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Posts Tagged ‘Alan Murray’

The Morning Ticker: WSJ, Perino, Kelly

  • The Wall Street Journal is expanding its online video service in the coming weeks, adding a political talk show based in Washington, according to a memo obtained by Jim Romenesko. “WSJ Live” has had production quality comparable to many cable news programs. “There’s much more to come,” writes Alan Murray in the memo.
  • Fox News contributor Dana Perino is profiled by Woman Around Town. Her favorite New York City moment? “Memorial Day weekend as we walked by Times Square, the United States Marine Band was there jammin’ with songs from the Rolling Stones and Soft Cell. They performed right in front of the Armed Services recruiting station, and I will never forget the tears of joy and pride that spilled over as we cheered them on.”
  • “Live with Kelly” is still looking for a replacement for Regis Philbin, and it could be… you? Yes, the show is looking for normal people to serve as guest co-hosts for a day in the “Coast to Coast Co-Host Search.” You can read the rules and enter here.
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The Wall Street Journal Expands Live Video

NYT’s Brian Stelter talks with WSJ’s Alan Murray about the newspaper’s expansion of its live video unit, which yesterday released the new WSJ Live app while producing three and a half hours of live programming each business day — and soon more.

The Journal has expanded its video content in spite of its contract with CNBC, the leading business news network on television, and in spite of the fact that The Journal’s parent has its own business network, Fox Business. The CNBC contract expires in about 15 months, but already Journal reporters tend to appear more often on Fox than on CNBC.

If WSJ Live becomes available on more Internet-connected televisions and becomes recognized as its own sort of network, reporter appearances on the networks may become less meaningful.

Last summer, Murray — who’s been with The Journal since 1983 — told us about the growth of the video operations at WSJ. “Video is just an extension of what we do on a regular basis. It’s just a much richer interaction with our readers and users.”

Alan Murray on the Future of WSJ and Television

Wall Street Journal deputy managing editor and executive editor, online Alan Murray tells TVNewser the WSJ’s online video effort is already heading in the direction of a “Wall Street Journal Network,” but is not sure if we’ll see a future combination of WSJ and the Fox Business Network, both of which are owned by News Corp.

In addition to giving us his thoughts on the current state of television business news, Murray, who had a three-year stint as an anchor for CNBC, tells us the current TV partnership between that network and Dow Jones “doesn’t benefit either of them much at all” at the moment and it’s not likely at all that we’d see it extend past the 2012 end-date.

This is the third segment of our three-part interview with Murray for mediabistro.com’s Media Beat interview series.

Part I: WSJ’s Alan Murray Talks Online Growth

Part II: WSJ’s Alan Murray Explains What You Need to Know About Paywalls

Has The Economic Crisis Changed Financial News ?

MediaFin_12.30.jpgThis week C-SPAN is airing a panel discussion about the role of financial media during the economic crisis. Among the participants, Bloomberg TV’s Margaret Brennan and Alan Murray, deputy managing editor of The Wall Street Journal. Brennan and Murray are CNBC alum.

Former CNN correspondent Bob Franken moderated the discussion which was put together by the Miller Center of Public Affairs at the University of Virginia.

The panel examined whether the current economic crisis has changed the nature of financial news.