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Posts Tagged ‘NPR’

Turns Out NPR Doesn’t Heart the Environment That Much After All

NPR HQ

This may not be breaking news, but National Public Radio (NPR) leans ever-so-slightly to the left. If someone were to poll its listeners in search of cliches, one might find a coterie of granola-eating, Democrat-having, hippie-being, skinny jean-wearing, rarely bathing (allegedly) folk.

If that “one” is not the prejudicial type, he/she might also discover that NPR is partial to good journalism and that it employs a few reporters known to evoke a love for our planet. The network even has its own division dedicated to the environment.

Or did, until a couple of days ago.

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OKCupid Co-Founder on Emotional Experiments: In 20 Years, No One Will Care

OKCUPIDWe’ve all heard about Facebook‘s ill-conceived “emotional experiment” and OKCupid‘s even better follow-up. While Facebook’s research only concerned slight tweaks in the algorithm that determines which stories show up in users’ news feeds, OKCupid experimented on total strangers who would later meet each other and go on what we call “dates.”

We’re interested in the story primarily because Facebook’s response was simply a blog post that didn’t serve as a very effective piece of self-defense. OKCupid co-founder Christian Rudder, on the other hand, has gone all out to defend his company’s practices as the kind of thing we deal with every day as connected individuals — whether we know it or not.

Last week, to follow up on his “yes, we experimented on people, now get over it” blog post, he gave an interview to TLDR, a podcast associated with the excellent NPR show On the Media (which we encountered via the also-excellent Press Think blog).

The fourteen-minute segment is well worth a listen–especially for anyone with clients in social media.

Some key quotes and takeaways after the jump in case you can’t listen or don’t have time.

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NPR to Employees: ‘Retweets Actually Are Endorsements, So Quit It!’

does-not-equalSomething that has plagued reporters of any ilk for years is the dreaded retweet button.

Although they work for a particular network (local or national), they have personal accounts … and opinions. Thanks to becoming the personification of the TV network, the disclaimer “Retweets are not endorsements” appears throughout Twitter bios everywhere.

But does that even matter? Are retweets endorsements or just sharing opinion?

Twitter has created a subculture and an unspoken set of rules that reflects retweets as implied endorsements. You share with your followers and that means it becomes your opinion. To be retweeted means someone else likes your tweet because you shared good information. And that they agree with it, most of the time.

So, NPR has stepped in and said what most of us already think…sorta.

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A Shot of Creative Inspiration from Ira Glass of ‘This American Life’

All the talk of content creation has led many of us in the PR field to re-examine what we do—and to question the value of our work.

The frustration of the creative process is something that everyone in media understands. Most of us experience it, one some level, every day.

This commentary by Ira Glass, host of NPR’s ”This American Life”, is a few years old; it was originally part of his series “On Storytelling.”

But the passage of time makes it no less relevant to the work we do. And this new video, created by German artist Daniel Frohlocke, helps visualize the sentiment.

It’s quick but inspiring. We hope you enjoy it as much as we did.

Yes, Wall Street Still Has a Big Perception Problem

Got 15 minutes to spare? Listen to this NPR ”Planet Money” clip in which New York magazine financial writer Kevin Roose gives us a hint as to why the insular world of big finance no longer appeals to Ivy League MBAs as much as it used to. In short, The Social Network is this generation’s Wall Street.


Roose says:

“The sex appeal is in Silicon Valley now. It has the…cultural cachet that Wall Street used to have…the tech industry is making things…”

That’s a key insight: tech makes things while Wall Street “re-bundles” things—at least according to popular opinion.

Younger bankers want to change all that. While all evidence indicates that the old generation is perfectly fine with being feared, the new generation “wants to be loved.”

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I’ll Take ‘How the Hell Do You Pronounce GIF?’ for $1000, Alex

Alex Trebek has obviously never searched for “Mean Girls” in Google images or visited the I Work in PR page.

Last night’s final Jeopardy question weighed in on the GIF pronunciation controversy, prompting responses from every resident of Geekville eager to resolve an argument that started one night in a Silicon Valley juice bar after a few too many shots of wheatgrass:

The answer, of course, was GIF, and the person in question was tumblr CEO David Karp. But is the debate over? Oh no.

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How False Advertising Created Kraft’s Famous Bright Orange ‘Cheese’

shutterstock_65962642Earlier this week our own Shawn Paul Wood made light of Kraft‘s decision to get rid of the artificial dyes that give some of its mac and cheese products that signature “nuclear orange” color in response to an online consumer petition.

We would call this a PR win, but NPR‘s “All Things Considered” wanted to know more: why did Kraft feel the need to color its cheese in the first place?

The answer is simple: a 250-year-old-case of false advertising.

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Lululemon Founder Tells ‘Some Women’ That Yoga Pants Just Don’t Fit Their Bodies

Lululemon may be a big success business-wise, but the company can’t seem to avoid shooting itself in the foot on the PR front. First there was the “sheer” disaster, then the brand unintentionally dissed a Texas women’s shelter with a cheeky tagline. Now, in an interview with Bloomberg, company co-founder Chip Wilson made an unfortunately worded statement implying that the reason the pants “don’t work for some women” is that their bodies aren’t quite right. Here’s the weird remix and here’s Good Morning America‘s take:

NPR notes that Wilson “recovered somewhat, saying, ‘No, I think [most women] can [wear our pants], I just think it’s how you use them.’”

Not quite a great save. Can we all agree that the company’s chiefs need some coaching on the whole live TV thing?

Amazon Baits Top Reviewers With Free Crap (and Journalists Follow the Trail)

amazon

We might just be naive, but this story destroyed everything we thought we knew about Amazon reviews.

Most of the site’s top reviewers are members of an elite “Vine” club called upon to “advocate” for brands that make everything from books to lightbulbs to cameras. Amazon encourages them to compete for the top spot by writing more, and partner companies looking for good reviews send them free crap while hoping for the best.

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Stephen Colbert Hosts StoryCorps Gala, Discusses the Art of Storytelling

Many of us love Stephen Colbert for his ability to stay in character, but last night he talked about other characters—and how their stories compel him.

The event was the tenth anniversary of StoryCorps, the NPR project dedicated to sharing the tales of everyday Americans and painting a broader, deeper portrait of our nation and its people.

After the event, Colbert talked to Vulture about the art of storytelling. Some key quotes:

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