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Posts Tagged ‘Sergey Brin’

Steve Jobs Is Now Bad for Apple’s Reputation

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To say that recent lawsuits have been terrible PR for Apple would be an understatement.

The company’s ongoing copyright battle with Samsung, for example, produced a string of internal emails between its marketing manager and its ad agency, TBWA\Chiat\Day, over “brand likability” and the failure of recent campaigns to elevate the iPhone over the Galaxy.

The other big suit going on at the moment concerns supposed anti-employee collusion between four top tech companies: Apple, Google, Intel and Adobe. The plan’s mastermind was Steve Jobs himself, but Apple would prefer that no one mention that fact at trial.

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Public Relations

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SNL Makes the Public Laugh about Google Glass

The hype around the release of Google Glass has been excruciating for much of the public. From bazillionaire Sergey Brin being “accidentally” spotted wearing the connected eyewear on New York City’s subways to the absurd, hip credentials and bank accounts early adopters must demonstrate before proving themselves worthy of an untested commodity, the whole Google Glass buzz machine has become tedious.

Enter Saturday Night Live and Fred Armisen and Seth Meyers, who, via a hilarious skit late Saturday night, nailed public sentiment. The Google Glass public relations blitz started strong but fell victim to its own unwieldy inertia by inundating the public with ubiquitous marketing efforts while only allowing select individuals access to the product. Backlash was inevitable.

Celebrities on NYC Subways Make for PR Gold

Google's Sergey BrinWhile regular commuters use New York City’s (in)famous subway system to get to work, the rich and the famous often use the subway when working in a public relations capacity.

For example: Jay-Z took the R Train to his own show at Brooklyn’s Barclays Center (a.k.a. Chez Jay-Z), and now Google co-founder Sergey Brin has been spotted on the 3 train sporting Google Glasses, which are basically the Internet on your eyes. Are they “everymen” now? Of course not. But we love them for it.

Though the public often has a complicated relationship with fame, we appreciate it when members of the more glamorous classes do “regular people” stuff like riding public transportation. Savvy PR professionals know that with the limitless social media platforms and digital devices out there, it doesn’t take long for someone famous on the subway to end up trending on Twitter. That’s valuable publicity for a mere $2.25.

Taking the subway demonstrates a connection with the public and the realities of our lives. Even star-struck commuters don’t reach for a pen and paper and ask, “Can I have your autograph?” They ask, “What are YOU doing on the subway?”

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Google Founder to PR Department: You Have Eight Hours of My Time This Year

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New Yorker columnist and author Ken Auletta released his latest book, “Googled: The End of the World As We Know It” earlier this month. The book, as the title implies, is a deep dive into the rocket ship paced rise of Google.

Auletta had access to Google co-founders Sergey Brin and Larry Page and quickly found out they’re not fans of PR. Engineers by background, the founders want to make every decision based on data, something not always possible in the “right brain” world of marketing.

In particular, Page told Google’s PR department in 2008 – which then consisted of 130 people – that he would only give them “a total of eight hours of his time that year for press conferences, speeches, or interviews,” wrote Auletta.