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Posts Tagged ‘Chris Jansing’

Carson Daly: News Anchor

Most TV watchers probably know Carson Daly as the host of NBC’s “The Voice,” or in his longtime role as host of MTV’s “Total Request Live.” This morning however Daly put on a new hat: news anchor. Daly filled in for Matt Lauer as co-anchor of “Today.”

Daly had been filling in as a guest co-host during the third hour, which skews heavily toward entertainment and lifestyle segments, but this morning was the first time that he served as a news anchor during the 7-8 AM hour.

Update: Daly had filled in on Saturday, July 20 alongside Chris Jansing, though this morning was the first time sitting in on the significantly more popular weekday edition.

WATCH:

George Zimmerman Found Not Guilty in Shooting Death of Trayvon Martin

The broadcast news divisions and cable news channels had been waiting all day for a verdict in the George Zimmerman trial. It finally came just before 10pmET, leading the broadcast networks to produce rare, live, primetime special reports for the not guilty verdict. But one network, ABC News, began their special report too late and missed the verdict. ABC joined as the jurors were being polled. The network was showing the canceled “666 Park Avenue,” and even promoted the live verdict in a crawl.

On NBC, Lester Holt anchored a special report, interrupting the final seconds of a made-for-TV movie based on the American Girl doll Saige. Holt took viewers to the verdict, seconds before it was being read. NBC’s report lasted until 10:08.

CBS was first on the air at 9:58, joining during the closing credits of “48 Hours” in the Eastern and Central time zones. The Jim Axelrod-anchored special also went off the air at 10:08.

Despite missing the verdict live, the timing for ABC could not have been better. The network already had “20/20″ on the schedule. The live special report anchored by David Muir began with the verdict then recounted the 16-month long case through the 10pm hour.

The cable news channels had been on verdict watch all day, following 15 hours of deliberation by the six female jurors. By the time the verdict came Don Lemon anchored for CNN, Harris Faulkner on Fox News, Chris Jansing anchored on MSNBC and Nancy Grace was on HLN. “It’s a stunner, Nancy!” said a breathless Jane Velez-Mitchell. “Shock and awe… It’s just…uh.”

Coverage continues on the cablers with news conferences, live chopper shots and other remote cameras on the lookout for verdict reaction.

> More: CNN’s Martin Savidgewho was in the courtroom, said the notice of a verdict came less than 10 minutes before it was read. “It was a race to get to the elevators. Probably 36 reporters and on top of that the legal teams and family members that had to get into place. We barely got into the courtroom.”

Will we hear from the jurors? Here’s what the judge said to them following the verdict:

The law gives you a unique privilege not to speak about the jury’s work. Although you are at liberty to speak with anyone about your deliberations, you are also at liberty to refuse to speak to anyone. A request to discuss either your verdict or your deliberations may come from those who are simply curious from those who might seek to find fault with you, from the media, from the attorneys or elsewhere. It will be up to you to decide whether to preserve your privacy as a juror.

Rashida Jones Named EP of MSNBC’s ‘Jansing & Co.’

Rashida Jones is joining MSNBC as the executive producer of “Jansing & Company,” Chris Jansing‘s 10amET show.

Jones comes from WIS, the NBC affiliate in Columbia, S.C., where she has been the news director since 2011. She replaces Fedrico Quadrani, who left MSNBC for CNN earlier this year.

“Rashida, a highly-sought after newsroom leader, has always been someone I wanted on our team,” MSNBC VP and executive editor Yvette Miley wrote in an email to MSNBC staffers today. “She is a visionary who understands strategy and how to lead a team to accomplish a goal.”

TVSpy has more on the hire.

President Obama To Speak at 10 AM, As More Correspondents Descend On Oklahoma

President Obama is scheduled to comment on the disaster in Oklahoma at 10 AM and it is likely that all of the broadcast networks will break into regular programming to cover it.  ”CBS This Morning” went into the 9 AM hour to cover the fallout. We hear that “CTM” will stay live until 12 PM on the east coast covering the damage, and 10 AM pacific.

Update: “Our prayers are with the people of Oklahoma today,” Obama said. “Oklahoma needs to get everything that it needs right away.”

“If there is hope to hold onto, not just in Oklahoma but around the country, it is the knowledge that the good people there in Oklahoma are more prepared than most, and what they can be certain about is that Americans around the country will be right there with them,” he added.

Meanwhile, the news channels are sending their A-teams to Oklahoma to cover the fallout from the tornado.

As we noted yesterday, NBC has Brian Williams,  Lester HoltAnn CurryHarry SmithKate SnowAnne Thompson and Dr. Nancy Snyderman in Oklahoma, as well as the Weather Channel team of Jim CantoreMike Bettes, and Mike Seidel.

ABC News has Sam ChampionGinger ZeeDavid Muir and Alex Perez in Oklahoma. Byron Pitts, Mike Boettcher, and Cecilia Vega are also either in Moore or en route.

CBS has Norah O’Donnell anchoring from Moore, and Anna Werner on the ground, and Scott Pelley will anchor the “CBS Evening News” there this evening.
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Explosions at Finish Line of the Boston Marathon

The cable news networks pivoted to breaking news in Massachusetts shortly after 3pmET Monday afternoon as two explosions went off at the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

Fox News was the first cable news network to report the news at 3:06:18 p.m., followed just seconds later by CNN at 3:06:53 p.m. MSNBC reported the news at 3:08:45 p.m. All three cable news networks were several minutes minutes behind the first reports of the explosions on Twitter.

Fox News and CNN are relying on live pictures from Boston local stations. MSNBC has video from New England Cable News, which is owned and operated by NBC Universal.

> More: The broadcast networks also broke in with news of the explosions. CBS News was first at 3:10pmET, followed by ABC News and NBC News at 3:13 p.m. Scott Pelley is anchoring on CBS, Brian Williams on NBC and Diane Sawyer and George Stephanopoulos on ABC.

> More: Matt Frucci, the incoming executive producer of CNN’s new morning show, is doing eyewitness reports from the scene for the network. Wolf Blitzer is anchoring. And on Fox News, Shepard Smith is talking with WGBH’s Emily Rooney, former network executive and daughter of Andy Rooney.

> More: Anderson Cooper is on his way to Boston and will anchor at 8pmET and 10pmET.

> More: Here’s affiliate video of one of the explosions, as seen on CNN:

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Chris Jansing and Chris Hayes Speak Out

MSNBC’s Chris Jansing is profiled by Herlife, while Chris Hayes talks to ForbesJeff Bercovici.

Jansing talks about the difficulty of covering tragedies:

When Chris was on location reporting on the horrific shootings in Newtown, Connecticut, last December, keeping a dry eye throughout the nearly weeklong broadcast was almost impossible. “You cannot interview people directly affected by such a thing and not feel the pain they are feeling. As a reporter, I have to allow that to happen so I can communicate the emotion authentically to the viewers,” Chris emphasized. “You meet family members of the victims; you meet members of the community. You cry with them. At times, it can be a challenge to find the balance of being a communicator and establishing that necessary distance.”

Hayes talks about his show’s name:
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Networks Up Early For Pope Francis’ Inaugural Mass

Pope Francis marked the start of his papacy with an inaugural mass at the Vatican this morning. The cable and broadcast networks that had special reports anchored coverage of the event, which began around 4:30amET, from New York.

CNN covered the mass during an expanded version of “Early Start,” with John Berman and Zoraida Sambolin anchoring beginning at 3:30amET. Fox News’ special report, anchored by Shepard Smith, began at 4:20amET. Chris Jansing anchored on MSNBC beginning at 4:30amET.

On the broadcast networks, ABC’s Terry Moran anchored beginning at 3:51amET. Cecilia Vega and Ron Claiborne reported from Vatican City. On NBC, Savannah Guthrie anchored beginning at 4:31amET, with Keir Simmons in Vatican City. CBS News did not air a special report, but correspondent Vinita Nair did live shots from St. Peter’s Square for the network’s affiliates during the inaugural mass. CBS also streamed the ceremony live on its website.

 

Before the Smoke Clears, The Call of a New Pope

And now the wait begins. At 12:34pmET, the doors of the Sistine Chapel closed as 115 Cardinals began the process of choosing a new pope. Now, TV news anchors, analysts, producers and bookers are at the ready for the first signs of smoke.

The news networks produced special reports as Cardinals made their way to the Sistine Chapel for the conclave with live video provided by Vatican TV. NBC’s Lester Holt and ABC’s Diane Sawyer, both in Rome, anchored special reports for their networks beginning at 11:30am. CBS’s Scott Pelley anchored a special beginning at NoonET. Now all the anchors, including Anderson Cooper and Chris Cuomo from CNN, Chris Jansing from MSNBC, and Shepard Smith from Fox News will be seated and dialed into their respective control rooms awaiting the smoke signal: black smoke for no pope, white smoke for a new pope.

Having been on the other side of this process as Jansing’s producer at the conclave that elected Benedict XVI in 2005, I can tell you the next 24-48 hours will be one of great anticipation, and, in some cases, frustration; with no warning of when the smoke will fly and when it does, finding that what appears white smoke is really black. It can be one of the most exciting and memorable moments of live TV, for its history and rarity. It’s like election night, without exit polls or precinct-by-precinct data to tell you which way the wind is blowing. And it can also be fraught with too early or wholly incorrect reporting, made more challenging this time by the wide open field of the Papabili. When the smoke clears, we will have a new pope. Before then, don’t be surprised by some misinformation from an always plugged-in global media relying on a smoke signal for news.

Papal Conclave Coverage: Broadcast and Cable Networks

The conclave to elect the next Pope will begin Tuesday after morning mass. Here’s what the broadcast and cable networks have planned for coverage.

ABC’s Diane Sawyer will broadcast “World News” from the Vatican beginning this evening. Sawyer is joined in Rome by Terry Moran, Josh Elliott, David Wright, Cokie Roberts, Rob Claiborne and Cecilia Vega. The network plans to broadcast special reports for the cardinals’ twice-daily votes.

CBS’ Scott Pelley will also be live from Vatican City starting today. Norah O’Donnell and Charlie Rose will host “CBS This Morning” live from Vatican City, with CBS News correspondents Allen Pizzey and Mark Phillips contributing to coverage.

Chris Jansing and Lester Holt will lead coverage for NBC News and MSNBC from Rome.  Anne Thompson, Keir Simmons, Claudio Lavangna and George Weigel will also contribute to NBC-MSNBC coverage. Both networks will provide special reports for the cardinals votes. Jansing and Holt also led coverage of the last papal conclave in 2005, which Jansing talks about in a lengthy Q&A with Inside Cable News.

On Fox News, Shepard Smith will anchor from Rome. He will be joined by correspondents Amy Kellogg and Lauren Green to cover the conclave. Bryan Llenas will be reporting for Fox News Latino.

Chris Cuomo and Anderson Cooper will lead CNN’s coverage from Rome. Ben Wedeman, Miguel Marquez, Dan Rivers and Becky Anderson will report, along with CNN en Español’s Adriana Hauser and Jose Levy. CNN Vatican analyst John Allen will also contribute to coverage.

Covering a Once-Every-600-Years Story

Unprecedented in modern times, the Papal departure was covered by a thoroughly modern media. From the complex (multiple live cameras and locations) to the simple (Twitter.)

As Pope Benedict XVI began his final day as the leader of the Roman Catholic church, the broadcast networks produced special reports early this morning, while the cablers went into rolling coverage for much of the morning. CBS broke in for their special report at 10:44amET as Benedict departed for the final time. ABC and NBC followed at 10:53 and FOX at 11:02am. Vatican TV provided a multi-camera, multi-vehicle production which was carried by all the networks. From the Papal residence, through the Hills of Rome to an awaiting helicopter, and the short flight to Castel Gandolfo, cameras followed, anchors commented, priests analyzed. As Norah O’Donnell explained on CBS, “19 high definition cameras carefully choreographed so that we can see this historic moment.”

On cable news, we saw the pairing of Chris Cuomo and Erin Burnett, perhaps a sign of things to come for CNN mornings. (As the Papal departure was unfolding, Jeff Zucker was introducing the new EP of the morning show, veteran producer Jim Murphy). On MSNBC, the news fell in Chris Jansing‘s hour. A veteran of Papal coverage, Jansing will return to Rome for the Conclave. Fox News had Bill Hemmer and Martha MacCallum anchoring in New York while Fr. Jonathan Morris, who has been with Fox since shortly after Benedict became Pope, gave analysis from Rome.

By 11:50am, the broadcast networks had returned to regular programming and by Noon the cable networks moved on to the other news of the day.

And as he was being driven away from the Vatican for the final time, a Tweet was sent from @pontifex, the Pope’s Twitter account:

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