TVNewser AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Pew Research Center’

STUDY: What Will ‘the Internet of Things’ Look Like in 2025?

shutterstock_45323689

Predicting the future of technology is a fine art indeed.

The invaluable Pew Research Center is as good as anyone at testing the winds to see which way things will go–and the center’s latest report, created to coincide with the World Wide Web’s 25th anniversary, takes a shot at it.

So what will this “Internet of things” look like a decade down the road? Let’s see what “1,867 experts and stakeholders” had to say about it…

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Social Media 101

Social Media 101Get hands-on social media training in our online boot camp, Social Media 101! Starting September 4, social media and marketing experts will help you determine the social media sites that matter most to you, based on your personal and professional goals. Register before July 31 and get $50 OFF with early bird pricing. Register now! 

What Is the State of the News Media, Pew Research Center?

shutterstock_62541346

In case you missed it, last week Pew Research Center released its annual, invaluable State of the News Media report.

The big conclusions may sound familiar: while new digital outlets continue to spring up pretty much every day with the help of venture capital injections, they’re more concerned with earning readers and influence than making money, the vast majority of which is still driven by traditional advertisements in print and on TV.

That said, every major publisher has now embraced branded content (however reluctantly).

Read more

STUDY (and not-so-Breaking-News): Digital Reporting On the Rise

digital_natives_news

Yes, behind every online breaking news report is a homeless-looking hipster pushing the buttons.

Everyone, say it with me: “Digital Native News.

ICYMI: This is the future of journalism. Ask any reporter in print, broadcast, or online (obviously, there), and they will tell you the same thing. And although many journalists are unfortunately getting demotions and pink slips in their annual reviews, the Pew Research Center came out with this report about “The Growth in Digital Reporting.”

And the infographic after the jump is worth printing and pasting on your bulletin board.

Read more

Analyze This: The Latest Digital and Consumer Intel from ARF’s RE:THINK Conference

Do Not Disturb Sign Final CroppedComing to terms with issues surrounding big data and digital’s vast terrain seems like running on an endless treadmill. But at ARF’s RE:THINK 2014 conference in New York this week, attendees found some answers to dilemmas like online consumer privacy, what drives contagious content and defining digital metrics. A research survey, mnemonic device and reference guide all contained clues, and below are key takeaways.

Consumers’ reaction to online privacy incursions: Do not disturb.
“The creepy part of privacy invasion is when they get it right”, said Communispace‘s chairman, Diane Hessan. Her firm collaborated with Pew Research Center, conducting research among 50 global communities, to understand tradeoffs between online privacy and personalization.

The key finding: 86% of consumers would stop data tracking if they could. Only 14% would like to receive targeted offers based on purchase or browsing histories. Older consumers are more concerned with privacy, and younger ones are more open to offers. Online users want to avoid invaders like hackers or advertisers, finding targeted ads to be annoying, creepy and intrusive.

Read more

STUDY: Readers Less Engaged with Content Found via Search or Social

shutterstock_97345046

In one of the week’s most interesting studies, the invaluable Pew Research Center’s Journalism Project found that readers who visit news sites directly are more engaged with the content they encounter than those who come across the same stuff on social.

This finding applies to search engines, too:

  • The average direct visit to any given news site lasts 4 minutes, 36 seconds
  • The average visit to the same site via a link on social or a web search lasts only 100-102 seconds

Unsurprisingly, the regular reader is more dedicated. There’s more…

Read more

Teens Haven’t Really Abandoned Facebook

Yes, your 13-year-old cousin is totally over Facebook. Yes, she wrote about that fact on Mashable. But that doesn’t mean that you should sell all the stock you bought last year. More importantly, it doesn’t mean that your clients should stop paying you to manage their pages.

Slate offers a counterpoint because that’s what they do, noting that, while none of the author’s friends are on Facebook, she supposedly fears getting in trouble for unflattering pictures that her older acquaintances post on their timelines. And seventh graders never imitate their elders.

For the two hundredth time, Facebook isn’t going anywhere. More than 40% of Americans still check it every single day. Mark Zuckerberg says that the site’s teen membership has held steady over the past couple of years; if you don’t believe him, the latest Pew Research study found that it’s still far and away the most popular social network, no matter how much Yahoo paid for Tumblr.

You already know how this story ends, but we’ll clarify. All this little bit of citizen journalism means is that Facebook is not, and never really was, the be-all-end-all of social media promotions—and you’ll need more than a timeline post to win the attention of the youngest generation.

That’s it. Moving along…

Healthcare Not Yet Mobile: PCs Still Dominate the Market

For all the talk of smartphones and tablets, you’d think every American plugs into an iPad after work each day and that millions of PCs currently sit in the corners of our homes gathering dust. Yet a recent survey conducted by Makovsky reveals that most Americans will stick with Old Reliable when it comes to their most significant expenditures: healthcare.

Despite the vast technological advances driving the evolution of healthcare around the world, healthcare communications remains a very traditional field. The message to PR pros operating in the industry is clear: Most patients prefer old-school human interactions—and tech tools will not necessarily win the day.

We have no doubt that, at some point in the relatively near future, medical research conducted via smartphone will be so easy and common that everyone from your little brother to your grandmother will wonder why they didn’t start doing it sooner. But the Americans who spend the most money on healthcare aren’t quite ready to make that leap just yet.

Here are some of the survey’s key findings: Read more

Seems Like ‘The Rich’ Might Have a PR Problem

While Americans generally “admire” and may even envy our wealthiest countrymen, we don’t seem to like rich folk very much! These are the conclusions drawn from an intriguing Pew Research Center survey released yesterday.

How do the “average Americans” across the economic spectrum who answered these questions view “The Rich?” Well, most of us reckon they may be smarter than us, harder-working than us, and even better-looking than us; heck, the vast majority of our kind respect and admire them–assuming that they made their money “by working hard.”

But we’re also fairly sure that they’re greedier, less honest, and less appreciative of the sacrifices that us ordinary folk have to make in the greater interest of the world’s largest economy.

How do we reconcile our differences? Tax the dickens out of ‘em!

Read more

Viewers Still Tuning In To TV News

Results released this week by the Pew Internet Project, the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism, and the Knight Foundation show that many people still rely on their local news broadcast for information.

Local TV was named the “outlet of choice” for 55 percent of respondents while only 16 percent of respondents said it was the Internet. Breaking news and weather were the most popular topics cited. And African-Americans and Hispanics were most reliant on local broadcast news.

Read more

Media Undecided About Which Sites People Are Actually Reading

The media traffic wars are heated folks. It started, it seems, a couple of weeks ago, when the Pew Research Center’s Project for Excellence in Journalism released a study showing that The Drudge Report is a major traffic driver, trumping social networks. The Washington Post disputed this and The Huffington Post took a closer look at the reasons there may be some disparity in the numbers.

After a tumultuous redesign and resolving some SEO issues, Gawker chief Nick Denton is saying that traffic numbers are back to their previous highs. Last week, The New York TimesCEO Janet Robinson said more people are paying the new digital subscription fee than they thought, good news for its audience and share numbers. And now today, Yahoo is saying, “Check us out because everyone else seems to be.” (I’m paraphrasing there.)

So what the heck are people actually reading?

Read more

NEXT PAGE >>