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Posts Tagged ‘advertising’

The Problem with Politicized Programs: Ad Sales

In his New York Times Magazine cover story about Fox News host Glenn Beck, author Mark Leibovich writes about Beck’s ratings, and touches upon the problem the show has had with advertisers:

His show now averages two million viewers, down from a high of 2.8 million in 2009, according to the Nielsen Ratings. And as of Sept. 21, 296 advertisers have asked that their commercials not be shown on Beck’s show (up from 26 in August 2009). Fox also has a difficult time selling ads on “The O’Reilly Factor” and “Fox and Friends” when Beck appears on those shows as a guest. Beck’s show is known in the TV sales world as “empty calories,” meaning he draws great ratings but is toxic for ad sales.

While the story is about Beck, the “empty calorie” problem is hardly unique to his show. Programs with a heavy political or ideological focus often have a hard time attracting blue chip advertisers.

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Mediabistro Course

Multimedia Journalism

Multimedia JournalismStarting September 25, learn how to create interactive packages with photos, audio, and video! Taught by a multiplatform journalist, Darragh Worland will teach you how to come up stories that would be best told in a multimedia format, and create original content for that package using photos, slideshows, and short video and audio pieces. Register now! 
 

Jason Whitlock Profiled In New York Times

Never did I expect to see the day Jason Whitlock profiled in the New York Times.

Especially after his now infamous three-hour rant against his former employer, The Kansas City Star.

But the FoxSports.com columnist was featured in the paper on Sunday, which has to be a sign of the apocalypse.

For sports media junkies, the profile touches on all the things you have come to known over the years about Whitlock – - from his days playing football at Ball State University to his short lived stops at ESPN and AOL.

The highlight of the profile though was this gem of a line from columnist Dan LeBatard of The Miami Herald:

“I try not to burn bridges, but he napalms them. He’s fundamentally unafraid.”

If that doesn’t sum up Whitlock, I don’t know what does.

2010 NFL Kickoff Delivers Record Ratings For NBC Sports

Update: Nielsen nationals are in, and the game drew 27.5 million viewers, the most for a regular season match-up since the Green Bay Packers took on the Dallas Cowboys in November, 1996.

NBC Sports released the followuing statement from NBC Sports & Olympics chairman Dick Ebersol:

“This record viewership speaks to the power of the NFL and our country’s extraordinary appetite for football,” said Dick Ebersol, Chairman, NBC Universal Sports & Olympics. “This time of year is very special for so many football fans. We were fortunate to be able to cover the story of Brett Favre and the Vikings return to New Orleans. And we fully embraced the opportunity to provide a showcase for the city of New Orleans and the proud people of the Gulf region to celebrate such a unique and meaningful moment.

“On the business side, this shows what can happen when we apply a strategic, multi-platform marketing approach to put a broad promotional blitz behind a project. We take tremendous pride in our ability to build a big, broad audience for our partners.”

Original story: Last night’s game 2010 NFL kickoff game between the New Orleans Saints and Minnesota Vikings delivered the best overnight ratings for any regular season NFL game since 1997, and the best ratings ever for a regular season game on NBC.

The game drew a 17.7 rating/28 share from 8:45 -11:45 PM ET. The last regular season game to do that well was in December 1997, when the Denver Broncos took on the San Francisco 49ers. That game drew a 19.3 rating/30 share.

Not surprisingly, among the metered markets, New Orleans and Minneapolis led the way in terms of viewers.

Final ratings for the game will be available later today…

NFL Commish "Not Proud" of Swearing

Roger Goodell had to see this coming.

He’s “not proud” of the language used by New York Jets head coach Rex Ryan in HBO’s recently finished hit show, Hard Knocks.

“Obviously, at times, you’re going to get language that’s not appropriate for all ages,” he told Mike and Mike Wednesday morning. “It’s something that we’re not proud of, but it’s a reality of what’s happening in those camps.”

Goodell won’t penalize Ryan, however. Wait, NFL coaches swear? We’re shocked.

Tony Dungy previously criticized Ryan after which the Jets coach responded and then the pair cleared the air with a “man-to-man” chat.

This isn’t the first time swearing and coached have appeared in the newscycle together.

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"Athlete Dong:" A Sign of the State of Deadspin

“Of all the things I thought Deadspin would end up being known for, back in September 2005, “pictures of the typically large penises of professional athletes” would have not been high on the list. But art evolves, you know?”

And so begins Will Leitch’s first Deadspin HOF Nominee post of the year. It is, if nothing else, a perfect encapsulation of where the highly visible sports blog is headed (and, by extension, the road most of us will follow).

During the past year, the Gawker Media production has taken heat for some questionable journalist practices. From the ESPN horndoggery series to the Brett Favre-Jenn Sterger debacle, the blog drifts further and further into the tabloid sphere.

It wasn’t hard to see this coming. Read more