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Posts Tagged ‘Aaron Sorkin’

The Morning Ticker: Sorkin’s Apology, Walters Proclamation, Comcast Opposition

  • Aaron Sorkin is apologizing for “The Newsroom” and wishes he could have a do-over. Sorkin, who is working on the third and final season of the HBO show, explains.

  • Netflix is coming out against Comcast’s planned $45 billion acquistion of Time Warner Cable. Netflix argues the combined company will have “anti-competitive leverage.”

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How ‘Network’ Predicted the Future of TV News

NetworkIf you work (or have worked) in TV news, and we know many of you do, you’ve probably seen “Network,” the 1976 classic which takes a cynical look at the news business as fictional TV network UBS exploits its anchorman for corporate profit. (If you haven’t seen it, get to Netflix, stat.)

Today Dave Itzkoff, a culture reporter for The New York Times, is out with a new book about the film. The book’s title, Mad as Hell: The Making of Network and the Fateful Vision of the Angriest Man in Movies, includes the the outcry which would be immortalized in pop culture. “Network” won 4 Acadamy Awards, including one for Peter Finch who played the “Mad as Hell” anchorman and who died just weeks before the Oscars. (If you’ve seen the film, you’ll get the tragic irony).

Actor Rob Lowe, writing the New York Times Book Review calls the film “darkly funny and breathtakingly prescient” and says Itzkoff’s “engrossing, unfolding narrative contains the perfect amount of inside-baseball moviemaking stories and anecdotes about stars.”

MadAsHellItzkoffThe Wall Street Journal review covers how the film was received in the TV news world of the mid-1970s

The TV establishment was predictably infuriated. Though his daughter, an actress, had a small role in the film, Walter Cronkite issued increasingly dismissive comments, calling it “a rather amusing little entertainment.” Worse, “they cut my daughter’s part down to almost nothing.” In the midst of the storm, [screenwriter Paddy] Chayefsky wrote craven letters to Cronkite and his NBC counterpart, John Chancellor. “Please know,” he told Chancellor, “I never dreamed television people would be angry about the film”—showing that the screenwriter was either disingenuous or delusional.

USA Today calls “Mad as Hell” “absorbing and revealing,” noting that Itzkoff speaks “with some admirers who became prominent writers and TV personalities — among them Stephen Colbert, Aaron Sorkin and Keith Olbermann.” “You wish Chayefsky would come back to life long enough to write The Internet,” Sorkin says.

‘The Newsroom’ Ending After Third Season

The-Newsroom-HBO-The-112th-Congress-Episode-3-4-550x366The third season of “The Newsroom” will be its last, HBO announced this afternoon. The Aaron Sorkin series will begin production on its last season this spring and debut in the fall.

“The Newsroom” debuted in 2012 to mostly negative reviews. The second season followed the “News Night” staff as they reported (and then retracted) “Operation Genoa,” a fake story about a U.S. military operation that was inspired by a similar situation at CNN, “Operation Tailwind,” in the late 1990s.

A number of cable news personalities, including MSNBC’s Chris Matthews and CNN’s Ashleigh Banfield and S.E. Cupp, acted as consultants for season two.

The Evening Ticker: Banfield, Lawsuit, ‘CTM’

  • Toyota has signed on as a presenting sponsor of “CBS This Morning.” The automaker will sponsor the “Eye Opener” segment, and is also lending its name to the show’s signature glass green room, now called the “Toyota Green Room.”

Chris Matthews And Ashleigh Banfield Among ‘The Newsroom’ Paid Consultants

With season two of HBO’s “The Newsroom” right around the corner, The Hollywood Reporter reveals that HBO and Aaron Sorkin put together an all-star list of paid consultants to help make the show as “real” as possible.

Among the notable names: MSNBC host Chris Matthews (whose son Thomas Matthews is an actor on the show), CNN anchors Ashleigh Banfield and Natalie Allen (CNN is a sister network to HBO), MSNBC’s S.E. Cupp and Alex Wagner and former CNN and MSNBC president Rick Kaplan. The full list is here.

“I’ll be coming to you for everything from simple research questions to: ‘What kinds of conversations would there be about how to cover Trayvon Martin? Sandra Fluke? The contradictory stories about the circumstances under which Bin Laden was shot?’” he wrote in a lengthy welcome note to the group last fall.

THR also wrote a lengthy cover story about season two of “The Newsroom.” You can read it here.

Season Two Of HBO’s ‘The Newsroom’ Debuts Sunday July 14

The second season of HBO’s “The Newsroom,” which follows the fictional goings-on at “News Night” and Atlantis Cable News, will debut Sunday, July 14 at 10 PM.

According to HBO, “in the new season, the staff of ‘News Night’ chases a mysterious tip, which leads to a story that ultimately spins out of control.”

Some of the “real-life” stories featured on the show will be the Trayvon Martin shooting, and the GOP primaries and November election. We also know that Patton Oswalt will join the show as ACN’s VP of human resources, while Rosemarie DeWitt joins as a litigator defending the company in a wrongful-termination suit.

“The Newsroom” debuted on HBO last June to mixed reviews. Nevertheless, it was very quickly renewed for a season two. Aaron Sorkin created the show, which stars Jeff Daniels as anchor Will McAvoy.

Piers Morgan, Aaron Sorkin And The Cast Of ‘The Newsroom’ Walk Into The Paley Center…

CNN host Piers Morgan moderated the panel for the HBO series “The Newsroom” at the Paley Center For Media late Sunday. The Paley Center is in the midst of PaleyFest, which features panels and presentations of new and returning TV shows.

Morgan, Aaron Sorkin and the cast sparred a bit (in a friendly way, of course).

“I prefer to see Piers Morgan and Diane Sawyer on the news and not on a red carpet,” said Olivia Munn, a former G4 host who plays Sloan Sabbith on the program. “You turn on CNN, and people are putting themselves in the story … Journalism is about other people’s stories.”

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Today In CNN News

Following the bombshell day on Tuesday, more rumors, news and opinions continue to trickle in regarding CNN.

FishbowlDC reports that the network will be pruning more political contributors from its lineup, naming Roland Martin and Donna Brazile as likely candidates:

Should the calls come down, Brazile likely wouldn’t be too shell-shocked. She’s already got a sweet gig with ABC. Martin, on the other hand, has his “Washington Watch” program on TV One and is a senior analyst for the Tom Joyner radio show.

Deadline reports that CNN has acquired a new weekend series from Ridley Scott called “Crimes of the Century.” The series will examine major news events using cinematic style:
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Jane Fonda: ‘Newsroom’ Character ‘Rupert Murdoch that’s been marinated in a little Ted Turner’

Actress Jane Fonda is a guest on tomorrow’s edition of “Katie,” and among other things she talks to Katie Couric about her character on the HBO series “The Newsroom.” Fonda plays Leona Lansing, the CEO of Atlantis World Media, the parent company of Atlantis Cable News. Fonda, of course, was once married to Ted Turner, the founder of CNN.

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The Creator of Canada’s ‘The Newsroom’ Talks About A Certain HBO Program Of The Same Name

Are you a fan of “The Newsroom”? No, not the HBO show from Aaron Sorkin. I’m talking about the original program, the dark comedy that aired on Canada’s CBC in the late 90′s and early 2000′s.

The Daily Beast’s Soraya Roberts remembered the show, and reached out to its creator, Ken Finkleman, to get his take on the HBO program of the same name. As we noted last year, HBO applied for a trademark on “The Newsroom” in the U.S. Finkleman tells Roberts that he was approached earlier this year by HBO lawyers.

“I said, ‘My show is finished, I’m not going to do it again. If you guys want to do a show called The Newsroom, in terms of creative people being supportive of each other, absolutely go ahead and use that name. Because if the shoe was on the other foot and I called you, I would want you to give it up as well,’” Finkleman says.

When asked if he gave his blessing for HBO to use their title, Meyboom, who co-owns the rights to Seasons 2 and 3 of The Newsroom with Finkleman (CBC owns Season 1), told the Beast via phone: “I don’t want to comment about that.”

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