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Posts Tagged ‘Michael Bush’

Roll Call: ‘Harper’s', Edelman, Porter Novelli, and More

Jason Chupick. Photo: Steve Bartel

A congratulations to one of our own: PRNewser contributor Jason Chupick has been named VP of PR for Harper’s Magazine. In this role, he’ll be heading up traditional consumer and trade PR and work closely with web editor Jeremy Keehn on community development and management. Chupick reports to John R. MacArthur, the magazine’s publisher and president. Great news!

Karen van Bergen has joined Porter Novelli as senior partner and MD of the New York office, effective January 1. She previously served as the leader of OneVoice, an Omnicom offering from Fleishman-Hillard and Ketchum. To assume this role, van Bergen will be relocating from Amsterdam. She is replacing assistant MD Joe Russo who has been filling the role on an interim basis.

Michael Bush has left MSLGroup for Edelman. He joined MSLGroup in February, serving as VP and comms director for the firm. Prior to that he was a reporter for Ad Age and PRWeek. At Edelman, he’s VP of media relations.

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Roll Call: DC Entertainment, CBS, Story Partners, and More

Gotham City Sirens #20

Warner Brothers’ DC Entertainment has named Courtney Simmons SVP of publicity overseeing media relations and internal comms. Previously, she was VP of communications for Disney Interactive Media Group.

CBS’ SVP of communications Jeff Ballabon is leaving the network after two years. “With the change in leadership, it’s time for me to leave as well,” he wrote in a memo that is currently posted on TVNewser.

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BP PR Gaffes Continue To Get Media Attention; Industry Execs Question Brunswick Group


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CBS News ran a segment almost entirely devoted to BP CEO Tony Hayward‘s PR gaffes last night. The segment comes after new advertisements running this week. Ad agency Purple Strategies created the ads and is working alongside the Brunswick Group, BP’s PR agency of record.

Advertising Age‘s Michael Bush revealed some additional information about Brunswick Group in a story today, although agency employees surprisingly had little to say to him on the record. Here’s Bush:

All of the industry executives and competitors of Brunswick that Ad Age spoke to, who all asked not to be identified, praised the shop for its work in the mergers-and-acquisitions, financial-communications, litigation, CEO-positioning and corporate-communications sectors. But a number of them questioned the decision to have the agency’s Washington office lead the crisis based on its size.

As Bush notes, these comments come from competitors, but the background is nonetheless seems to be on target.

RELATED: Kwittken On BP CEO: ‘I Think He Needs to Stop Speaking’

On the Podcast: AdAge‘s Michael Bush Dissects the PR Agency Landscape


On this week’s podcast, we discussed Goldman Sach’s PR strategy in light of their Senate testimony yesteray and changes at the top of MySpace PR.

Our guest was Advertising Age reporter Michael Bush, who talked about the PR agency landscape, referencing AdAge‘s recently published agency rankings and other trends.

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“All these agencies, the promises they made to get business…for these lower fees [during the downturn]…[it will be] interesting to see what the backlash on that will be this year,” said Bush.

Last week’s podcast guest was Marcy Cohen, senior manager of Corporate Communications at Sony Electronics. Listen to all past PRNewser podcasts here.

PR Pros Say Unauthorized Bio Won’t Damage Oprah’s Image

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Kitty Kelly is back at it again with her unauthorized biography on Oprah Winfrey.

The well-known author, who has penned bios of Frank Sinatra and Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis, among others, has some bold allegations about Oprah in her book, which she says led to some top-tier media outlets refusing to have her on for an interview, in a show of solidarity with Oprah.

At least one show — CNN’s Larry King — questioned Kelly’s claims of being turned down for an interview. A CNN insider told Galleycat, “Larry King hasn’t spoken with Kitty Kelley in five years.”

mediabistro.com interviewed Kelly yesterday for the latest installment of our Media Beat video interview show, scheduled to air beginning Monday. mediabistro.com senior editor Donya Blaze asked Kelly during the interview if she thought writing the book would harm her own career. She said no.

Meanwhile, AdAge‘s Michael Bush spoke with several PR executives who said the allegations in the book will have zero influence on Oprah’s reputation, but of course, will help sales of the book.

People Don’t Trust Their Friends Anymore?

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Here’s a fascinating take-away from Edelman’s 2010 Trust Barometer — the number of people who view their friends and peers as credible sources of information about a company — dropped by almost half, from 45% to 25% since 2008.

“It’s a more-skeptical time. So if companies are looking at peer-to-peer marketing as another arrow in the quiver, that’s good, but they need to understand it’s not a single-source solution. It’s a piece of the solution,” Edelman CEO Richard Edelman told Advertising Age.

Part of the decline in trust could be because people now connect with more and more “friends” via Twitter and Facebook then ever before. Hence, the more people one connects with, the less likely they are to know them personally, and trust them.

However, there is another factor in play. Perhaps, with all of the PR shilling going on in social media, it has devalued the amount of trust people put into those sources. As Advertising Age‘s Michael Bush writes, “People have caught on to the fact marketers are increasingly behind that influential blog post or tweet.”

One agency CEO quipped to PRNewser that they found the Edelman results “ironic” considering it was Edelman who “pioneered the usage of shill bloggers back in 2006.” The CEO referred to the famed Wal-Mart blogging campaign. In addition, it was PR that pushed brands into social channels, in part arguing that “peer-to-peer” communication is more trusted than other forms of PR and advertising.

Lets take Twitter as an example…

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Weber Shandwick Ranked Ninth On AdAge “A List”

Weber Shandwick is the only PR agency on Advertising Age‘s Agency “A-List” report released today. The agency has been on a new business streak and “brought in $50 million in new accounts last year, including the likes of Samsung, PepsiCo, HSBC, Juniper Networks, HP and Wisk,” reports AdAge‘s Michael Bush.

Bush highlighted successful campaigns for clients Kentucky Fried Chicken (KFC) and Electrolux. “More and more, we’re becoming the brand stewards rather than the brand tactical executors,” Weber Shandwick CEO Harris Diamond told AdAge.

Edelman was the only PR firm to make the list in 2008.

How To Work With, Identify and Measure ‘Influencers’ In Social Media

° “We call it social influencer relationship management…We provide them with new content and values they can pass along to their readers to get them involved in the program.” — John Bell, managing director 360 Digital Influence at Ogilvy PR to Advertising Age‘s Michael Bush on client Kodak’s “Time to Smile” campaign. Read the full story here.

New FTC Guidelines Go Into Effect Tomorrow; Social Media Campaigns Continue Unabated

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The FTC “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising,” officially go into effect tomorrow.

That being said, the changes have not slowed down so called “word of mouth” programs, especially by retailers in full holiday sales mode. “Don’t expect the FTC’s new guidelines on product endorsements to put a damper on social-media efforts,” wrote Advertising Age‘s Michael Bush today, citing numerous agency and internal brand marketers.

For example, blogger Melanie Notkin — known as Savvy Auntie — posted numerous Twitter updates from her sponsor JC Penny over the weekend and into today. Not all contained disclosure. Notkin herself admits to the rules being vague. “I don’t know. I try my best to make it clear,” she tweeted, in regards to if she only has to disclose her sponsor once, then is free to tweet and blog away with no disclosure.

Richard Cleland, Assistant Director of the FTC’s Division of Advertising Practices, told our sibling blog AgencySpy last Wednesday, in reference to tweets from tennis star Serena Williams: “When it is clear from the context of a communication that the celebrity is being paid, an additional disclosure is not required.” At this point, it seems the only thing that is clear is that everything is unclear. Marketers and bloggers alike should err on the side of caution, and it could be that “some will get screwed and some won’t” as one source put it to us this morning.

Is PR Cutting Out the Middle Man?

That’s the question Advertising Age‘s Michael Bush asks in a story today. By creating their own original content and hosting it online on their own websites and sites like Facebook and Youtube, companies are increasingly going direct to the consumer.

This is in line with a recent survey we highlighted last week that revealed 86% of companies are creating or plan to create original content. Bush cites companies including Best Buy, MasterCard and Proctor and Gamble.

“Sometimes mainstream [media] can’t keep up with the needs of the company to get stuff out,” said Andrew Foote, senior VP in the digital media practice at Cohn & Wolfe. Foote works on the Mastercard account, which has gone the “low-production route,” wrote Bush, citing Flip cam videos being posted directly to Youtube.

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