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Posts Tagged ‘YouGov’

STUDY: Consumers Don’t Trust Your SEO, Social Media Marketing

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Is this guy even real?

Want to push your client’s negative reviews down in the search rankings and encourage consumers to leave positive feedback in public?

Of course you do. Unfortunately, consumers know this–and according to a survey released this week by YouGov, Bloomberg and the UK-based Chartered Institute of Marketingthey don’t like it very much:

  • 67% of consumers think using SEO tricks “to hide negative content within search results” is unethical
  • Only 38% of marketers agree

We’ll just say the average Joe on the street has very mixed feelings about some of the most popular digital tactics of the day.

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STUDY: Doritos, M&M’s and More Score Perception Bumps with Super Bowl Previews

You may have heard that there’s a sporting event coming up this Sunday and that every brand in the world wants to make the most of it.

Everyone in the PR/marketing/advertising world wondered whether this year’s decision to allow the public to watch full ads before the game would help the brands that participated, and a new survey from our friends at YouGov confirms that it did, indeed.

Doritos is the top “improver” in all three of the study’s categories: word-of-mouth, online buzz and, most importantly, purchase consideration. While YouGov notes that Doritos included kids and animals in three of its whopping five ”Crash the Super Bowl” ads, researchers credit this brilliant spot for the bounce:

OK, that was pretty good. More winners after the jump:

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STUDY: 21% of Users Write Reviews for Products/Services They Have Never Tried

negative-reviewSometimes, products, services and companies fully deserve the harsh reviews they may get online–bad service, shoddy products and questionable business practices are all valid reasons to call out the culprits and warn others away from a potentially negative experience. Not only can such reviews act as a public service, but some are hugely entertaining (you’ve seen Amazon’s review page for these Haribo gummy bears, right?).

But what if the online reviews upon which customers are basing purchasing decisions are totally fabricated?

According to recent YouGov research, a surprising 21% (one fifth!) of Americans who have reviewed a product or service online say they have done so without ever buying, using or trying that product or service. Who would do this, you ask? Surely this is the behavior of young, bored, immature kids, right? Wrong. We’re talking adults, here. And not just any adults–parents. Read more

Amazon Is America’s ‘Most Favored’ Brand

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We probably shouldn’t have been surprised by the findings of YouGov‘s 2013 Top Buzz ranking survey. Despite the negative news about labor struggles, the release of tell-all tome The Everything Store, the non-existent profit margins and the persistence of the “Massive, Faceless Retailer Shutters Mom and Pop Sellers” narrative, Amazon scored quite a few media wins this year. How could we forget:

In short, the survey is a micro-portrait of the retail world: Walmart is the old school and Amazon resembles the future, like it or not.

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These 10 Brands’ Public Images Improved Most in 2013

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Yes, we’ve already offered readers our takes on 2013′s winners and losers via listicles galore. This post, however, is less about our personal overgeneralizations and more about research conducted by our friends at YouGov.

The survey in question sought to determine which brands’ public images had improved most dramatically in 2013, and its results may surprise you; they certainly surprised us.

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Survey Shows SeaWorld’s Reputation Damaged but Intact

It's gonna be OK. Not really though.

“It’s gonna be OK, boy (not really though).”

We’ve written a good bit about SeaWorld’s reputation struggles recently; we even included the company on our list of 2013′s “biggest losers“, because have you seen Blackfish? Damn.

You can’t always trust social media, though: a recent survey by YouGov‘s Brand Index shows us that the damage might not be quite as bad as we thought. In fact, it’s been “comparatively far milder than other recent major crises in the news.”

Surprised?

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UK Census Says the PR Industry Is a Smashing Success

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The news certainly isn’t all bad as we prepare for 2014. In fact, if we’re discussing the business of public relations then it’s quite good.

Back in September a study revealed that the American PR industry has grown stronger in the face of a still-struggling economy. The 2013 PR “census”, created by our colleagues across the pond at the Public Relations Consultants Association (PRCA) in collaboration with PRWeek and research firm YouGov, shows us that the same is true in the UK: the business is big, it’s growing, and it’s becoming more digital.

None of these findings are too terribly surprising, but they’re still worth a look.

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Sheryl Sandberg’s PR Push: Can Career Women Also Be Working Moms?

Photo by Jakub MosurConfession: we haven’t read Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg‘s Lean In: Women, Work, and the Will to Lead and we probably won’t. But we are very interested in the fierce debate that her recent press tour/PR push has ignited over the role of women in the workplace and the executive suite. It seems to be the most controversial media issue since every single journalist/blogger in the world debated the merits of HBO‘s Girls. We also think it’s relevant to a PR industry that is approximately 70% female.

Why? Because an increasing number of top PR firms will be led by women in the coming years. Sandberg’s thesis as we understand it is that the corporate world (including public relations) has made the act of being both a successful mother and a successful businesswoman incredibly difficult. She argues that success tends to lead to resentment but that, by resisting the urge to lead or “lean in”, many women limit their career opportunities in PR and other fields.

A significant portion of the public feels the same way.

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