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Posts Tagged ‘Mashable’

America’s National Parks and Cities Look Great on Instagram

This week’s government shutdown/crybaby conference provides us with an opportunity to remind everyone that Instagram is a perfect forum for promoting our national parks, which are really quite amazing.

This image is the exception:

Apparently we are late to the party. The U.S. Department of the Interior‘s account has been posting for more than a year, beats the hell out of Shutterstock for landscapes and already boasts more than 150K followers thanks, in part, to no-brainer posts like this one on BuzzFeedthis one on Mashable and this one on Salon.

Here’s another shot ready to become your wallpaper:

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Nikki Finke/Deadline Spat Tarnishes Powerful Media Brand

Deadline founder Nikki Finke is unquestionably one of the most powerful trade reporters in showbiz. She’s like Mashable for movies and TV: she always gets the scoop, and while publicists have learned to both love and fear her, they turn to her first to get breaking news out.

She’s also spent much of the past year in a very public disagreement with her publisher, Jay Penske—and it may have damaged the value of her brand. According to The New York Times, some film studio execs have even “pressed Mr. Penske to resolve the matter” so Finke can return to covering the industry with the “truthful and brutal” style that has become her signature rather than being distracted by internal disputes. In this case, the journalist is the brand, and that brand has as much, if not more, value to business insiders than to the general public.

Finke wants to either buy the site back from Penske or break off and form her own media entity, but her contract prevents her from doing so until 2016. It’s made for an interesting PR back and forth, with Penske’s spokespeople telling all who will listen that Finke isn’t going anywhere while denying her claims that she hasn’t received the resources promised.

Will Hollywood publicists continue going to Finke first, no matter where she lands? Do they really have any other options?

POLL: Should Publishers Use Editorial Staff to Create Sponsored Content?

How does one go about making sponsored content that doesn’t stick out like a sore thumb? A few bold publishers are answering that question by turning to their own in-house editorial teams to get the job done.

Mashable has been writing posts for sponsors for some time, but Ad Age points out a more interesting case study: Mental Floss founder Mangesh Hattikudur’s U.S. Open live-blog/trivia session post, sponsored by IBM.

Hattikudur notes that IBM did not approve the content before publishing—and he’d planned to cover the event regardless.

The point is that content created by a publisher’s editorial staff will feel more authentic and therefore bring more value to the sponsor as readers grow increasingly skeptical of advertorials.

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Trident and Dunkin’ Donuts Compete to Claim the World’s First Vine TV Ad

We missed Monday Night Football last night because we don’t have cable and we had to catch up on Breaking Bad because OMG HOW CAN THERE ONLY BE THREE EPISODES LEFT, but in the process we missed a notable development in the integration of advertising and social: Dunkin’ Donuts aired the world’s first TV ad created entirely with Twitter’s Vine app…or did it? Here’s the Dunkin’ spot:

We’ll call it “mildly amusing” and much more fluid than your average Vine, but there’s some competition on the field: Trident also claims to have debuted the world’s first Vine TV ad yesterday on music network Fuse. Their entry is a little different:

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Was This the First Time a Customer Purchased a Tweet to Call Out a Brand?

Looks like we already have this week’s biggest PR fail: a traveler was so upset about British Airways losing his luggage that he paid to promote a tweet to all the brand’s followers letting them know how unpleasant his experience had been.

“Don’t fly @BritishAirways. Their customer service is horrendous.”

This is an unprecedented story, so it quickly spread across the web via Mashable and inspired CNN to interview disgruntled customer Hasan Syed, who started getting attention several hours before BA’s customer service reps even responded.

Pretty much every media outlet around has already run this story today because it is amazing, but we have to ask: will it change the way customer service works on social?

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Teens Haven’t Really Abandoned Facebook

Yes, your 13-year-old cousin is totally over Facebook. Yes, she wrote about that fact on Mashable. But that doesn’t mean that you should sell all the stock you bought last year. More importantly, it doesn’t mean that your clients should stop paying you to manage their pages.

Slate offers a counterpoint because that’s what they do, noting that, while none of the author’s friends are on Facebook, she supposedly fears getting in trouble for unflattering pictures that her older acquaintances post on their timelines. And seventh graders never imitate their elders.

For the two hundredth time, Facebook isn’t going anywhere. More than 40% of Americans still check it every single day. Mark Zuckerberg says that the site’s teen membership has held steady over the past couple of years; if you don’t believe him, the latest Pew Research study found that it’s still far and away the most popular social network, no matter how much Yahoo paid for Tumblr.

You already know how this story ends, but we’ll clarify. All this little bit of citizen journalism means is that Facebook is not, and never really was, the be-all-end-all of social media promotions—and you’ll need more than a timeline post to win the attention of the youngest generation.

That’s it. Moving along…

Hollywood’s Wary Embrace of Big Data

In recent years the movie business has used social data to connect with audiences and stepped up its reliance on quantitative data to forecast box office revenues. However, if data represented a person, that individual may get a seat at L.A.’s trendiest restaurant, but would still be seated in the back room. That was the gist of a Tribeca Film Festival Industry Talks panel on Tuesday in New York.

“There are three countervailing forces at play that we need to balance, namely the artistic creative side, technological advances and commercial considerations”, said Jason Kassin, co-founder and CEO of Film Track, a rights management company.

“Navigating the world with data points is different than it was five years ago”, added Eugene Hernandez, Film Society of Lincoln Center‘s director of digital strategy. The biggest change is the use of sentiment analysis to monitor audience reactions, though the benefits appear mixed:

  • Sentiment-based date is broadly used: “Big data has become socialized”, said Bill Livek, vice chairman and CEO of entertainment measurement company Rentrak. Their customers include not only big studios, but also independent studios and distributors across the country.
  • Social media monitoring yields massive, but imprecise data: Sentiment analysis measures movie reviews, ratings and audience comments. As Stacy Spikes, CEO and co-founder of theatrical subscription service MoviePass noted, “Going to the movies now is a communal experience”. Nevertheless, social media data isn’t projectable, the panelists cautioned.
  • Sentiment analysis can point to the right direction, according to Christina Warren, Mashable’s senior tech analyst. “But since monitoring is mostly done by machine, it’s best to use the tool to help target audiences and markets”, she explained. Livek concurred, adding, “A social media database can drive certain activities, but not content creation.”

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Someone Finally Told The New York Times About Sponsored Content

We know it’s something of a stereotype that traditional and especially print media tend to take their time in arriving at/commenting on a hot story. Such is the case with The New York Times, which made waves this weekend by reporting on a phenomenon that PR and marketing folk already know quite well: paid or sponsored content.

We’re not saying that the many talented reporters at the Times have ignored the trend until now; this Media Decoder post regarding The Atlantic‘s Scientology advertorial scandal mentions the fact that BuzzFeed, The Huffington Post and other top web publishers already maintain sponsored content sections. But the weekend’s article does seem to be the first time the Times has deemed such content worthy of comment in print.

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Mashable, Others Run With Dubious Bitcoin Press Release

We love Mashable for giving us up-to-the-minute tech news, but a recent snafu shows us that they are not immune to the “reporting on a less-than-accurate press release” phenomenon.

Here’s the deal: “bitcoin” is a new kind of digital currency that’s popping up all over the news. The appeal behind the product is the ability to deposit, exchange and spend money without going through a bank (ICYMI, people aren’t too keen on banks right now). In Europe, which is still suffering through the aftershocks of the latest economic crisis, more and more people have become interested in the bitcoin concept — and yesterday several sources including Mashable reported on this press release announcing entrepreneur Jeff Berwick‘s plans to open the “world’s first bitcoin ATM machine” in Cyprus, the country hardest hit by the current crisis. (Note: “plans” is the key word in that sentence.)

The problem? The ATM featured in the video below is not the one mentioned in the PRWeb release — and it wasn’t created by Jeff Berwick.

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Happy Friday! Facebook Got Hacked!

According to a lengthy statement posted today on The Social Network’s official press release page “notes”, Facebook‘s systems were”targeted in a sophisticated attack” in January when some of its employees “visited a mobile developer website that was compromised” and installed malware on their computers. The employees realized what had happened and did what any rational person would do: they called the cops. Other companies were apparently targeted as well.

If we didn’t know any better, we’d say that Facebook’s PR team intentionally avoided releasing this statement to larger media outlets by posting it on a news page that no one ever reads! But of course there’s no stopping the boys of Mashable

The most important points from the release:

  • “…we have found no evidence that Facebook user data was compromised”
  •  ”We will continue to work with law enforcement and the other organizations and entities affected by this attack.”

Cool. We get it. Thankfully, Facebook has never had to deal with any significant privacy issues like this one or this one or this one or this one!

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