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Posts Tagged ‘CBS News’

This Week on the mediabistro.com Job Board: CBS News, BBC, Discovery

This week, CBS News is looking for a publicist for its morning programming, while BBC is seeking a communications coordinator. Discovery Communications is in need of a new art director, and Global National News is hiring a senior producer in Canada. Get the details on these jobs and more below, and check out additional just-posted positions on mediabistro.com.

For more job listings, go to the Mediabistro job board, and to post a job, visit our employer page. For real-time openings and employment news, follow @MBJobPost.

More changes at CBSNews.com

Eric Schurenberg has left BNET, the CBS Interactive site geared toward business professionals. Schurenberg had been BNET’s editor-in-chief and editorial director of CBSMoneyWatch.com. Content from CBSMoneyWatch.com and BNET will now be incorporated into CBSNews.com and those staffers will now report to Dan Farber who, on Friday, added CNET News to his editorial duties in addition to overseeing CBSNews.com.

Matthew Polevoy Out at CNNMoney.com, In at CBS News

Friday marks the last day in audience development at CNNMoney.com for Matthew Polevoy.

He moves on to CBS News, where he will handle social media for “CBS Evening News with Katie Couric.”

Polevoy, naturally, Tweeted the news with the accompanying picture from Time Warner Center.

Evening News Ratings: Week of March 14

A busy news week sent Americans to their TVs for the network evening newscasts, but the beginning of Daylight Saving Time has taken a hit on TV watching. The 6:30p-7p Households using television (HUT) level was down -7% week-to-week, while the People Using Television (PUT) levels among A25-54 viewers was down -9% and Total Viewers down -8%.

“NBC Nightly News with Brian Williams” won the week with 9.1 million total viewers, a +1.2 million lead over #2 ABC’s “World News with Diane Sawyer” who anchored her broadcast from Japan Monday and Tuesday. “CBS Evening News with Katie Couric“, which had low coverage on Thursday and Friday due to the NCAA basketball tournament, and was up the most of all three newscasts, +15% in total viewers verses the same week last year.

Numbers for the week of March 14:

NBC ABC CBS
• Total Viewers: 9,140,000 7,950,000 5,990,000
• A25-54: 2,810,000 2,240,000 1,890,000

Katie Couric: 90 days, One Decision (POLL)

So it begins. The window in Katie Couric‘s CBS contract has opened, which means she can entertain offers outside the Eye. She could also stay with the company in a renegotiated deal presumably earning less than the $15 million a year she reportedly makes.

The Hollywood Reporter’s Marisa Guthrie & Lacey Rose spoke with “two sources familiar with her plans.”

[S]he is believed to have begun conversations with Time Warner, NBCUniversal and CBS. Each of these entities offers a powerful syndication arm as well as a news outlet, which is said to be a particularly appealing, if not necessary, combination for Couric. If Couric were to move forward with a syndicated show — which is a “strong likelihood,” according to one source — it would premiere in fall 2012. That would make staying with the news through the next election, as many had predicted, impossible.

Former PageSix editor Richard Johnson, now writing for the News Corp. iPad publication The Daily talked to an insider who says, “People are pitching her. It’s like baseball, and she’s a great free agent who is on the market.”

And Marketwatch.com’s Jon Friedman has his thoughts:

CBS, as the employer, should be holding the cards. If Couric left the anchor chair, the show would go on, and we’d see someone else in the job. Who knows? CBS, which has languished in third place in the ratings with and without Couric over the years, might even draw more viewers if she departed.

Of course, the syndication talk is nothing new.

Read more

What Anderson will look like: ‘We’ll use all the tricks of the trade. We’ll shoot stuff. We’ll go places.’

If Anderson Cooper were a car, he’d be a classic American convertible.

“Maybe it’s the silver hair. Maybe it’s the kind of work he does. I don’t think he’d be a Porsche,” says Jim Murphy, executive producer of Cooper’s upcoming daytime show. “He’s going to cover a lot of space and be very open to people watching.”

Murphy knows about covering space. Prior to joining ABC in 2006 as senior executive producer of ABC’s ‘Good Morning America,’ he did two e.p. stints at CBS, with ‘Evening News’ under Dan Rather, then Bob Schieffer; and ‘CBS This Morning.’

Murphy jumps to the syndicated ‘Anderson’ in mid-March. The talk show launches Sept. 12, replacing Oprah Winfrey in some markets. (No pressure.)

Though Murphy and Cooper barely know each other, in Murphy’s words, they have several mutual friends. “The funny thing is, they’ve said to both of us over the years that we’d make a really good team,” Murphy says. “I’ve admired the guy for a hell of a long time.”

As it turns out, the timing was perfect. Murphy, who turned 50 last year, was burning out and needed a change. He went to new ABC News president Ben Sherwood, who had been Murphy’s predecessor on ‘GMA.’

“I was honest with him and he was honest with me,” Murphy says. “Morning TV is very hard, very competitive, very high pressure. You can only do this job for a certain amount of time – it’s definitely like dog years.

“This [‘Anderson’] was out there. Nothing else at ABC was as interesting or challenging. We agreed to part amicably.” Murphy was released from the remainder of his contract.

Given that Cooper will continue his nightly show at CNN as well as his occasional pieces for CBS’s ’60 Minutes,’ the big question is this: What happens to ‘Anderson’ when Cooper is called away for big breaking news anywhere on the planet?

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CBS CEO Les Moonves Talks Candidly About the Future of Broadcast News, Katie Couric’s Contract

CBS CEO Les Moonves spoke at the University of Texas Monday, where he accepted an award and addressed students.

While there, he commented candidly on the future of broadcast journalism, and the nightly newscasts in particular.

Among other things, Moonves said that the format of the nightly evening newscasts needs to change–and it will happen sooner rather than later.

He said that he could see the evening newscasts structured more like ABC’s “Nightline,” with an in-depth look at one or two subjects, or like the Sunday morning shows, with a round-table of panelists.

Why change them? It is too expensive to support the newscasts as it stands now, and by the time 6:30 PM rolls around, potential viewers already know the days news.

“People are getting the news elsewhere,” he said. “When there were only three networks, you did have that public service component, where we were informing America. Now, there is nothing that Katie Couric is saying that everybody doesn’t know already.”

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Letterman Extortionist Joe Halderman Won’t Attend Emmys

The CBS News producer who attempted to extort late night talk show host David Letterman may have been nominated for a News and Documentary Emmy Award, but it does not appear he will be present at the ceremony.

Joe Halderman, who was released from jail on good behavior earlier this month, tells The Hollywood Reporter (via his lawyer) that he will not be attending the News & Doc Emmys September 27. He was nominated for a “48 Hours Mystery” piece about the Amanda Knox trial.

“He’s not doing any interviews and just wants to return to a quiet and productive life,” his lawyer, Gerald Shargel said.

Halderman has expressed an interest in returning to TV news production, now that he is once again a free man.

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