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Posts Tagged ‘Robert Scoble’

Bros Behind ‘Yo’ Reveal Their Secret PR Sauce

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When the app that simply says “Yo” debuted a month ago, quite a few folks in media-land ran around like the proverbial headless chickens, proclaiming that the sky had finally fallen when such an obviously useless product earned so much coverage.

So how did the Yo bros score the placements that led to a million downloads in four days? They recently spoke to Ayelet Noff of Venture Beat to reveal their not-so-secret strategy.

Two words: Robert and Scoble.

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Is the Lightt App an ‘Instagram Killer’?

Mark Zuckerberg clearly made a wise move in acquiring Instagram. The social media reaction to yesterday’s story about a Manhattan restaurant’s brilliant new “Instagram menu” proves that the app is hugely popular—and we also recently learned that Instagram beats Twitter when it comes to mobile engagement.

But can a new social media photo app climb to the top of the heap? As Social Times reported this afternoon, tech guru Robert Scoble seems to think so.

This new entry on the pic-sharing scene is Lightt, an app that creates silent photo sequences resembling gifs, those classic visual loops that ruled the Internet a few short years ago. The key catch is that users can share these images with friends, and the app grants us the power to create crazy pseudo-videos from the photos taken by, say, a group of friends attending the same concert from different angles. Sound cool? This video is a little slow, but it does demonstrate how Lightt works if you have a minute:

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Don’t Miss the Discount for the Next Social Media Marketing Boot Camp

Wednesday, May 11 is the last day to take advantage of the early-bird discount available for mediabistro’s upcoming Social Media Marketing Boot Camp.

This online conference and workshop will span eight weeks, starting June 9. Join conference leader Jennifer Neeley (@jennifered) for keynote speeches, how-tos, and networking to help you successfully market your business (or your client’s business) using social media tools and platforms. Special guests will include Guy Kawasaki, co-founder of Alltop.comCharlene Li, founder of Altimeter Group; blogger, author, and tech evangelist Robert Scoble; and many more.

Click here for more information about the conference, the special discount, which can save you $100, and how you can get a free gift worth $149. Sign up today!

SXSW: To Launch or Not to Launch?


Edwyn Collins, one of this year’s SXSW acts.

If you’re involved in any way with music, film or digital media, you’re likely already beginning to get invites for events and read pre-event coverage of South By Southwest, the growing annual conference which kicks off on March 11th in Austin, TX.

One of the most popular questions asked in relation to the interactive portion of the conference is, “Which company will take off this year at SXSW?” The music equivalent is of course, “Which band will take off this year at SXSW?”

Many past conference goers talk about how 2007 was the year of Twitter, 2009 of Foursquare, etc. Both of these services had launched way in advance of SXSW, but the gathering served as an incubator to help them grow to a wider audience and take hold. As Twitter co-founder Evan Williams said, “We didn’t actually launch Twitter at SXSW — SXSW just chose to blow it up.”

This bears revisiting the question that has been asked in many a startup team meeting over the years: Should we launch at SXSW?

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Startup Suffers From Too Much Buzz

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Perhaps you’ve heard about Flipboard, the new mobile application that converts social media streams into an elegant, magazine-like presentation.

The app launched to much fanfare, receiving hype from the likes of actor Ashton Kutcher and tech-industry networker Robert Scoble. However, the flood of attention overwhelmed the company’s servers, leading people to a product that wasn’t available. Writes The New York TimesClaire Cain Miller:

…the bigger lesson learned, [Flipboard founder] Mr. McCue said, was how much Twitter has changed the game of public relations and introducing a new company since 1999, when he co-founded his previous company, Tellme, which was acquired by Microsoft.

As we have written about in The Times, introducing a start-up is no longer just about briefing the right reporters. It is also about ensuring that influential people, not just journalists, spread the message on Twitter and other social networking sites.

While the startup received attention from what some may say are all the right influencers, it couldn’t handle the response. It’s a problem some startups wish they had.

Robert Scoble on Being a Spokesperson and a Reporter

Beet.TV’s Andy Plesser just sent us this video interview he did with blogger Robert Scoble. It’s interesting how Scoble is one of the few in tech who have been able to walk the line between maintaining an editorial brand, and also being a paid spokesperson.

As Andy notes, “Robert is a full-time employee of RackSpace, the Texas-based enterprise hosting company. The job provides him financial support and editorial autonomy to travel the world to report for his blog and produce videos. Robert serves as the company’s ‘ambassador’ and PR rep in Silicon Valley.”

Join us this Thursday when Andy joins mediabistro for our “20 Tips in 20 Minutes” webinar series to speak on the topic “Using PR and Video to Amplify the Message.”

PR Pros To Facebook: Washington Post Good Choice For CEO Op-Ed

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Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg made perhaps his most public of statements today regarding recent concerns about the social network’s privacy settings: an op-ed in the Washington Post.

In the op-ed, Zuckerberg said the company “missed the mark,” regarding privacy controls, while adding, “We have heard the feedback. There needs to be a simpler way to control your information. In the coming weeks, we will add privacy controls that are much simpler to use.”

We asked several PR executives what they thought of the op-ed.

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PR Takeaways From The Google Nexus One Launch

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In the biggest product launch of this short year, Google yesterday afternoon launched their first ever smart phone, the Nexus One. So how did the launch go?

The reviews

Walt Mossberg of the The Wall Street Journal was mostly positive. The New York TimesDavid Pogue was more negative. “Google Phone Is Not Revolutionary,” read his headline. Engadget’s Joshua Toplosky said the launch generated, “legitimate excitement.” CNET’s Rafe Needleman said, “it’s a solid step in Google’s continuing assault on new markets in general and on Apple in particular, but it’s not revolutionary the way the iPhone was…”

“It’s like the Obama of phones. Whether or not he’s really a great president, he can’t possibly live up to expectations he originally set,” said David Berkowitz, Senior Director of Emerging Media & Innovation at agency 360i.

Why No Video?

Flatiron Communications founder Peter Himler wondered why “Google’s PR peeps didn’t go through the trouble of web-streaming their own news conference, while arranging for on-site attendees to record wirelessly, to ensure optimal site lines and audio.” Instead thousands watched a stream set up by blogger Robert Scoble.

“They did the video feed for arguably less meaningful launches like Google Wave,” said Berkowitz.

Courting “influencers”

The list of people receiving Google’s phone in advance wasn’t at all limited to journalists. For example, venture capitalist Fred Wilson received the phone several weeks ago.

Google PR guaranteed feels more “comfortable” giving the phone to Wilson than say Engadget or the Times, as his review is much more likely to be positive. It was.

Wilson does not regularly review tech products and receiving such a high profile gadget in advance surely leads to excitement that could perhaps skew a review. Also, as a tech investor and not a journalist, he is less likely to be critical of the product.

The relatively new concept of “influencers” – some hate the term – means more and more people from different professions getting “pitched” by PR firms than ever before. Even PR people with popular blogs, like Edelman’s Steve Rubel or FutureWork’s Brian Solis get pitched. Robert Scoble, who was invited to the press conference, is a paid adviser to hosting company Rackspace.

Apple crowding

Per usual, Apple made it’s best attempts to crowd the news-cycle as we reported. “I think Apple got themselves in to the news with the tablet, and while iPhone would have been in the articles, it got Apple top of mind as usual,” said POP! PR Jots blogger and tech PR executive Jeremy Pepper. Edelman’s Steve Rubel saw things more positively. “Google plus phone is a surefire for press coverage as Godzilla plus city,” he told us.

Hey TechCrunch, Enough With the Embargoes Already

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TechCrunch editor Mike Arrington is sick of being told by companies when the blog can break their news (also know as an embargo). Arrington first wrote about his disdain of embargoes last December and now says “the last has fallen” now that Google and Microsoft are “no longer able to hold embargoes.”

Nicholas Carlson, editor of TechCrunch competitor Business Insider, told PRNewser, “It’s not a Business Insider policy, but I tend to ignore embargoed stories unless they’re really huge news. It doesn’t do us much good to run with the same story as 9 other pubs. Readers probably benefit from getting a fast second take instead, too.” Another editor we spoke with who declined to be named wasn’t buying Arrington’s song and dance. “They [TechCrunch] routinely publish 10 minutes before an embargo,” he said.

Meanwhile, blogger Robert Scoble said, “I’m always shocked that PR people care in any way about this…” – he’s right – and gave “10 Ways to Screw up @techcrunch’s Embargo Policy.”

[image: jdlasica/Flickr]