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Chris Rock On The Sad State Of The NY Mets

Comedian Chris Rock was on The Late Show with David Letterman to discuss the start of the baseball season and the second base situation for the New York Mets.

My apologies to SportsNewser co-editor Alex Weprin and other poor (pun intended) Mets fans for what could be another long season.

Mediabistro Course

Mediabistro Job Fair

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Fight Camp 360 Airing Saturday On CBS

Fight Camp 360: Pacquiao vs. Mosley premiers Saturday at noon ET on CBS, marking the return of boxing to network television.

Similar to HBO’s 24/7, the documentary series follows Manny Pacquiao and Shane Mosley prior to their May 7 showdown from the MGM Grand in Las Vegas.

According to USA Today, the last time CBS aired a live boxing event was a Bernard Hopkins vs. Glen Johnson fight in 1997 (both men are still fighting) and the last time live boxing aired on a major network TV was NBC’s The Contender in 2005. Read more

ESPN To Air Documentary On Tim Tebow In January

It’s not often the No. 25 pick of the NFL Draft gets an hour documentary after less than one season.

But not everyone is Timothy Richard Tebow.

As part of ESPN’s Year of the Quarterback programming initiative, the network will air Tim Tebow: Everything in Between Jan. 6 at 7 p.m. on ESPN.

The documentary is a behind-the-scenes look at Tebow from the 2010 Sugar Bowl to the NFL Draft in April. ESPN is calling Tebow “one of the greatest underdog stores in modern football.”

Brett Favre can safely retire. ESPN has found its new media darling.

Big 12 Creating a Television Network?

On Friday, eight athletic directors from Big 12 schools met with Learfield Sports to discuss developing a Big 12 sports network. Although Texas A&M’s AD Bill Byrne said the conversation “was nothing out of the ordinary,” the gathering was the latest sign that the conference is getting serious.

The Big Ten started the trend in 2007, launching their own network. Commentors were originally skeptical, but it paid out $72 million to members schools in 2009 and other universities want to copy the plan.

The Big 12, which will lose Nebraska to the Big 10 in 2011 (partially because of network money) and Colorado in 2011 or 2012, needs to rally its schools to keep them from leaving. One problem: Texas’ rights aren’t managed by Learfield Sports, and the school reportedly wants to develop its own channel.

“If they can pull that off, my hat’s off to them,” Byrne said. “We’re just having preliminary discussions right now to gauge the level of interest.”

College sports continue their inevitable decline into being about money, money, money.