TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Don Nash’

Best of Behind the TV Scenes: Nash, Xu, O’Hearn, Capus, Schreier

Throughout the summer, we’ve spotlighted the industry’s top producers; getting the inside story about their shows, how they got to where they are, and advice they have for future TV journalists.

Here are some of the best takeaways from our five-part series, “Behind the TV Scenes.”

Don Nash, “Today” EP                                                                                     Don Nash

“I never wanted to go anywhere else. I got out of college, I got a job as a page at NBC, and I never thought in a million years I’d ever work for a show as great as “Today.” I never thought in a billion years I’d ever be running the place. And I never had any desire to go anywhere else because I didn’t think it could get any better. It’s absolutely important to be loyal to whoever you work for, be it at a network or anywhere else. Loyalty is something I value in a big way; it’s something I value in the people who work for me, and it’s something I value in the people I work for.”

Susie Xu, “OutFront” EP                                                                                                                                                                                                   Susie-Xu

This one’s always tough. I think as a producer you never talk about yourself; it’s all about the anchor. What’s shaped me a lot is being the second child in a Chinese family after the one-child rule was imposed. From the beginning of my life, I was really not supposed to be born. The government came down on my parents and said, ‘you’re not supposed to have a second child, we have a one-child policy here, and you already have one daughter and you don’t need another.’ But my parents defied them, and I think that’s shaped a lot of who I am, and I always think, wow, I wasn’t even really supposed to be around and I’m so lucky to be where I am and have the awesome opportunities I have. It’s pretty cool.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Podcasting

PodcastingLearn to develop, create, and launch your own podcast! Starting October 23, Steve Belaner, the host of the weekly podcast The Gamut, will teach you how to determine the goals of your podcast, perfect your concept, contact and book guests, market your podcast, and get your show up and running in just a few weeks. Register now! 
 

‘Reclaiming the Morning Television Crown is Nothing Short of a Mania Inside NBCUniversal’

GMA TodayVariety’s Brian Steinberg takes an inside look at the behind-the-scenes battle between first-place “Good Morning America” and second-place “Today.” Although reclaiming the top spot has become “nothing short of a mania inside NBCUniversal,” Steinberg writes the two shows are not as different as the talent and executives may say:

Just as Coke and Pepsi sell a similar fizzy brown liquid, so too are “GMA” and “Today” pouring from the same pot of coffee into different mugs. “GMA” can be equally as serious as “Today” in its first hour when news warrants. For every trip that “Today’s” Guthrie makes to interview Secretary of State Kerry, there is a sojourn by “GMA’s” Robach to Nigeria to explore the plight of captive schoolgirls. For every “GMA” report on two sisters who survive being knocked off their paddleboards and drifting out to sea, there is a “Today” interview with a young man who shed 550 pounds. “GMA” recently featured a contest among local firefighting squads; after Lauer was doused in ice water on a charity dare from golfer Greg Norman, “Today” dispatched Guthrie and Lauer to Howard Stern’s XM Satellite Radio show to get the shock jock to take Lauer’s challenge.

“I know we’re doing something right,” says “Today’s” Roker, “because two or three months later, we’ll see it on ‘GMA.’ We have our ‘Orange Room,’ and oh my gosh, look at that, they’ve got a ‘Social Square!’ ” One could argue that “GMA” began showing the entire on-air team on camera well before “Today” took a similar approach. Read more

Behind the TV Scenes: ‘OutFront’ EP Susie Xu

This summer, we’re putting a spotlight on the industry’s top producers; getting the inside story about their shows, how they got to where they are, and advice they have for future TV journalists.

Susie XuIn 13 years at CNN, Susie Xu has risen from intern, to field reporter, to producer for “Larry King Live,” to her current role as executive producer of “Erin Burnett OutFront.” Xu was born in Tianjin, China, the second child in her family, born during China’s one-child policy. “From the beginning of my life, I was really not supposed to be born,” Xu tells us. “The government came down on my parents and said, ‘you’re not supposed to have a second child.’ But my parents defied them, and I think that’s shaped a lot of who I am.” Xu and her family immigrated to the U.S. when she was four. She grew up in Grove City, PA and graduated from Penn State.

TVNewser: You’ve risen up the ranks to an EP position pretty quickly. What helped you climb the ladder?

Xu: A lot of it was taking every opportunity that CNN gave me and just running with it. I don’t say this as someone who drinks the Kool-Aid of the company, but CNN has provided so many opportunities in terms of different skills that I can gain, different jobs that I can do. I started out doing show producing, running prompter, running scripts to Wolf Blitzer. Suddenly, there was an opportunity in New York and be part of the live production. I jumped on that opportunity. Within, not even two years, an opportunity opened up in the Beijing bureau to field and package produce. I had never been on the newsgathering side of things, but because I’m fluent in Chinese, and because I have that interest and that drive, my boss at the time at CNNI gave me a chance. From there, producing for Larry King just fell into my lap, and they called me when I was just coming home from Beijing, and said, “we need you to go film a special about transvestites in Miami… I knew nothing about that, but I just thought, ‘well, that’s really interesting, I’ll jump on a plane and go do it.’ A lot of it is just throwing caution to the wind and jumping in head first and figuring out as you go.

TVNewser: What was it like for you producing in the Beijing bureau?

Xu: I found it to be more difficult to acclimate than I thought, because I do know the language and have family there. I’ve been to China many times to visit family, so I thought this was going to be a piece of cake. But operating as journalist in a country that’s so restrictive will always take some getting used to. You know you’re going into a communist country; you know they’re going to censor you, but at the same time it’s always shocking what you’re being censored for. We did a story on a really crippling drought in Western China, and that to me was a weather story, and how it affected the country economically. But the local government really saw that as a threat, and got really paranoid, and followed us around to every single shoot. Every single location, there was a

Read more

Behind the TV Scenes: ‘Today’ EP Don Nash

Don Nash

This summer, we’re putting a spotlight on the industry’s top producers; getting the inside story about their shows, how they got to where they are, and advice they have for future TV journalists.

“Today” show executive producer Don Nash has been with NBC News for more than two decades, most of that time working at the signature morning show. Earlier this week we chatted with the NBC veteran

TVNewser: You’ve been with “Today” for 24 years. What’s kept you there, and how valuable a trait is loyalty to a specific network, in this day and age?

Nash: I never wanted to go anywhere else. I got out of college, I got a job as a page at NBC, and I never thought in a million years I’d ever work for a show as great as “Today.” I never thought in a billion years I’d ever be running the place. And I never had any desire to go anywhere else because I didn’t think it could get any better. It’s absolutely important to be loyal to whoever you work for, be it at a network or anywhere else. Loyalty is something I value in a big way; it’s something I value in the people who work for me, and it’s something I value in the people I work for.

TVNewser: Morning TV is a cutthroat industry. How do you balance the drive to be number one, managing talent egos, and producing a quality broadcast every day?

Read more

Jamie Horowitz Named SVP/General Manager of ‘Today’ Show

JamieHorowitzESPN executive Jamie Horowitz is joining NBC News as SVP and GM of the “Today” show. But his ESPN contract won’t allow him to take the job until later this year.

Horowitz, who will report to NBC News president Deborah Turness, will lead the four hours of “Today” on all platforms. Executive producer Don Nash, “Weekend Today” EP Dee Dee Thomas, and Jen Brown the GM of Today.com, will report to Horowitz.

At ESPN, Horowitz is Vice President of Original Programming and Production. He has overseen the launch of Keith Olbermann‘s ESPN2 show as well as “First Take,” “Numbers Never Lie,” and “SportsNation.” Before joining ESPN in 2006, Horowitz worked at NBC Sports. He began his career as an NBC Olympics Researcher for the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney.

“I am honored to join Deborah’s team and help guide ‘Today’ into the future,” said Horowitz in a news release. “This is an exciting and invigorating opportunity, and I am humbled to work with one of the most indelible brands in television. I am also grateful to John Skipper and ESPN for the opportunities and support they have given me over the past eight years.”

Horowitz is another in a line of “Today” show leaders who got their start with NBC Olympics. Former EP Jim Bell, now the EP of NBC Olympics, got his start as a producer for NBC’s coverage of the 1992 Barcelona Games. Now CNN Worldwide president, one-time “Today” show EP Jeff Zucker‘s first job at NBC was as a researcher at the Seoul Olympics in 1988.

Deadspin first reported back in January that NBC was talking with Horowitz about the job.

See Turness’ internal note to staff, after the jump…

Read more

NBC News Toasts Cheryl Gould: ‘She Came to the Newsroom With a Fresh Perspective’

NUP_163612_0024.JPGCurrent and former NBC News talent, executives and producers gathered at 30 Rock last night to celebrate Cheryl Gould, who is retiring after 37 years at the network.

Gould was toasted by Tom Brokaw, former NBC News presidents Steve Capus and Bill Wheatley, and Andrea Mitchell, who called Gould a “pioneer” and “role model” for women in journalism. Among many other roles at NBC, Gould was the first female executive producer of “Nightly News.”

“She came to the newsroom with a fresh perspective — the idea that we can constantly raise the bar, that we’ve got to be reaching for the heights in terms of our obligation to our audience on a daily basis,” Brokaw said. “…She knew what she had to do was to change the DNA of news so that it had a wider lens attached to it.”

Also in attendance: Deborah Turness, Brian Williams, Matt Lauer, Bob Hager, Alexandra Wallace, David Corvo, Patrick Burkey, Don Nash, Ken Strickland, Liz Cole and Mark Whitaker, along with Gould’s fiancé and longtime partner, attorney Reid Weingarten.

It’s Official: Tamron Hall Joins ‘Today’ as 9 a.m. Co-Host

tamron hallTamron Hall is officially joining “Today” as a co-host of the third hour. As we’ve been reporting, Hall’s new deal gives her an expanded role on “Today” while she continues to anchor her MSNBC show, which moves to 11amET today.

“We’re really excited to officially welcome Tamron into the TODAY family,” “Today” executive producer Don Nash said in a statement. “She brings wit, enthusiasm and a keen sensibility to an all-around fantastic team, and I think Tamron, Al, Natalie and Willie will have a lot of fun together hosting the third hour.”

During the announcement of her new role, which came at the end of the 8 a.m. hour on “Today,” Hall shared the story of how her mother, standing on Rockefeller plaza with Hall a year before she was hired by MSNBC said, “Next year you’re going to be working here.” The two snapped a picture on Hall’s new camera.

“So a year to the day I’m going in to be hired and I show Steve Capus, who was the president of NBC News at the time, the date [on the picture],” Hall recalled. “And we both started crying. It was a year to the day.”

>Update: NBC’s official announcement is after the jump. Read more

‘Today’ Remembers Audio Technician Killed in NYC Train Derailment

Jim Lovell, an audio technician for “Today,” was one of the four victims in Sunday’s Metro North train derailment. Lovell worked for PRG, a media services company that frequently works with NBC, and was part of “just about every big concert we ever had on our plaza,” Matt Lauer said on the show this morning.

“He was not only a skilled technician but also one of the nicest guys you ever met,” executive producer Don Nash wrote in a note to NBC staffers Sunday night. “…He always had a smile on his face and was quick to share a friendly greeting.”

Read Nash’s full note after the jump. Read more

‘Today’ Show EP: ‘We Are On Our Way Back’

SnydermanDaughterProstate exams, doomed skydivers, and milking goats: just another week at NBC’s morning show.

In an email to his staff this afternoon — obtained by TVNewser — “Today” senior EP Don Nash thanked them for helping produce “a show made up of moments.” He also pointed out the “inappropriate finger jokes” from Matt Lauer’s doctor following a segment which included prostate exams for Lauer and Al Roker.

I “end” with kudos to Matt and Al for showing America just how easy it is to get a prostrate screening. The inappropriate finger jokes from Matt’s doctor aside, this was about taking a risk, trying something new and making it work. It’s moments like these, brought by you, that set us apart from any other show on television. Things are coming together. We are on our way back. I feel it in the show, I hear it from the audience and I see it in the numbers.

“Today,” which had been No. 1 in the mornings for 16 years, fell to second place behind ABC’s “Good Morning America” last year. Nash’s note after the jump…

Read more

New ‘Today’ Set ‘A Place Where the Newsroom Meets the Living Room’

Deborah Turness has only been at the helm of NBC News for five weeks, but the new set of the “Today” show speaks to her vision for the future.

Turness called the new set, which will officially be unveiled Monday, a “physical manifestation of a very clear strategic plan we have for the ‘Today’ show going forward.” She said the strategy is a research-based approach with three guiding principles — substance, uplift and connection — that will push the show forward through “evolution, not revolution.”

The primary color on the new set is orange, which executive producer Don Nash joked was inspired by Savannah Guthrie‘s new hair color. In fact, it is designed to represent the sunrise, which “Today” says they will be incorporating into the set via viewer pictures and live feeds from local affiliates.

The revamped Studio 1A features several large high-definition monitors, one of which can be broken apart into six separate panels, to showcase the sunrises and other video. It has a large orange curved couch that can seat at least eight people comfortably, as well as a more intimate interview area for one-on-one interviews. The anchor desk — expected to be delivered and put in place on Sunday — will be on a rotating disk on the floor, like a large lazy Susan, so its backdrop can change throughout the show.

“The turntable thing is great. I’m trying to picture it on a One Direction morning when there’s 18,000 people out there,” Matt Lauer told TVNewser. “Spinning around and seeing [the plaza] is going to invigorate you.”

Read more

NEXT PAGE >>