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Posts Tagged ‘Jim Tressel’

FIFA: 1 Billion People Saw Part Of World Cup Final

FIFA announced Monday that the 2010 World Cup final was seen by at least 1 billion people.

FIFA research shows that 909.6 million television viewers watched at least one minute of the match between Spain and the Netherlands.

When you factor in fans who watched online and in public viewing places, that figure is more than 1 billion.

The 2008 Beijing Olympics opening ceremony retains its spot as the most-watched televised event in the world with 984 million people tuning in for at least part of the four-hour ceremony.

The 2010 FIFA World Cup was show in every single country and territory on Earth. Coverage of the competition reached over 3.2 billion people around the world (46.4 percent of the global population), based on viewers watching a minimum of over one minute of coverage. Those numbers are up eight percent compared to the 2006 FIFA World Cup. Read more

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Dick Enberg Working His Final Wimbledon

Legendary announcer Dick Enberg will call his 32nd and final Wimbledon tournament starting Monday.

“It’s part of 5 decades, starting in 1979, a total of 32 Wimbledons,” Enberg told the San Diego Union-Tribune via email from England. “The decision was mine to make this my last Wimbledon and ESPN was sensitive to give me a chance to say goodbye to an event that has been my favorite.”

Enberg will do 10 “vignettes” to reflect on his 30-plus years calling action from Wimbledon. He will return to his play-by-play duties with the San Diego Padres on July 6.

[H/T Fang's Bites]

 

Video: Jim Tressel's Wife Slams Door On TV Reporter

WSYX-TV reporter Steve Levine had the assignment of getting reaction from Jim Tressel‘s family following his resignation from Ohio State University.

Jim’s wife, Ellen, wasn’t in a talkative mood and slammed the door in Levine’s face.

Good call.

[H/T SportsByBrooks]

 

Rangers Re-Assign Play-By-Play Announcer Rhadigan

The Texas Rangers have removed John Rhadigan as play-by-play announcer after only 50 games on the job and replaced him with Dave Barnett. Rhadigan, who replaced Josh Lewin before this season, had no previous play-by-experience and will return to his prior role as host of the Rangers’ pre- and post-game shows.

“There’s tremendous comfort in that,” Rhadigan told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram. “I got to do three months of fantasy baseball, and it was a dream come true.”

Joey Matschulatof Baseball Time in Arlington said,

(T)he anger felt on this issue was best directed towards the Rangers for putting Rhadigan in a position to fail, and towards the media types that so vigorously defended Rhadigan even though they didn’t necessarily watch the games on television and, therefore, were not in a position to judge his work or the feedback of others.

NBA Finals Gives American Airlines Millions in Free Advertising

Beyond playing together in the NBA Finals, the Dallas Mavericks and the Miami Heat share something else in common: a home stadium sponsored by American Airlines. The Mavericks play at American Airlines Center, while the Heat play at American Airlines Arena. As Yahoo! Sports outlines in this video piece below, American Airlines is projected to get $10.5 million worth of free advertising for every Dallas home game and a bit more for every Miami home game, thanks to media mentions of the two team venues.

New Jersey Nets Owner Can Backflip a Jetski

The New York Times Magazine publishes a long feature with New Jersey Nets owner Mikhail Prokhorov. It checks in at 8,500 words, most of them awesome.

Chip Brown‘s piece details how the enormous Russian made his billions (in sketchy ways), how he hopes to transform the Nets, and his enjoyment of water sports.

As he leaned back in his chair and closed his eyes a moment – it had been a long day, a hectic summer – I remembered a time in July, when we traipsed down to the Moscow River to a boathouse in the flood plain where he kept a naval strike force of Rickter skis. He squirmed into a padded wet suit and then jumped into the tea-colored water, a side channel off the main flow. The water was warm; God knows what was in it. He was up and away in no time on the Rickter ski, hulking over the tippy hull like an adolescent on a toddler’s bike. You could see the grasshopper in the Lada. At the touch of the throttle, the engine screamed like a furious chain saw, and he came ripping past the dock where a bunch of his friends were standing and then banked sharply, fanning up a tail of spray that sent them all dashing for cover. Out on the open water again, he gunned the craft in a hard circle, then cut back across the wave he’d raised, and the ski shot into the air, climbing the late gold light of a Moscow summer evening until Prokhorov was upside down with the 300-pound machine arcing over his head. He pulled it around full circle, thumping back into the water with a billowy thud. Again and again, he roiled the river and flung the Rickter ski off the waves through back flips and barrel rolls.