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Posts Tagged ‘Skechers’

California Chrome Has A Shoe Deal with Skechers

skechers california chromeSkechers, the makers of Fit Flops and the debunked Shape-Ups “fitness shoes,” has signed a marketing deal with California Chrome, such that the brand will be the apparel of choice of the thoroughbred’s handlers, will appear on California Chrome’s blanket, and will make its way to the winner’s circle if the horse wins the Triple Crown on Saturday. Sources say it’s the largest deal since UPS spent major bucks on a deal with Big Brown in 2008.

“We’re spending a couple bucks to the roll the dice and if this horse wins it all, we’ll be part of it,” said Skechers CEO Robert Greenberg. He said the company will spend about $175 million on marketing this year.

If California Chrome wins, it’ll be the first time in 36 years that a horse has taken the Triple Crown. For a company that expects to take in $2.2 billion this year, this is a gamble on history that is worth taking.

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4 Super Bowl ‘Rebranding’ Reviews: What Worked? What Didn’t?

Since today is officially Review the Super Bowl day, we thought we’d riff on a theme we saw in several of last night’s big-name ads: rebranding. The companies in question aren’t exactly hurting for money (except for one very notable exception), but they wanted to use the Super Bowl as a jumping-off point to refine and re-target their brands. So what worked? What didn’t? Let’s do some before-and-after comparisons, shall we?

Mercedes-Benz

Before: A luxury car brand synonymous with “incredibly rich (and usually evil) people”

After: A premium brand that’s still affordable for those of us a little lower on the social ladder

Did it work? Nice commercial but no. An “economy” model Mercedes is like a subprime mortgage: you can tell us it’s less expensive and convince us that we’ll be able to pay it off in twenty years of installments, but the fact is we still can’t afford it.

But hey, at least we didn’t have to watch Kate Upton try to act.

Click through for the rest:

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Can Crocs Make a Comeback?

Nothing exemplifies the unpredictability of public opinion more than the success of Crocs.

Crocs are the platypus of the shoe world. They look funny, but they’ve somehow managed to dominate a certain segment of the footwear market. Renowned for their vibrant color, orgasmic comfort and a fashion sense that combines the best attributes of a Nerf football and a kitchen strainer, Crocs have enjoyed an inexplicable level of popularity with the public–particularly the American public (we’re looking at you, Mario Batali).

While almost every other fashion line at least tries to combine both style and functionality, Crocs focuses on comfort above all else, and consequently revolutionized shoe design as a result. Most readers won’t be too surprised to learn that the original Crocs were designed as spa shoes. No one will ever win an Olympic competition in Crocs, but the line has made its way into mainstream life for many Americans.

Though the popularity of Crocs appeared to peak as their novelty factor faded, the company recently implemented a marketing strategy designed to re-brand its products as (wait for it) an upscale alternative to competitors—namely Skechers and Wolverine Worldwide—offering similar but less expensive shoes. Read more

Skechers Paying Millions To Settle Shape-Ups Lawsuit

Skechers is paying a $50 million settlement because Shape-Ups don’t work. Hahaha. I can’t.

They’ve set up a webpage for those who bought the shoes to file a claim, no proof of purchase necessary. You’ll get something in the $40 range for your trouble.

The settlement gave the Federal Trade Commission the chance to tell a funny: “The F.T.C.’s message, for Skechers and other national advertisers, is to shape up your substantiation or tone down your claims.” Boom.

For its part, Skechers still says the shoes work and that they only settled to avoid the higher cost of a lawsuit. They’re substantiating their claims with “studies” that the FTC says actually proved nothing. Click here to read the company’s statement.