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Posts Tagged ‘Vanity Fair’

Monica Lewinsky Says Her ‘History’ Stopped Her From Getting Comms Jobs

monica lewinskyWell this is a blast from the past if there ever was one! Monica Lewinsky swept onto the Internet today with a preview of the Vanity Fair article that the magazine will be releasing digitally on May 8. And there are already some interesting bits in there about her life in the 10 years since we all became familiar with her name and her blue dress.

First, and perhaps this shouldn’t be shocking, but she’s 40 years old! In the minds of people who remember her from her days as the infamous intern, the thought of her aging that much just seems strange. But even now, the humiliation she must’ve felt (and had been made to feel) is palpable.

“”[T]hanks to the Drudge Report, I was also possibly the first person whose global humiliation was driven by the Internet,” she writes.

When she talks about the relationship with President Clinton, she has a perspective that has clearly also come with time:

“Sure, my boss took advantage of me, but I will always remain firm on this point: it was a consensual relationship. Any ‘abuse’ came in the aftermath, when I was made a scapegoat in order to protect his powerful position. . . . The Clinton administration, the special prosecutor’s minions, the political operatives on both sides of the aisle, and the media were able to brand me. And that brand stuck, in part because it was imbued with power.”

The brand stuck so much, in fact, that it prevented her from getting jobs later on. Among them, jobs in communications and branding at charitable campaigns.

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Expect a Lot of Sponsored Tweets and ‘Experiential Marketing’ During the Oscars

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Vanity Fair publisher Edward J. Menicheschi tells Stuart Elliott of The New York Times that “Oscar night is Vanity Fair’s Super Bowl“, and the mag will go all out this year to prove it.

The brands sponsoring the awards and the top two magazines covering them (VF and People) plan to stage “events” rather than simple advertisements or social campaigns. What will those events encompass?

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Gossip Writers: Social Media Made Celebrity Image Management Easier Than Ever

i.2.scandal-manual-gossip(George) Rush and (Joanna) Malloy were two of America’s best known old-school gossip columnists, but they decided to call it quits three years ago? Why?

In a complaint that will sound familiar to every journalist everywhere, they say they’d had it with celebs’ newfound ability to manage their images more effectively with social media, thereby reducing the value of the honest-to-goodness journalists who write regular columns in print (even if those columns are all about drug addictions and affairs and other gutter-hugging topics).

Oh, and they wanted to write a book that they then promoted with this Vanity Fair interview.

Some quotes:

“Keeping up with the Kardashians and other reality stars became nauseating. More and more, celebs were able to use social media to sidestep the columns, and most of the traditional media. They could spin their own version of the truth.”

“If I wanted to go into marketing, I would have gone to business school.”

In other words, celebrity news and marketing are now one and the same—right, Kim?

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Vanity Fair No Longer Gives Good Press

Vanity Fair apparently landed in the Hollywood doghouse faster than you can say “Tom Cruise Katie Holmes Scientology.”

You don’t have to take our word for it; just ask Gwyneth Paltrow, who told her actor/publicist friends to stop working with the mag back in June after she soured on a planned cover story.

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Roll Call: MWW, AOL, INTEGRATE and More

MWW announced that Ryan Wallace has joined the firm’s technology industry practice as vice president, enterprise and technology. Wallace, who will be based in New York, brings more than a decade of B2B technology experience. He comes to MWW from Bite Global, where he led the New York office and oversaw global strategy for the firm’s clients including Plantronics, SAP and other enterprise and start-up brands. As part of his role within the enterprise and technology group, Wallace will help oversee the development and management of integrated communications programs that help boost brand relevance via a combination of paid, owned and earned strategies.(Release)

Nate Richardson has been named president of AOL’s AOL Live, its live streaming video site. Richardson was previously the co-founder and CEO of Waywire, a video curation service he created along with Mayor Cory Booker. Prior to his time at Waywire, Richardson served as president of Gilt City. Richardson also previously served as CEO of ContentNext Media Inc., which owns paidContent.com. (FishbowlNY)

INTEGRATE announced the appointment of marketing executive Scott Vaughan as chief marketing officer. In this newly created role, Vaughan is responsible for marketing and go-to-market strategies to engage and support INTEGRATE’s rapidly growing base of customers. Prior to INTEGRATE, Vaughan served as chief marketing officer at UBM Tech where, under his leadership, the company reinvented its marketing approach and developed integrated programs and services to serve business and technology professionals and the marketers trying to reach them. (Release) Read more

Taylor Swift Shows the World How Not to Take a Joke

Note to Taylor Swift: if you’re looking to improve/maintain your reputation or get more sympathy from the public regarding your perpetual boy troubles, engaging in bitchy spats is probably not the best way to go about it.

Responding to Tina Fey and Amy Poehler‘s (completely appropriate) Golden Globes joke warning her to “stay away from Michael J. Fox’s son” lest he turn up in thinly-veiled caricature on her next album, Swift dropped this bomb on her Vanity Fair interviewer:

“You know, Katie Couric is one of my favorite people, because she said to me she had heard a quote that she loved, that said, ‘There’s a special place in hell for women who don’t help other women.’”

Yes, those two are such Regina Georges, aren’t they? Oh, and that quote was from former secretary of state Madeline Albright, who doles out wisdom in between her free jazz drumming sessions.

Poehler and Fey’s responses displayed their superior media relations savvy.

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More Changes for Condé Nast’s Communications Team

Conde Nast logoThis week brings more evidence that publishing giant Condé Nast is remaking its PR/communications team for the new year. Last month we reported on the departure of Maurie Perl: industry leading light, Barbara Walters confidant and veteran of such titles as Vanity Fair and The New Yorker.

Now we’ve learned of another big-name departure–and the arrival of some new blood.

Shannon Eis, who led internal and executive communications at Condé , left last week for a new role as senior vice president of corporate communications at top PR firm MMW. Eis previously worked as senior vice president at Kaplow Communications (and yes, she will continue making regular appearances on The Late Show With David Letterman as a parenting expert).

This week brings news that Patricia Röckenwagner has been named Condé Nast’s senior vice president of communications. Industry vet Röckenwagner previously served as senior VP of marketing and communications for McGraw-Hill Companies and corporate comms director at Paramount Pictures.

It would appear that Condé Nast is reshaping its communications team as part of a larger strategic shift. Expect more announcements to foll0w.

Big-Name Publicist Maurie Perl Leaving Condé Nast

Conde Naste vet Maurie PerlIn Industry Insider News, one of the New York media world’s biggest PR names has announced a major career change. Maurie Perl has a long history performing public relations work for some of the publishing industry’s best-regarded titles including Vanity Fair and The New Yorker.

Women’s Wear Daily goes so far as to call her “Condé Nast’s most powerful gatekeeper”; she spent more than two decades at the company performing PR duties for such names as David Remnick and Tina Brown and mentoring much of the industry’s younger talent. Before joining Condé Nast she worked at ABC News alongside Barbara Walters and others.

Brown says “She’s more than a publicist. She’s a consiglieri. No one can see all the angles like her”. Tough to find greater words of praise for anyone in the business.

Earlier this week an internal email revealed that Perl would be leaving as a result of Condé Nast’s decision to hire the Rubenstein agency for all media relations concerns. This move comes about because the company looks to further establish itself in “the scripted TV and feature films arenas”. Robert Green, executive producer of Huffington Post Live, will be the company’s new senior vice president.

No word on next steps for Perl, who has “no intention of retiring.”

Quotation Approval: PR No-No or Standard Practice?

Media personalities have made a bit of hay this week over the fact that the White House requested and received the right to review and approve of all the quotes that appeared in Michael Lewis’s upcoming Vanity Fair article on the president and his team.

Sounds like a media scandal, right? Well, not really. According to The New York Times columnist David Carr, quote approval is nothing but standard operating procedure–and it’s hardly limited to the world of politics. Subjects ranging from Wall Street super-bank CEOs to Silicon Valley tech pioneers and even startup managers have grown used to getting their way when it comes to press coverage. According to Carr and his colleagues, key contacts now expect “the kind of consideration that would have been unthinkable 20 years ago.”

In other words, journalists may have trouble accessing important figures unless they agree to this new kind of relationship, quotation approval rights and all. The practice may clash with classic journalistic ethics, but it’s part of the media landscape now. The Times claims that it will begin pushing back harder against this sort of behavior among its reporters, but from where we sit it looks a whole lot like everyday SOP.

We can only assume that this practice occurs at all levels of the PR industry. When does it become an ethical problem?

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Donald Trump Says Nothing, Hogs Spotlight

Donald Trump isn’t much for nuance or insight, but he manages to stay in the news somehow—in many cases without the aid of a publicist. We can’t even remember the last time he hawked a real product beyond his own golden-hued face.

Trump showcased his crude PR savvy yet again yesterday by announcing, via his Twitter feed, that he is planning a “big surprise” for the upcoming Republican National Convention. And of course this tweet was catnip for poli-bloggers. Sounds a little fishy–everybody already knows about Chris Christie.

Vanity Fair’s Juli Weiner thinks Trump’s bombshell might involve scissors, glitter, pipe cleaners and macaroni (we always preferred the star-shaped pasta). And Donald, if you’re listening, we feel like Newt Gingrich would make a great addition to the next season of Celebrity Apprentice. He can do his usual routine: condescend to everyone and get cheers for it.

So what do you think? Does The Donald have anything interesting up his sleeve, or is this “announcement” more of the usual smoke and mirrors?

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