything as part of the settlement, but, like Google, which settled its own privacy case, must have its privacy standards assessed by an outside group for the next 20 years and requires the social network to get the OK from people before it makes changes.

And the FTC really put its foot down with this mandate: “The proposed settlement bars Facebook from making any further deceptive privacy claims.” You can’t break the law again Facebook! Or else! (They typed the “or else” really hard on the keyboard for emphasis.)

Read more

Goodbye to Steve Jobs

The day after the iPhone 4S announcement, at about 5 p.m. Pacific time, the tech world suffered an immeasurable loss in the death of Apple co-founder Steve Jobs. The 56-year-old died at home after a long fight with pancreatic cancer. Some reactions follow:

President Barack Obama: ”Steve’s brilliance, passion and energy were the source of countless innovations that enrich and improve all of our lives. The world is immeasurably better because of Steve.” [via WhiteHouse.gov]

Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg: “Steve, thank you for being a mentor and a friend. Thanks for showing that what you build can change the world. I will miss you.” [via Facebook]

Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer: “I want to express my deepest condolences at the passing of Steve Jobs, one of the founders of our industry and a true visionary. My heart goes out to his family, everyone at Apple and everyone who has been touched by his work.” [via Microsoft.com]

Facebook + Spotify = Goodbye iTunes?

Photo: Facebook

Oversharing on the Internet went in to overdrive today, after Mark Zuckerberg and Co. at Facebook redeemed themselves from Wednesday’s worldwide backlash against its revamped news feed.

Facebook’s “clean” design of Timeline pages, music streaming, and more connectivity through an open-graph feature is garnering a lot of praise in the blogosphere. Zuckerberg introduced the changes Thursday morning at f8, a Facebook developers conference, and it wasn’t long until there was positive reaction all over the Web about new partnerships with Netflix (not in the U.S., so they can’t even use that to do a little damage control) and music service Spotify.

Musicians should pay attention to this Facebook transformation.

Read more

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>