TVNewser Show TVNewser AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘NFL’

The Super Bowl Will Force Times Square Into ‘Lockdown’ This Year

Get ready to address a whole lot of complaints from the notoriously friendly people of New York City, NFL!

Seems the old National Football League will install a 180-foot-long toboggan in the middle of Times Square to promote the 2014 Super Bowl, set to be played in historical East Rutherford, New Jersey. And yes, that means closing off  the area from 33rd to 48th streets to all traffic for an entire week. Here’s an artist’s extremely optimistic rendering:

2013_12_superbowltobo

Of course the event will be heavily patrolled by “police helicopters with special sensors to detect radiation on the ground”, bomb-sniffing dogs, more cameras than you can count and “ lots of radiation detection boats in addition to the usual complement of heavily armed cops.”

Sounds fun—and we can’t imagine any New York-based journalists writing articles about how annoying it is or posting pictures of the mayhem on Twitter.

We look forward to a detailed play-by-play analysis of all the (fake) snowball fights.

(H/T Gothamist)

Sonic Drive-In Feeds Chiefs and Redskins Fans Some Crow via Twitter

SonicSignIt’s no secret that I loathe politically correctiveness. People get too offended about too many things these days. In the words of a villainous philosopher, “Why so serious?” However, when it comes to the NFL, well … I’ll let you be the judge of this ballyhoo.

Full Disclosure: Sonic Drive-In is sheer greatness and I would adore to do PR for this company. (Call me?) However, to paraphrase a marketing slogan, “This is not how you Sonic.” Just look at the sign outside a Missouri Sonic, soak it in and more after the jump…

Read more

The NFL Still Deserves Bad Press for Breast Cancer ‘Pinkwashing’

NFL breast cancer2As the month of October winds down it’s time to revisit what is becoming an annual controversy involving breast cancer, the National Football League and “pinkwashing.”

A year ago Business Insider reported that only 8% of the proceeds from the sale of the NFL’s “A Crucial Catch” breast cancer awareness products go to the American Cancer Society, and this year the same author followed up with a variation on the story, this time calling the total “shockingly small“. The league didn’t dispute these numbers but simply said that it raised a total of $3M from 2009 to 2012, which isn’t too terribly impressive for a business that expects to reach $25 billion in revenues by 2027.

Read more

Which Beauty Brands Have the Best Breast Cancer Awareness Month Campaigns?

.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and while the NFL might not be as generous as we’d hope in donating to related causes, some beauty brands are. We’ve gathered a few dedicated companies listed by different publications to see which ones are going above and beyond on the breast cancer PR front.

The New York Times lists:

Lucille Roberts adds a few more:

Read more

Football’s League of Denial Concussion Controversy Is More Than a Century Old

Last night marked the debut of League of Denial, the PBS documentary on the concussion epidemic currently affecting American football from the pee wee leagues to the NFL Hall of Fame. We didn’t get a chance to watch it, but we’ll give you our take when we do.

In the meantime, these “Tweets of Old” are a brilliant reminder that this red hot controversy is nothing new.

It’s a bit of a wake-up call to realize that journalists in 1905 reached the same conclusion we’ve reached today: yes, “concussions of the brain” and “broken backs” are a problem—but good luck reforming football, because “the only way of reforming a bad dog is by cutting his tail off close behind the ears” (poor dog!!).

We’ll see if this doc makes a difference.

Should Washington’s Football Team Continue Using the Name ‘Redskins?’

Finally, a sports controversy that has nothing to do with steroids, gambling or murder!

The debate over the Washington Redskins‘ name and its relationship to the Native American community has been with us for a while, so here’s what happened this summer:

  • Team owner Dan Snyder said he’ll “never” even consider changing the name
  • NFL spokesman Brian McCarthy told NBC that “The name from its origin has always intended to be positive and has always been used by the team in a highly respectful manner”
  • Upstate New York tribe Oneida Nation launched a radio ad campaign that will pressure the team to change the name throughout the season
  • A group of Native Americans filed suit looking to strip the team of federal trademark rights to the name
  • Former Raiders CEO Amy Trask wrote that it is “unacceptable to use a derogatory term when referring to any person or any group of people; and the word Redskins has been widely used throughout our history as a derogatory slur”
  • “Full-blooded American Inuit chief” Stephen Dodson “reached out“ to tell the team that he’s “honored” by the name and that others can’t claim to speak for the entire NA community

NFL Reaches $765 Million Settlement with Former Players in Concussion Case

Breaking news: the National Football League‘s notorious concussion case headache is over—for now. The league reached a $765 million settlement in the class action suit filed by 4500 former players who claimed that they were misled about the toll a (brief, ridiculously profitable) football career would take on one’s mental and physical health.

Our big conclusion: this is more of a a PR fail than a monetary fail. Given the fact that the league brought in at least $10 billion in profits last year, looks poised to reach $25 billion within the next five years and miraculously retains its status as a non-profit organization, this is a big but completely manageable hit—each player will get just under $200K, which is less than what most would earn playing a single game. Oh, and we just learned that the freaking NFL, which is one of the most successful businesses in the world, doesn’t have to pay taxes. Sometimes ignorance is bliss.

Touché.

Read more

Patriots Coach Bill Belichick Is a Media Relations Genius

“You keep it boring, String. You keep it dead f*cking boring.” – Joseph “Prop Joe” Stewart

Gangster’s motto or PR strategy? It’s both: the quote succinctly explains how drug kingpin Stringer Bell avoids attracting too much attention from the cops and how Bill Belichick, coach of football’s incredibly successful New England Patriots, manages to keep his team in the media’s good graces despite several recent run-ins with the Bad News Bears.

In an article titled “Nobody outworks Belichick in the game of media control,” former Patriot and current Sporting News analyst Ross Tucker explains the man’s secret: keep things nice and dull.

Sounds too simple, doesn’t it? For most pigskin squads, news of a top receiver’s indictment for murder and the arrival of Tim “Jesus Is My Homeboy” Tebow would attract more bad press than a Kardashian wedding. Yet the Patriots have so far managed to avoid the fallout from the Aaron Hernandez and Tebow sideshows. According to Tucker, it’s because the team is “uniquely suited to handle the media scrutiny,” and it all comes back to the man in charge and his diligent approach to PR.

Read more

PR Fail: Report Names ‘America’s Worst Charities’

For about 70 cents, you can buy a soda (regular or diet)...

For about 70 cents, you can buy a soda (regular or diet)…

No industry relies more heavily on the public’s good will than the non-profit sector, which ostensibly exists for the sole purpose of serving the greater good. For this reason, inflammatory reports about how some of America’s biggest charities spend their money present professional and ethical challenges for crisis comms experts.

50 foundations around the country desperately need some good PR right now after a joint project by the Tampa Bay Times, CNN, and The Center for Investigative Reporting named them among the worst in the country for doing little beyond “turn[ing] donations into profit.”

The saddest part about this story is the fact that most of the groups on the list claim to support children, veterans, cancer victims, and public servants like cops and state troopers. We’d like to think that Americans will be quick to punish any charity suspected of exploiting sick kids.

Read more

FTC Threatens to Give Bieber a Spanking

Dude, it doesn't count if we can't see the label.

Most 19-year-olds don’t get a chance to visit outer space, leave their pet monkeys stranded in Germany or cruise the California highways in a leopard print Audi 8 at speeds high enough to draw warnings from local cops and former NFL players.

In some ways, however, Justin Bieber is just like every other American boy; he loves his mommy enough to buy her flowers every Mother’s Day. More specifically, he loves 1-800-Flowers, and he wants his 40 million Twitter followers to know all about it.

No one should be surprised to learn that Bieber has a contract with 1-800-Flowers, but you won’t see any mention of that fact in his promotional tweets. The Biebs is only the most prominent of a slew of celebrities endorsing brands on Twitter and other social media forums with no disclaimers in sight. Kim Kardashian, for example, often makes five figures for a single branded tweet but never discloses her relationships with her sponsors.

That might change soon if the FTC has its way.

Read more

<< PREVIOUS PAGENEXT PAGE >>