TVNewser AgencySpy TVSpy LostRemote FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Sprint’

Don’t Call Russell Simmons’s New ‘Digital Marketing Company’ an Agency, OK?

If Jay-Z can pretend to be a sports agent then Russell Simmons can pretend to be a marketing guru, right? Sure — just don’t refer to his new company Narrative, which offers “digital marketing, entertainment and technology” services, as an agency.

Why not? Because Simmons and partner Tricia Clarke-Stone want to help agencies, not compete with them. How does that work? Narrative‘s founders say they will use its nascent creative team to produce the “marketing solutions” and digital campaigns that said agencies will then promote. The group already has a couple of clients in Sprint‘s Boost Mobile and Simmons’s own site GlobalGrind.

Simmons and Clark-Stone aren’t exactly new to the promo game — GlobalGrind doubles as a marketing company that’s already served some big-name clients like Pepsi, Tide and Toyota. They see their new venture’s purpose as filling a “gap” in an industry ill-equipped to serve a public for which “urban culture is [now] the mainstream” regardless of race, background or geography. But how can Narrative not compete with agencies when its service description sounds so similar to those of its prospective “partners?”

Simmons has obviously done great work in the past, and we don’t doubt his promotional prowess — but this is a strange rollout, no?

Mediabistro Course

Social Media 101

Social Media 101Get hands-on social media training in our online boot camp, Social Media 101! Starting September 4, social media and marketing experts will help you determine the social media sites that matter most to you, based on your personal and professional goals. Register before July 31 and get $50 OFF with early bird pricing. Register now! 

Sprint Manages to Run a Decent April Fools’ Campaign

So we’re not really into this whole April Fools’ thing. On the one hand, we are amused by the American Eagle “spray-on jeans” and the number of users who took to Twitter in an attempt to be the 1000th person to ask “Is this Google nose thing for real? I’ve been sniffing my laptop and I don’t smell anything.”

On the other hand, that is a little sad.

So back to our point: we kind of like Sprint‘s Sprint Specs campaign, not because it’s so incredibly clever but because it manages to make fun of a trending tech story (Google Glass) while simultaneously promoting its service’s key differentiator: unlimited data. It’s really every bit as forced as every other April Fools’ joke, but it somehow manages to be a competent promo as well.

How Is IBM America’s ‘Greenest Company?’

After reading The New York Times expose about the incredible amounts of energy wasted in the data centers of “environmentally friendly” Internet juggernauts like Facebook and Google, we have to admit we’re a little surprised to learn that tech brands dominate Newsweek’s list of the “greenest” companies in America year after year.

This year, in fact, IBM and Hewlett-Packard retained the top two spots, followed by Sprint Nextel and Dell. We had to check our calendars: Is it 2012 or 1997?

How did IBM achieve its somewhat enviable position atop the green heap? We won’t get into Newsweek’s extensive methodology, but the report notes two particular projects: The Smarter Planet initiative helps IBM clients analyze their consumption of resources in order to make for more environmentally efficient businesses, but we’re more interested in the company’s Zurich Research Laboratory.

In 2008, the Swiss techies pioneered a “zero carbon emission data center” that works by redirecting the massive amounts of waste heat generated by all those buzzing hard drives and using it to regulate the temperatures of buildings and create a “municipal heating network”. Most importantly, the system uses the heat to more efficiently cool the chips themselves–so IBM truly recycles its own energy.

OK, that’s pretty cool.

Read more

Should You Use Google+ Or 3D Technology In Your Campaign?

Timothy Jordan’s keynote to start yesterday’s day two of the PRSA Digital Impact Conference was basically a pitch to the room, explaining why Google+ is a must-have for any campaign that wants to interact with people.

Jordan, a developer advocate at Google, focused on hangouts and circles, data and apps, and Ripples, which sends your message out to groups and groups of groups. All to show that Google+ is a great way to reach people and keep them interested. He did this while repeating the phrase “I have nothing to announce” many times.

Read more

AT&T/T-Mobile USA Deal Getting Bad Press

AT&T execs sounded confident on a conference call hosted on Monday to explain the goodness of their plan to purchase T-Mobile USA. That optimism will have to hold up against the hits the deal is taking as it heads to Washington for consideration.

Media outlets have reported on the possible ramifications and the very real opposition to the acquisition all week (and it’s only Wednesday).  The New York Times reports on some analyst predictions that the merger will result in consumers paying more for service.

“The bottom line, they said, is that competition is likely to suffer, leading to higher prices and less innovation,” Jenna Wortham writes. Other analysts have a more optimistic outlook, saying that service and coverage could improve.

Read more

Companies Enlist ‘Digital Detectives’ for Social Media Programs

At the International Association of Business Communicator‘s (IABC’s) Corporate Communication and Social Media Summit on Friday, presenters from Whirlpool, Sprint, and Pfizer discussed how their companies have used social media in a range of areas, from customer service and new product launches to employee and crisis communications.

Whirlpool has given unique job titles and descriptions to some employees involved in social media, according to Brian Snyder, senior manager of corporate communications. He said, “We took our team of ‘laundryologists’ out of the laboratory and put them on Twitter to address customers’ questions.”

“Whirlpool has also assigned ‘digital detectives’ to help distressed customers,” Snyder added. These sleuths search for comments about Whirlpool’s brands on Internet forums. When they notice customer complaints, they try to find the unhappy consumers and contact them to solve their issues.

Read more