TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook 10,000 Words GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Emily Rooney’

Explosions at Finish Line of the Boston Marathon

The cable news networks pivoted to breaking news in Massachusetts shortly after 3pmET Monday afternoon as two explosions went off at the finish line of the Boston Marathon.

Fox News was the first cable news network to report the news at 3:06:18 p.m., followed just seconds later by CNN at 3:06:53 p.m. MSNBC reported the news at 3:08:45 p.m. All three cable news networks were several minutes minutes behind the first reports of the explosions on Twitter.

Fox News and CNN are relying on live pictures from Boston local stations. MSNBC has video from New England Cable News, which is owned and operated by NBC Universal.

> More: The broadcast networks also broke in with news of the explosions. CBS News was first at 3:10pmET, followed by ABC News and NBC News at 3:13 p.m. Scott Pelley is anchoring on CBS, Brian Williams on NBC and Diane Sawyer and George Stephanopoulos on ABC.

> More: Matt Frucci, the incoming executive producer of CNN’s new morning show, is doing eyewitness reports from the scene for the network. Wolf Blitzer is anchoring. And on Fox News, Shepard Smith is talking with WGBH’s Emily Rooney, former network executive and daughter of Andy Rooney.

> More: Anderson Cooper is on his way to Boston and will anchor at 8pmET and 10pmET.

> More: Here’s affiliate video of one of the explosions, as seen on CNN:

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Get $25 OFF Podcasting

PodcastingStarting July 31, learn how to develop and create your own podcast in just a a matter of weeks! In this course you'll learn how to determine the goals of your podcast, pinpoint your concept, contact and book guests, distribute and market your podcast and more. Get $25 OFF with code CLASS25. Register now! 
 

News Corp. Scandal a ‘Scary Example of What Can Happen When We Lose Sight of Ethical Journalism’

NBC News president Steve Capus and ABC News correspondent Martha Raddatz were among the honorees at the 22nd annual First Amendment Dinner and Awards in Washington, DC last night.

Capus was presented with the First Amendment Leadership award by “NBC Nightly News” anchor Brian Williams. (Both arrived in DC after spending the afternoon at the NBC News upfront in New York.) In his speech, Capus called on news organizations to maintain public trust, implicitly referring to News Corporation’s News of the World hacking scandal:

Last fall, we witnessed a frightening example of a news organization allegedly abusing the privacy rights of citizens in order to access information on their cell phones, of all things. Regardless of how this all went down, it was truly a fall. It’s a scary example of what can happen when we lose sight of ethical journalism and the importance of trust.

Raddatz was presented the Leonard Zeidenberg First Amendment Award by her ABC colleague Jonathan Karl. Raddatz said international reporting is “something I’ve been passionate about, and I appreciate that ABC has been supportive of that passion over the years and invested in coverage.”

The RTDNF presented the Lifetime Achievement Award for Excellence to the family of the late Andy Rooney. WGBH TV’s Emily Rooney accepted the award on her father’s behalf.

Fox News Channel anchor Kelly Wright was the evening’s emcee.

> Related, TVSpy: NY Stations Carry Live Coverage of Verdict in Rutgers Webcam Spying Case

The Ticker: Rooney’s Money, Cooper’s Flat, Fearless Women…

  • Andy Rooney is leaving behind a $9 million estate to be divided between his four children, including tvnewsers Brian and Emily Rooney — $8 million in stocks, bonds and cash and $1 million in property. Brian Rooney tells the Daily News, “Some years he made more money than others. When he made it, he stashed it away. He could have had a $50 million estate if he’d paid attention to it.”
  • Anderson Cooper is selling his New York City apartment (right). Cooper bought the former manufacturing space in 2005 for $2.48 million and, after updates, is listing it for $3.75 million. The 3,100 square foot, two-floor penthouse in the Garment District also includes a landscaped deck with gas grill adding an additional 1,700 square feet.
  • CBS’s Lara Logan, NBC’s Andrea Mitchell and CNN’s Sara Sidner are among The Daily Beast’s “150 Fearless Women.” Editors cited Logan who “repeatedly put herself in the line of fire;” they say Mitchell’s resilience covering “the largely male-dominated worlds of foreign afffairs, politics and government” is to be commended; and Sidner was honored for “fearlessly reporting” scenes in recent years from India, Egypt and Libya.

A Few More Minutes with Andy Rooney

Friends and colleagues from across the TV spectrum joined Andy Rooney‘s four children this morning at Rose Hall, bidding farewell to the CBS News essayist, who died November 4 following complications from minor surgery.

Rooney’s son Brian Rooney, a longtime correspondent at ABC News, hosted the memorial service which included remarks from Andy Rooney’s three daughters, Ellen Rooney, Emily Rooney and Martha Fishel and Rooney’s girlfriend of 7 years, former “Today” show “girl” Beryl Pfizer, who had known Rooney since 1950. Rooney’s grandchildren were there, including Justin Fishel Pentagon producer for Fox News Channel.

Brian Rooney talked about how, over the past several weeks he’s gone through his father’s belongings and found everything from a $6,000 uncashed check from CBS, to a diary entry dated March 8, 1941: “Went to Gallagher’s. Don’t get chicken at a steakhouse.”

“What you saw, was the same show that we had at dinnertime,” said Rooney.

CBS News chairman and “60 Minutes” EP Jeff Fager as well as Rooney’s “60″ family: Morley Safer, Steve Kroft and Scott Pelley all spoke at the service.

Safer talked of Rooney’s “rich, eccentric legacy.” A man who filled American homes “like a piece of the Sunday furniture, like a portrait on the wall, like the TV itself.”

Safer then introduced a video which included outtakes of his interview with Rooney conducted last Spring. Showing a picture of the early correspondents: Harry Reasoner, Mike Wallace and Diane Sawyer, Rooney stopped at Sawyer — who was not able to attend. “She’s the prettiest girl I

Read more

Emily Rooney on Andy Rooney: ‘People got my dad. They knew who he was’

Veteran “60 Minutes” commentator Andy Rooney was surrounded by family when he died last night in a New York City hospital at age 92, according to one of his daughters.

“He was conscious almost until the end,” Emily Rooney, a producer and host at Boston’s WGBH, tells TVNewser. “He knew we were there. He let us know that.”

Mr. Rooney died from complications following minor surgery on Oct. 18, Emily said. Though declining to offer details, she said her father had undergone the procedure before.

“It was not a big deal, but it ended up being a big thing,” she said. “It was a total surprise to us that things didn’t work out.”

Also surprising was the extent of TV coverage today of her father’s passing, she said. “I flipped on the news this morning and it was everywhere. There was an odd, satisfying solace in that.

“People got my dad. They knew who he was. He wasn’t some crank who went on “60 Minutes” once a week. He was ‘every man.’”

A noted World War II correspondent, Mr. Rooney joined CBS in 1949 as a writer for “Arthur Godfrey’s Talent Scouts.” His “60″ commentaries, A Few Minutes with Andy Rooney, ran from 1978 until his final regular appearance, on October 2. It was his 1,097th commentary.

The family will hold a private funeral service this week, with a CBS memorial at a later date, Emily said. Mr. Rooney will be buried in the family plot in Rensselaerville, N.Y., near his native Albany. Marguerite ‘Margie’ Rooney, his wife of 62 years, is also buried there.

The family has requested that all donations be sent to the Andrew A. Rooney Scholarship Fund at Colgate University, his 1942 alma mater. The address: 13 Oak Drive, Hamilton, N.Y. 13346.

Andy Rooney Dies at 92

Legendary CBS News commentator Andy Rooney, whose weekly “A Few Minutes with Andy Rooney” commentaries on “60 Minutes” made him a welcome guest in millions of people’s homes across the country, died last night in the hospital in New York City of complications following minor surgery.

Born January 14, 1919 in Albany New York, Rooney began his journalism career in the U.S. Army, where he wrote for the Stars & Stripes newspaper during World War II. He would join CBS in 1949 as a writer for a number of entertainment programs, including “Arthur Godfrey’s Talent Scouts.” He wrote his first essay–a precursor to the sorts of essays he would write for “60 Minutes”–in 1964.

Rooney partnered with CBS correspondent Harry Reasoner to write and produce a number of commentaries from 1964-1968, and served as a producer on the first few seasons of “60 Minutes.” His “A Few Minutes with Andy Rooney” segment became a regular feature  in 1978, and it remained a staple of the program until ending it in September.

Rooney has written a regular newspaper column for Tribune starting in 1979, and has also written 16 books. He received a lifetime achievement Emmy Ward from the National Academy of Television Arts & Sciences in 2003.

In his final regular “60 Minutes” appearance, Rooney reflected on his career, and as he so often did in his commentaries, he explained his thoughts in a straightforward, concise manner.

“I’ve done a lot of complaining here, but of all the things I’ve complained about, I can’t complain about my life,” Rooney said.

He is survived by his four children, as well as his five grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. His children include ABC News correspondent Brian Rooney and WGBH and former “ABC World News” EP Emily Rooney, and one of his grandchildren, Justin Fishel, is the Pentagon producer for Fox News Channel.

Andy Rooney Returns to ’60 Minutes’ Next Week

If you watched the season premiere of “60 Minutes” last night you may have noticed the absence of Andy Rooney. Rooney, 92, has slowed down a bit since the Spring.

Rooney joined CBS News in 1949 and has been giving end-of-show commentary on “60 Minutes” since 1978. CBS tells us he has a segment on next Sunday’s “60 Minutes.”

Journalism is all in the family for the Rooneys. Son Brian Rooney continues as a freelance correspondent for ABC News, daughter Emily Rooney hosts shows on WGBH TV and radio in Boston and grandson Justin Fishel is the Pentagon producer for Fox News.

A TV News Family Affair: The Rooneys Stick Together in Good Times, and Bad

Rooneys.jpg

Brian Rooney, his father Andy Rooney and sister Emily Rooney in a LIFE magazine story from the Spring of 1993.

When you mess with one Rooney, you mess with them all.

Ergo, when veteran correspondent Brian Rooney becomes a victim of ABC News’ slash-and-burn cuts, the whole family fumes.

“Maybe ABC is in bigger trouble than we know,” says his father, “60 Minutes” commentator Andy Rooney, 91. “It seems unfair. They should have more concern for their own employees, and find a way to keep the ones who have been there a long while.”

Brian Rooney, 58, an L.A.-based staffer for 22 years, was told last month that his contract, which expires April 30, would not be renewed.

Sister Emily Rooney, dumped by ABC in 1994 after a hiccup as executive producer of Peter Jennings‘ “World News Tonight”, says her kid brother was shafted.

“He’s been a loyal foot soldier, not one of the stars,” opines Rooney, 60, a producer at Boston’s WGBH. “He’s gone into war zones, covered wildfires, flown around the country in rickety airplanes. He’s put himself in harm’s way.

“For him to be given the brush-off like that is stunning.”

For his part, Brian Rooney is trying to choose his words carefully. The Rooneys “are kind of a hard bunch” when it comes to overt displays of emotion, he says, but this time is an exception to the rule.

Read more

Candy Crowley: ‘I’m Not Going to Argue that When You Turn on the TV, You Basically Get Young, Blonde, Thin Women’

Crowley_2.3.jpgThe double standard is alive and well in the news business.

Or is it?

Candy Crowley‘s appointment as anchor of CNN’s “State of the Union” – she debuts Sunday — has re-ignited that contentious debate. Particularly among women.

To wit: Would Crowley have been chosen if she hadn’t dropped major poundage over the past year, or is the fact that she was chosen a sign that networks have moved beyond judging on-air women by their dress size?

Crowley, 61, whose credentials and experience are beyond reproach, says she’s not sure.

“Would I have gotten the job without having lost the weight? I don’t know. That’s an X factor,” says CNN’s respected senior political correspondent. “Does the refrigerator light stay on when you close the door? We’ll never know.”

Crowley won’t disclose how many pounds she’s lost, but says she’s down five dress sizes. She doesn’t own a scale. Exercise, diet and transcendental meditation led to the transformation, she says, which she embarked on to feel better, not to be an anchor.

“I think I have the credentials to do this job,” says Crowley, a CNN staffer since 1987. “This company has talked about my credentials first, last and always. I got the job because I’m the best person for the job.”

Still, Crowley acknowledges that she doesn’t fit the stereotype in a business where body size still matters if you’re female.

Read more

Is ‘Good Morning America’ a Stopover for Stephanopoulos?

GSteph_12.11.jpgWhile many wonder how brainiac George Stephanopoulos will adjust to the bathetic world of morning television, it may be a moot point.

Judging by ABC’s recent history, “Good Morning America” anchors are next in line for the “World News” throne.

The newest, Diane Sawyer, leaves “GMA” after today’s show to anchor “World News” beginning Dec. 21, the day before her 64th birthday. She replaces her former “GMA” co-anchor, Charlie Gibson, 66, whose “World News” finale is Dec. 18.

Tom Brokaw and Katie Couric followed the same route – both left NBC’s “Today” to anchor “NBC Nightly News” and “CBS Evening News,” respectively.

For Stephanopoulos, however, it’s sort of a reverse commute. He’s going from host of “This Week” in Washington – a job he was born to do in a town that breathes politics – to New York’s “GMA,” where politicians share the stage with reality show rejects.

“‘This Week’ plays to all of George’s strengths,” says Bob Thompson, director of Syracuse University’s Center for the Study of Popular Television. “He’s an intellectual, an egghead. Perfect for Sunday. All his credentials point to it.

“I can’t see him showing up on Halloween dressed like Peter Pan.”

Regardless, Thompson adds, “GMA” is “the price he has to pay to be the face of ABC News in the future. It’s the quickest way.”

How quick? At 48, Stephanopoulos is almost 16 years Sawyer’s junior. But with her genes, drive and political savvy, there’s no telling how long she’ll hold the chair.

Read more

NEXT PAGE >>