AgencySpy LostRemote TVNewser TVSpy FishbowlNY FishbowlDC GalleyCat SocialTimes

Posts Tagged ‘messaging win’

House GOP Sends Reps a ‘How to Discuss Unemployment’ Doc

The debate over whether or not to extend unemployment benefits, which recently expired for more than a million Americans who can’t find work, promises to provide the public with its next extremely annoying political “battle”—and our two parties have already begun practicing their counter-arguments.

Yesterday Robert Costa of The Washington Post acquired a doc distributed by House Republican Conference chair Cathy McMorris Rodgers to all members of that august body advising them on how to discuss the matter at hand.

Seems that “unemployed people are just lazy, OBV“, while popular with a certain core voter base, doesn’t play so well with the public at large. Who knew?

fullmemo

Nothing terribly surprising in here.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Mediabistro Job Fair

Mediabistro Job FairLand your next big gig! Join us on January 27 at the Altman Building in New York City for an incredible opportunity to meet with hiring managers from the top New York media companies, network with other professionals and industry leaders, and land your next job. Register now!

Spinning the ObamaCare Rollout: A Messaging Case Study

Or it WILL be open at some point.

In one of recent history’s most amazing coincidences, the day the federal government “shut down” happens to be the very same day that the statewide health insurance exchanges forming the core of the Affordable Care Act start up. The number of conflicting messages delivered by parties with diametrically opposed goals is enough to make you dizzy.

The big focus so far has been on tech issues. Yesterday Department of Health and Human Services head Kathleen Sebelius told reporters that, because operational glitches are inevitable, the public should “give us the same slack you give Apple”; President Obama made the same argument in a later speech on the shutdown-rollout event. On the other side of the aisle, Fox News debuted a running “ObamaCare glitch watch” thread to chronicle every problem reported by users.

Whatever happens regarding the law, today and the weeks ahead will make for a great case study in future public relations courses because all statements amount to strategic political positioning. It’s almost certainly safe to say that a majority of those logging in and reporting on the exchanges do so with either political or journalistic goals in mind, so here’s a review of competing messages:

Read more

Obama PR Team Recasts Victory as ‘Revenge of the Nerds’

President Barack ObamaIf you’re anything like us, you remember the 2012 election as a long, unpleasant string of joke candidates, gaffes, Twitter fights, terrible debate performances and attack ads. The Obama campaign’s PR team, however, would like the public to see the president’s re-election as a very modern tale of data nerds winning the day.

As Jason Zengerle’s essay in New York Magazine demonstrates, research and tech tools played an outsized role in ensuring that the president’s campaign apparatus raised more money and recruited more volunteers in ‘12 than in ’08—despite the fact that most supporters weren’t quite as enthusiastic as they had been four years ago. Since election day, the press team has worked hard to push this story by staying positive and emphasizing the importance of app makers and number crunchers in the re-election campaign.

So how did these nerds do it?

Read more

Will The White House’s New Social Media Strategy Work?

The White House Twitter Feed ImageThere’s no question that The White House knows its way around social media—President Obama’s “four more years” Instagram tweet quickly became the most liked and shared message in history.

Of course, officials like the President don’t just use Twitter and Facebook to post adorable pictures of themselves and their families—they also use it to drive strategy and influence policy. And yet, as we’ve seen in the past, social media is an unwieldy animal that many political groups struggle to master.

Exactly one year ago, The White House used Twitter to push an effort to extend a “payroll tax cut” that affected millions of Americans. That effort ultimately proved successful, but now Obama faces a new and potentially bigger challenge involving the much-discussed “fiscal cliff” that would result in massive spending cuts and the elimination of George W. Bush-era tax cuts if not addressed by congress before the New Year.

Obama recently debuted the hashtag #My2K, named for the approximately $2000 in yearly tax increases that would theoretically affect millions of middle-class Americans if congress doesn’t act. He tweeted his millions of followers encouraging them to offer personal stories of what that $2K might mean to them and their families—and to direct those messages to their representatives.

Sounds like a well-planned PR strategy—but will it work?

Read more

J.Crew Gets It Right

Everyone interested in how to execute proper messaging in the wake of a crisis or tragedy should pay attention to J.Crew. In the days leading up to the storm, the company sent out its usual email blasts touting the “winter’s brightest coats”, helping customers figure out “how to wear winter whites”, or enticing them with subject lines like “Tweed, please”. The company didn’t mention Sandy itself until today, when its message read:

Expressing concern for storm victims? Check. Explaining how the crisis will affect customers? Check. Avoiding any attempts at humor or blatantly exploiting the crisis for attention? Check.

Now that wasn’t so hard, was it?