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Posts Tagged ‘Weber Shandwick’

Roll Call: Weber Shandwick, MKTG INC and Kingstar Media

Weber Shandwick announced it has named Cathy Calhoun to the new global role of chief client officer and Sara Gavin as president, North America, effective immediately. Calhoun, previously Weber Shandwick’s president, North America, has been with the firm for 21 years. She is charged with deepening relationships with key clients across practice areas and geographies. Gavin, previously president of Weber Shandwick’s Minneapolis office, has been with the firm nearly 30 years. In that time, she has served key clients across North America as she has built an operation renowned for its expertise in financial services, government, agriculture, consumer work and digital innovation. She will be responsible for the firm’s operations across the U.S. and Canada. (Release)

Also at Weber Shandwick, Susan Howe has been named president, Global Consumer Marketing, and Rana Komar has been named general manager for the firm’s Chicago office, effective immediately. Howe, previously Weber Shandwick’s president, Chicago, has been with the firm for 17 years. She will oversee the firm’s largest practice area, bringing her global experience in consumer marketing, PR and digital to bear on behalf of clients. Howe will be responsible for building client relationships globally and helping to expand the Consumer Marketing practice’s reach.

Komar has been named general manager of Chicago, the firm’s third largest operation. Komar has been with Weber Shandwick for more than 13 years, most recently in leadership roles in the Chicago office and within the firm’s Consumer Marketing practice. She will now be responsible for several of the firm’s major consumer marketing and consumer health clients, including Mars and Novartis Animal Health, among others. (Release)

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The Institute for Public Relations Wants Your Best Social Media Studies

Got research? Enjoy a little healthy competition? Last week, the Institute for Public Relations issued a challenge to PR pros well-versed in social media practices: choose the tenth study in the organization’s “Top 10 Social Media Articles Important to Public Relations from the First Half of 2013” list.

Everyone likes research, and based on the email pitches we receive every day we can guarantee you that there’s no shortage of social media analysis (or related infographics) floating around.

So far the list includes everything from Edelman‘s Global Entertainment Study to general studies on marketing practices and Pew‘s latest social demographics report. PR pros from firms like Weber Shandwick and Ogilvy have already nominated their own studies in the comments. Do you have another to share?

Study: Millennial Moms are Highly Connected and Influential on Social Media, But Neglected by Marketers

Think all moms can be lumped into a “mommy category” when it comes to marketing demographics? Think that young mothers are too busy balancing home-life, career and baby to interact with people (and brands) on social media? On both counts, you’d better think again.

New research done by Weber Shandwick shows that “Millennial Moms” (mothers born between 1978 and 1994) are both highly connected and highly influential on social media, and yet marketers have thus far failed to fully tap into this potentially potent demographic.

These women, who account for 22 percent of North American mothers, use an average of 3.4 social media accounts, compared to 2.6 by other moms. They also spend 17.4 hours per week on social networks, which is four more than mothers of other generations, the study says.

Millennial Moms are also more likely to share information about goods and services, and do so both digitally and offline. Nearly three-quarters (74 percent) of Millennial Moms say they are sought out more often than other friends for advice on a wide range of topics. They are also more likely than the average mom to provide recommendations online. In an average month, Millennial Moms “like” or recommend products or services online 10.4 times, while the average mom only does so 7.7 times.

“Because Millennial moms are digital natives and grew up with the Internet more so than older generations, they have become accustomed to sharing more,” said Liz Rizzo, SVP at Weber and a lead developer on the research. And yet, despite their potential power, Rizzo also pointed out that this group of women — of which there are 9 million in North America — feels “overlooked by marketers.” Read more

Will PR Really ‘Rule Native and Social?’

Today in No, We’re Not Tired of This Debate Yet news: Phil Johnson, CEO of PJA Advertising, wrote a story for AdWeek arguing that the whole “moving into creative” trend means that “savvy PR firms” can and should steal social media and native advertising opportunities away from their competitors in the ad and marketing fields — and that those other guys will need to imitate the PR model in order to keep up.

Johnson writes that “forward-thinking public-relations firms have been more adept than advertising agencies at grasping the strategic implications of content marketing”. In making this point he cites recent moves by Edelman and Weber Shandwick as well as Digital Influence Group, “a full-service digital marketing agency with social media at the core”, and Shift Communications, which has been bullish on social for some time.

He also thinks that PR firms have an inherent advantage because native advertising “is conceptually the same as placing press releases that look like independent journalism.” Hmm…

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SEC Issues New Social Media Rules for CEOs

Remember when the SEC threatened to put the smack down on Netflix CEO Reed Hastings for revealing in a Facebook post that his company had achieved a record one billion hours of video streamed in a single month? The organization claimed that he was revealing confidential business info in order to bump up his company’s stock prices, but they’re totally cool with it now.

The organization laid out some new guidelines for CEOs who want to be more active on social media (a course strongly recommended by Leslie-Gaines Ross of Weber Shandwick).

There’s nothing too crazy here — just a realization that the rules regarding business disclosures need to take a step into the 21st century.

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How Important Is Oreo-Style ‘Real-Time Marketing’ Now?

After the Oreo team’s big social media win dominated the post-Super Bowl buzz, a whole lot of people who had never used the phrase “real-time marketing” before started throwing it around like a hot potato.

The point is that pretty much any business whose description includes the words “firm” or “agency” now needs to claim that it has “real-time marketing capabilities” in order to win the interest of big-name clients. McCann Erickson, for example, named its new social media-only division “McCann Always On”. The “RTM” phrase doesn’t just apply to agencies that label themselves “ad” or “marketing”, either — PR wants to “own” social media too, remember?

The problem is that the whole phenomenon just isn’t that simple — and it’s not too terribly revolutionary either. Explaining that to clients, however, may be a bit of a challenge.

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Digital Agency Trends Are Way Ahead of Us

In case you missed it, last week we posted a series of stories on the new transition toward a PR business model with a far heavier focus on digital branding and content creation services.

First Weber Shandwick EVP Jason Wellcome discussed the firm’s decision to formally create and publicize a new digital content unit called Mediaco after nearly a decade of providing more explicitly content-focused services for clients. Then Edelman PR content strategist Steve Rubel told us about his firm’s plan to address clients’ changing demands by simply doing more of what they’ve been doing for years — integrating new creatives into the larger Edelman team rather than launching and promoting a new entity.

Their observations seemed to support our conclusion that the classic “Is it PR, marketing or advertising?” debate would only grow more intense in the months and years to come. We found this all quite fascinating, but some people who’ve worked in the industry longer than we have let us know that these revelations were not really news at all with a collective “meh.”

A new study completed by Second Wind, provider of resources across the interlocking communications disciplines, tells us that they are (of course) correct.

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Edelman’s Content Strategist Explains the New ‘Content Marketing’ Model

Steve RubelThis week we posted on Weber Shandwick‘s decision to publicize its new content-creation wing, Mediaco, and what that means for the future of PR. This morning we had the opportunity to speak with Steve Rubel, chief content strategist at Edelman PR, to go over how his firm is addressing this newest chapter in the ongoing “PR vs. marketing vs. advertising” debate.

How does the Weber Shandwick announcement relate to recent “creative” moves by Edelman?

There’s a lot of hype in the never-ending hunt for shiny objects in marketing, but the bigger picture here is that the economics of the industry have changed – demand side platforms (ad exchanges) have made advertising more efficient, which caused the price of CPM (cost per impression) and ads themselves to plummet. This is good for the industry but bad for publishers, because media outlets squeezed by tech developments can’t make the leap to other revenue streams like subscription, video, etc.

This has led to a greater willingness to open their platforms to branded/sponsored content, thereby empowering marketers to make good on their longtime desire tell their stories their own way on some of world’s largest websites (Ed. note: see The Washington Post). That is the big change here.

Some people say this is all old news. How do you respond to that point?

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Weber Shandwick EVP Talks Content Creation and the New PR Model

Yesterday we posted on Weber Shandwick‘s new unit Mediaco, which will focus on creating and distributing content for clients. Today we had the chance to talk to Jason Wellcome, the Weber digital EVP who will run the new unit, on exactly what his teams do — and what this development means for the PR industry.

Here’s the firm’s promo video:

In our conversation, Wellcome gave us a little more detail on the strategy and its implications:

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The Next Chapter in the ‘PR vs. Marketing vs. Advertising’ Debate Is Here

Obvious statement of the day: the debate over who “owns” content marketing, native/paid media and social will only heat up in the months and years to come as agencies fight (politely) for clients’ money. But the latest chapter in this timeless face-off appears to be unfolding in record time.

First comes news that big-name ad agency McCann Erickson will significantly expand upon a unit it founded last year to exclusively tackle social media projects. The unit, now called “McCann Always On” (get it?), will “[build] social media-centric marketing plans” rather than just managing clients’ pages and feeds in an attempt to back up the agency’s “sure, we can do that!” claims.

This announcement follows a telling New York Times article by advertising specialist Stuart Elliot, who reported that a growing number of ad/marketing copywriters have mastered the subtle art of “LOLspeak” as their agencies integrate more social content into client campaigns.

On the PR side, Weber Shandwick just announced its plans to expand upon the traditional definition of a PR firm by launching a new content-focused unit called MediaCo.

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