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Posts Tagged ‘Stuart Elliott’

MWW Acquires West Coast LGBT Specialty Firm

MaciasNew Jersey’s MWW continued its ongoing expansion today with the acquisition of Macias Media Group, a Los Angeles firm that specializes in serving the LGBT audience. The move scored a mention in the New York Times via ad specialist Stuart Elliott.

Founder, namesake and former Here Media EVP Stephen Macias started the firm, which will become part of MWW, in September 2012. In his new role, Macias will work from the firm’s L.A. and New York offices as senior vice president and leader of the LGBT practice.

Here Media publishes The Advocate, Out, Out Travel and other gay-focused properties like Here TV and Gay.com, with recent big-name campaigns including promo for the Netflix original series Orange Is the New Black. Until the announcement Macias served as their agency of record; they will now be MWW clients.

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Expect a Lot of Sponsored Tweets and ‘Experiential Marketing’ During the Oscars

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Vanity Fair publisher Edward J. Menicheschi tells Stuart Elliott of The New York Times that “Oscar night is Vanity Fair’s Super Bowl“, and the mag will go all out this year to prove it.

The brands sponsoring the awards and the top two magazines covering them (VF and People) plan to stage “events” rather than simple advertisements or social campaigns. What will those events encompass?

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Here Are Our Favorite Super Bowl Odds and Ends

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So…two days left until the most important day of the year for branded promotions. The 6,329 “credentialed journalists” covering the event will make sure to inform you about every last detail of the game and related ads/stunts, but for now we thought we’d share some of our favorite football tidbits, sent to us by our friends in the industry.

First we have a couple of ways to make the game (and the ads) a little more fun.

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The New York Times Has Your Burson-Marsteller Rebranding Covered

Oh hi.

NYT advertising guru Stuart Elliott has seen the new Burson-Marsteller, and we can’t quite tell whether he’s impressed or not.

From the new tagline “Being More” to a revamped website and an inaugural series of “conversations” on disparate topics led by relevant “thought leaders”, Burson-Marsteller has undergone a fairly extensive re-branding to celebrate its 60th anniversary. The point of the shift as we read it is to emphasize the flexibility of the agency’s offerings. Some key quotes from its statement of purpose:

Being More means being more confident in our ability to communicate with more people, in more places, with bigger ideas, through constantly changing communications channels and with more impact.

One of the most exciting aspects of the times in which we live and work is that no one owns this model, because there are no boundaries.

Old distinctions between categories of paid, owned and earned media are fast becoming outmoded.

In other words: whatever you need done, we can do it—with an emphasis on content creation.

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Barbie Puts Her Malibu Dreamhouse on the Market

Barbie Mattel movingDid you know that Barbie split up with longtime beau Ken in 2004–or that her latest job descriptions include “computer engineer” and “architect“? (Paging Art Vandelay…)

Neither did we! Apparently the best-known property of the world’s biggest toy brand, Mattel, has been very active on social media while charting her steady climb up the career ladder. Girl power!

The company’s latest attempt to rekindle interest and pump up the sales numbers for everyone’s favorite “natural” blonde may also be its most elaborate. The centerpiece of this rebranding exercise–which will be managed by HL Group on the PR end–is Barbie’s decision to put her famous Malibu Dreamhouse up for sale (and no, we don’t mean the crazy life-size replica). It seems that Ken’s lady is looking to make a big move–but where will she go? Manhattan? Las Vegas? San Francisco? SALT LAKE CITY?!?!

It’s up in the air! And the campaign will include pretty much every element of the new interactive marketing/PR equation.

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Fleishman-Hillard Teaches Kids About Advertising

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The New York TimesStuart Elliott looks into a new campaign from the Bureau of Consumer Protection of the Federal Trade Commission, which will teach children:

…how advertising works so they can make better, more informed choices when they shop or when they ask parents to shop on their behalf.

Omnicom-owned Fleishman-Hillard is supporting the bureau on the campaign.

Elliott wondered if having a firm owned by a large marketing services company teaching kids about advertising represented a conflict.

David Vladeck, director of the bureau disagreed, and stated about Fleishman, “They also know the tricks of the trade…We’re tapping into their expertise.

Hunter PR Brings Parents To Work, Not Kids

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Do you work at an agency? Would you want your parents to meet your clients?

That is what’s happening today at Hunter PR in New York. The agency is reversing “Bring Your Kids to Work Day” with “Bring Your Parents to Work Day.”

The New York TimesStuart Elliott reports:

Events during the day will also introduce the visitors to the agency’s clients, which include Campbell Soup, Diageo, Gallo, Kellogg, Kraft, Tabasco and 3M. There will be wine and whiskey tastings, a look at recipes and a gift-wrapping demonstration, the latter to show off 3M’s Scotch Tape.

This should be interesting.

Super Bowl PR Winners and Losers

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[Coke teams up with The Simpsons for their Super Bowl ad.]

This is more AgencySpy’s territory, but PRNewser wanted to provide a quick recap of who “won” and who “lost” in last night’s Super Bowl marketing bonanza.

Winners:

Pepsi Refresh

Although the jury is still out on Pepsi’s decision to skip the Super Bowl in favor of a cause based social marketing campaign, Advertising Age reports that “pass or fail,” the campaign will be a “case for marketing textbooks.”

“It is surprising how much emotion is tied to the Super Bowl in terms of the industry and general public,” Chief Engagement Officer Frank Cooper told PRNewser last week in reference to how much press the brand has received for its choice not to buy an ad int the big game.

Bonin Bough, Global Director of Digital and Social Media for PepsiCo told AdAge that the strategy of using a TV spot and then making that spot into an online or Facebook strategy “does not exist anymore. That is not relevant whatsoever.”

Indeed, very few brands used their commercials as a vehicle to drive traffic to social sites. Did you notice that hardly any commercials promoted Facebook, Twitter or Youtube links?

AdAge reports that agencies Huge, Firstborn, Tribal DDB and VML have all picked up Pespi business in the last few months. Add that to the list of agencies PRNewser has confirmed to be working on the campaign — TBWA, R/GA, Epiphany/Porter Novelli, Edelman and Weber Shandwick — and that brings the total to ten PR and advertising agencies.

Google

Google’s simple ad seemed to have the highest emotional connection with views.

“We didn’t set out to do a Super Bowl ad, or even a TV ad for search. Our goal was simply to create a series of short online videos about our products and our users, and how they interact. But we liked this video so much, and it’s had such a positive reaction on YouTube, that we decided to share it with a wider audience,” wrote Google CEO Eric Schmidt in a blog post. Just the fact that Google advertised in the Super Bowl will get the company a slew of press.

The Late Show with David Letterman

The ad featuring Jay Leno, Oprah Winfrey and David Letterman is getting lots of buzz, for obvious reasons.

Focus on The Family

Regardless of where you stand on the issue, the group’s ad garnered a ton of media attention. “By setting up an expectation that it was going to do something controversial, Focus made it easy to come off as moderate and inclusive by comparison” writes Jeff Bercovici at Daily Finance.

Losers:

GoDaddy

The domain seller’s ads were predictable, yet not memorable. What does GoDaddy do again?

The U.S. Census Bureau

2.5 million of our tax dollars for that? The Bureau had to issue a press release defending itself against criticism.

Additional notes:

The New York TimesStuart Elliott live-blogged the ads.

• Agency Mullen and monitoring vendor Radian6 also hosted “BrandBowl” which examined 98,656 tweets from ad and marketing types. These Tweets, “provided an overall ranking of the brands advertising on the game based on a composite score that takes into consideration both volume of tweets and sentiment (both positive and negative).”

• AgencySpy will have more commentary today as well.

Leave your take on who “won” and “lost” in the comments.

NYT Calls Out Ketchum for Giving WSJ Exclusive on New Wendy’s Marketing Campaign

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Breaking a news story with only one publication, often referred to as an “exclusive,” is common practice in the PR world. The upside is that you are pretty much guaranteed coverage in a publication, if you work out an agreement with a reporter. The downside is that you’re likely to annoy other reporters covering that beat who know you chose their competitor over them.

Case in point: Ketchum is handling PR for the launch of fast food chain Wendy’s new marketing campaign. It’s a pretty big story for advertising and marketing reporters. They chose to give the story exclusively to The Wall Street Journal, which as you can imagine, didn’t please other reporters, one of which went forward with the story anyway. Writes the TimesStuart Elliott:

Wendy’s declined to discuss the campaign because executives at the company and at the Ketchum unit of the Omnicom Group, the outside public relations agency for Wendy’s, arranged to give the story exclusively in advance to The Wall Street Journal.

Oof. Elliott gives a full recap on the Time‘s Media Decoder blog.

Advertising Week Opening Night: “It’s Not Just the Ad Trades Anymore”

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AOL CEO Tim Armstrong, Fox Interactive head Jonathan Miller, R/GA founder Bob Greenburg, Interpublic CEO Michael Roth, Crispin Porter and Bogusky’s Chuck Porter, and many more we didn’t immediately identify were on hand for Advertising Week’s Opening Gala last night. (We were on AgencySpy’s turf, after all.)

The event moved this year to Times Square from Rockefeller Center. Bonus: use of giant flat screen in Times Square. Minus: The opening video played on the flat screen had an error and instead just showed random images of the crowd and podium.

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Sunshine & Sachs, who is handling all PR for Advertising Week, had a team on hand, including partner Shawn Sachs. One S&S employee told PRNewser that the “Crash Test Dummies” costumes (pictured above alongside other brand icons in the Madison Avenue Advertising Walk of Fame portion of the event) were actually filled by S&S staffers. She was kind enough not to reveal their identities.

PR man (he still runs an agency, Plesser Holland Associates) turned video blog founder (Beet.tv) Andy Plesser had his video gear set up in the middle of it all. After the Time‘s Stuart Elliott declined him an interview, Plesser was quick to remind us that Beet.tv is up for an OMMA Award in the “Video-sharing” category. He said the site is doing “more original video than just about anyone as far as I can tell,” with 150,000 video views a month and recently inked distribution deals with TechCrunch and Huffington Post.

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Back to Sunshine & Sachs – the agency found itself managing yet another busy day of events. Sachs informed us that Ken Sunshine was at another client function, a ribbon cutting at the new permanent site for the Frank Sinatra school of arts featuring Tony Bennett and Susan Benedetto. S&S also managed a press conference for the innovative $1M Netflix contest, which pitted teams of engineers in a three-year contest to improve the site’s movie recommendation system. The press conference drew coverage in hundreds of outlets.

Sachs told PRNewser, “Companies announcing news around it [Advertising Week] is a vital sign that you have a living event.” Heather Lylis, who runs the Advertising Week account for Sunshine & Sachs said they had registered more than 200 press and that people had flown in from across the country. “It’s not just the ad trades anymore,” she said, citing involvement from CNBC, Bloomberg, BusinessWeek and The Wall Street Journal.

[Photo Credit: Matt Van Hoven]