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Posts Tagged ‘sad things’

Agency Fires Employee for Falling While Drunk

A not-so-sure-footed man earned some media attention on Monday for this incident, in which he slipped and fell off the upper deck at a Buffalo Bills game and landed on a fan in the section below (they’re both OK now).

Screen Shot 2013-11-19 at 6.20.07 PMIt was the sort of “funny ’cause it’s not me” moment that we Internet layabouts seem to love so much.

Yesterday, however, it got serious when reports revealed that the overly excited fan was also a creative director at Eric Mower and Associates, a New York-based ad/PR/marketing agency—and that the accident had cost him his job.

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David Rakoff, Writer and Humorist, Dead at 47

At the core of all PR is humanity, and David Rakoff understood humanity like no one else. His insights were naked and powerful, his life heartfelt and poignant. Boldly insecure and damned funny, Rakoff connected with people because he was honest about being sad. For Rakoff, being unhappy was OK, even normal. For many of us, this unwelcome truth was beaten out of us as children and replaced with Santa Claus.

As noted in this Gothamist post, Rakoff opened his most recent book, Half Empty, with the lines “We were so happy. It was miserable.” If that doesn’t make you laugh, then I’ve got some terrible news for you about Santa Claus. Rakoff wrote two other collections of essays, Fraud and Don’t Get Too Comfortable, in addition to publishing pieces in magazines from GQ to Spin. He was also a popular contributor to This American Life on NPR.

Rakoff’s death was especially notable because he treated his disease with humor, which is a form of courage we give to others to spare them our pain. Rakoff, born in Canada, was also a classic New Yorker—the kind of New Yorker who believed that art and its ability to bring together, and not money and its ability to separate, was at the core of the city’s soul. He will be missed. RIP David Rakoff. You can relax now.

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