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Posts Tagged ‘John Harwood’

Ratings Notes: FBN Tops Day One Of RNC

The cable business channels had some RNC coverage as well last night. CNBC went with limited coverage, only going live from 10-11PM with Larry Kudlow and John Harwood anchoring. Fox Business was a bit more intensive, going live from 8-11:15 with Neil Cavuto anchoring. Bloomberg TV also had live coverage from 9-11, but is not rated by Nielsen.

Bear in mind that both of these networks were competing against their politics-centric corporate siblings, so the ratings expectations were not set too high.

From 10-11PM–the only hour FBN and CNBC were head to head–FBN averaged 388,000 viewers, including 161,000 adults 25-54. CNBC averaged 163,000 viewers, including 76,000 A25-54.

From 8-9, FBN averaged  246,000 total viewers, and 93,000 A25-54. From 9-10, it drew 307,000 total viewers and 111,000 A25-54.

Despite Requests, TV Reporters Still Prevalent In Political Attack Ads

Despite requests from TV news organizations to political campaigns, attack ads across the country still prominently feature TV news anchors and reporters. Advertising Age looked at the numbers, and found that journalists have been featured in TV spots that aired thousands and thousands of times.

Clips from CNBC were the most commonly used, followed by CNN and MSNBC. Tom Brokaw, David Gregory, Ali Velshi and John Harwood were among the journalists whose clips were used for political purposes. Earlier this year networks asked the campaigns to stop featuring clips from their programming in ads. It didn’t work.

Ad Age explains:

From a messaging standpoint, TV journalists “deliver” the advertisers’ messages not only more credibly but also more concisely and accessibly, an added benefit for the advertisers in light of the complex economic circumstances being debated this year. Deficit spending, unemployment and stimulus are tough to explain in 30 seconds, so why not “borrow” the people who do it for a living? Having familiar faces and voices do the work is also far more powerful than showing frame after frame of static newspaper headlines.


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What the Camera Doesn’t Show During Some Summer Liveshots

John Harwood isn’t letting his vacation get in the way of his reporting for CNBC. This morning on Squawk Box, Harwood was live from Delaware. Joe Kernen asked him why Delaware.

“I’m in Delaware, Joe, because the ocean is in Delaware. This is Bethany Beach and you know, when a presidential candidate picks his vice president while you’re on vacation, you’ve got to adapt and adjust, which is why I’m wearing shorts and flip-flops below camera level right now.”

“Oh, oh, oh. We don’t need to see that. We do not need to see that,” said Kernen.

So we’ll show you instead.

CNBC’s John Harwood on Appearing in (Another) Political Ad

As “Face the Nation” host Bob Schieffer discovered on Sunday, more short snippets from news anchors are showing up in political ads this election cycle. CNBC chief Washington correspondent John Harwood, who is featured in a recent ad attacking President Obama’s economic record, examines the trend in the New York Times:

A campaign like this one, centered around economic conditions, only increases the incentives to use TV talking heads as shortcuts. Personal scandals are easier to exploit in 30 seconds than fiscal policy and international debt crises.

“Illustrating the problems facing the American economy is very difficult to do,” said Elizabeth Wilner, a former political director at NBC News who is now a vice president at Kantar and a columnist for Advertising Age. Using TV journalists “provides compelling, credible footage to back up the ads’ arguments.”

Interestingly, this is not Harwood’s first time appearing in a political ad. In 1968, he was volunteered by his mother to appear in a campaign ad for Robert F. Kennedy, an experience he recounted for TVNewser in 2009. At the time, his father Richard Harwood was covering Kennedy’s campaign for The Washington Post. Watch the ad:

Networks Slate Special Coverage of Super Tuesday

Voters in 10 states head to the polls tomorrow to weigh in on the next GOP Presidential candidate. Here’s the plan for Super Tuesday coverage on the broadcast and cable news and business networks.

The broadcast networks:

  • “Nightly News” anchor Brian Williams will helm a one-hour special on NBC News from 10-11pmET. Williams will also present live updates on the voting results between 7-10pmET as news dictates. “Nightly” will be updated for later feeds throughout the evening.
  • Diane Sawyer and George Stephanopoulous will anchor special reports on ABC beginning at 7pmET. “World News” will also be updated for later feeds. At 11:35pmET, Terry Moran will anchor a special edition of “Nightline.”
  • On CBS, Scott Pelley will provide live primetime updates throughout the night.
  • Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff will anchor a live “PBS Newshour” at 11pmET.
  • On FOX, Shepard Smith will anchor live updates from 8-11pmET.

The cable networks:

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Broadcast, Cable Networks Plan State of the Union Coverage

All four major broadcast networks, along with the cable news channels and the business networks, are planning special coverage for President Obama’s third State of the Union address.

The broadcast networks will kick off special coverage beginning at 9pmET — anchored by Scott Pelley on CBS, Brian Williams on NBC and Diane Sawyer and George Stephanopoulos on ABC. Fox News anchor Shepard Smith will anchor coverage for the Fox Broadcast Network.

On the cable networks:

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NBC Apologizes to Michele Bachmann over Jimmy Fallon Flap

NBC apologized to GOP presidential candidate Michele Bachmann Wednesday over the musical introduction during her appearance on “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” Monday night. The show’s drummer Questlove had played the song “Lyin’ Ass Bitch.” Fallon apologized via Twitter on Tuesday but yesterday on Fox News, Bachmann demanded an apology from the network. And she got it. Via CNN:

Bachmann received a letter Wednesday from Doug Vaughan, NBC’s senior vice president for special programs and late night, that apologized for what happened, said Alice Stewart, the Republican presidential hopeful’s spokeswoman.

The issue was also a topic this morning on the “Today” show, with a story from Kristen Welker and this Q&A with John Harwood:

Cheers and Jeers from GOP Candidates Over Debate Questions

At least one GOP candidate decided to blame the media — and academia — for many of the ills in the nation today. And he took it out on CNBC’s Maria Bartiromo, one of the moderators of the debate in Rochester, MI.

In a discussion about Occupy Wall St., Gingrich concluded with, “It’s sad that the news media doesn’t report accurately how the economy works.”

“What exactly… Mr. Speaker. I’m sorry, but what is the media reporting inaccurately about the economy?” asked Bartiromo. “What?” said Gingrich. Bartiromo repeated and Gingrich shot back: “I love humor disguised as a question, that’s terrific,” said Gingrich dismissively.

While Mr. Herman Cain stayed on his 9-9-9 message, 20 minutes into the debate Bartiromo went there with the candidate asking — to boos — about “character issues” and whether the American people should hire him. Co-moderator John Harwood followed up with Mitt Romney — and more boos — asking if he’d keep Cain on as CEO if Romney’s Bain Capital had bought Cain’s company. “Look, look. Herman Cain is the person to respond to these questions. He just did. The American people in this room and across the country can make their own assessment on that.”

Harwood moved on: “Governor Huntsman let me move back to the economy.” The crowd liked that line. (Clip after the jump).

After the debate, which went about 20 minutes longer than scheduled, Bartiromo Tweeted, “We tried to stick to economic issues. And I think there were many winners. I am not upset the crowd booed over cain q. We had to ask once.”

Candidate Rep. Michele Bachmann praised Bartiromo and Harwood in a post-debate interview: “I want to give credit to CNBC. I think you as moderators set a tone because you weren’t baiting one candidate to go after another. A lot of times, if you notice previous debates, that will happen.”

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Stage is Set for CNBC GOP Debate

Debate preps are in high gear in Rochester, Michigan for tonight’s “Your Money, Your Vote: The Republican Presidential Debate” live on CNBC. Maria Bartiromo and John Harwood moderate the debate at Oakland University starting at 8pmET. The economy is supposed to be the focus of the 90-minute debate, but allegations against GOP candidate Herman Cain will loom large.

(Photo: CNBC/Sanford Cannold)

Bill Daley Talks to CNBC About Ed Henry Exchange

CNBC’s John Harwood sat down with White House chief of staff Bill Daley yesterday for an exclusive interview in Washington, DC. Among the topics of the interview: Occupy Wall Street, the economic recovery and President Obama’s Thursday exchange with Fox News Channel’s Ed Henry.

Daley did not back away from Obama’s comments that Henry was “the spokesman for Mitt Romney,” telling Harwood, “There are certain people in the media who do seem, at times, to carry the water for certain pieces of the political spectrum.” Watch, beginning at the 1:20 mark, below:

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