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Posts Tagged ‘Nicholas Carlson’

Have You Seen a More Awkward Interview? TechCrunch’s Mike Arrington Interviews MySpace PR Chief

Does it seem like MySpace PR chief Dani Dudeck agreed to do this interview with TechCrunch editor Michael Arrington? Not at all. She doesn’t answer any questions, but instead just awkwardly smiles into the camera.

Arrington and Dudeck have been rumored to be “romantically linked” at one point, says Alley Insider’s Nicholas Carlson. Perhaps that explains the awkwardness?

As Carlson writes, “If his goal was to embarrass her, it worked.”

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AOL To New Reporters: ‘We’re Not Gawker, So Be Friendly and Authoritative’

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AOL is in the midst of a massive re-branding and re-organization that will position the company as a media company as opposed to internet service provider. They are one of the few companies hiring new reporters and editors.

Want to get a heads up on how to pitch this growing editorial staff? Silicon Alley Insider’s Nicholas Carlson got his hands on an email to new reporters, which outlines how the company would like them to pitch and report stories. Of the site’s writing style, an editor says, “We’re not Gawker, so be friendly and authoritative.”

Reporters are also expected to “Include 140 characters for a Tweet or Facebook update” when filing stories.

Hey TechCrunch, Enough With the Embargoes Already

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TechCrunch editor Mike Arrington is sick of being told by companies when the blog can break their news (also know as an embargo). Arrington first wrote about his disdain of embargoes last December and now says “the last has fallen” now that Google and Microsoft are “no longer able to hold embargoes.”

Nicholas Carlson, editor of TechCrunch competitor Business Insider, told PRNewser, “It’s not a Business Insider policy, but I tend to ignore embargoed stories unless they’re really huge news. It doesn’t do us much good to run with the same story as 9 other pubs. Readers probably benefit from getting a fast second take instead, too.” Another editor we spoke with who declined to be named wasn’t buying Arrington’s song and dance. “They [TechCrunch] routinely publish 10 minutes before an embargo,” he said.

Meanwhile, blogger Robert Scoble said, “I’m always shocked that PR people care in any way about this…” – he’s right – and gave “10 Ways to Screw up @techcrunch’s Embargo Policy.”

[image: jdlasica/Flickr]

Talking New Media Reporting at Publicity Club Of New York Luncheon

There are no “deadlines.” Twitter is our number one source for getting news. We’re all kind of working 24-hours a day. Those were just some of the statements made at the Publicity Club of New York’s “New” Media Beat luncheon today.

Featuring David Kaplan of PaidContent, Nicholas Carlson of The Business Insider, Mediaite’s Rachel Sklar, The Huffington Post’s Danny Shea and The New York TimesBrian Stelter, the panel dug into what “reporting” means and how it has completely changed in the digital, social world.

PRNewser attended and live-tweeted the event. You can checkout the complete stream here and our updates here. After the event, we caught up with Huffington Post Media Editor Danny Shea for a brief video interview in which he described how he uses social media for sourcing stories, what some of the best PR pros do to get his attention and if PR is doing a good job of communicating in the real time, 24/7 news environment.

Facebook PR “Punks” TechCrunch

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It looks like Facebook PR is getting sick of bloggers and reporters who don’t call them to fact check before writing stories, specifically the popular blog TechCrunch. In a post late yesterday, titled “Yeah Ok, So Facebook Punk’d Us,” editor Michael Arrington lays out how TechCrunch reporter Jason Kincaid fell for a Facebook PR prank.

Long story short, Facebook added a fake feature, “Fax This Photo” below all pictures, that only TechCrunch employees could see. Noticing the new feature, Kincaid emailed Facebook for comment. When he didn’t hear back from them after 25-minutes, he posted: “Facebook Now Lets You Fax Your Photos. I Have No Idea Why Anyone Would Want To Do This.”

Of course, about an hour later, Facebook PR confirmed the hoax to Kincaid, which was then followed by the update post by Arrington. Would something like this fly with The New York Times? Definitely not, as The Business Insider’s Nicholas Carlson pointed out (see comments). However, was it a funny way to remind TechCrunch to call sources before posting? Yes.

[image via TechCrunch]

AOL EVP of Comm. Earned $400,000+ in 2008

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Silicon Alley Insider’s Nicholas Carlson browsed through AOL’s SEC filing and found the following: “In 2008, AOL EVP and communications boss Tricia Primrose earned a $428,333 salary to go with stock awards totaling $182,466.”

In related news today, AOL parent company Time Warner (TWX), which is currently going through the process of spinning off AOL a stand alone company, bought back a 5% stake that Google owned in AOL for $283 million. The buyback values AOL at about $5.7 billion.

Changes at Facebook: “Entire Meetings Are About PR”

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[image cred]

It looks like as Facebook moves towards a potential IPO, or at least in a direction to prove they will become a profitable company in the long term, the company is working on polishing its spin tactics.

The tech media is digging in on the departure this week of CFO Gideon Yu, which the company backed up by saying they needed a CFO with “public company experience.” Not everyone is buying that reasoning, especially since Facebook’s previous CFO already had public company experience. Writes Silicon Alley Insider’s Nicholas Carlson:

Bringing in Sheryl Sandberg and Elliot Schrage, Mark Zuckerberg hired two executives who are very good at PR. Since when you’re holding a hammer everything looks like a nail, Facebook now focuses far more on its public image than it ever used to. Says one source, “entire meetings are about PR and what we’re going to say to the public. In the old days [PR] was almost scorned.”

Currently Facebook works with Outcast Communications in addition to its internal team led by Brandee Barker.