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Posts Tagged ‘Lara Logan’

The Evening Ticker: Oliver, Delgado, Davies

  • John Oliver is leaving “The Daily Show” for HBO where he will host his own weekly program. The Sunday evening show will be a topical comedy series debuting in 2014.

  • Jennifer Delgado is joining The Weather Channel as a meteorologist based out of Atlanta. Delgado comes from CNN International and CNN domestic.

CBS News Conducting ‘Journalistic Review’ Into ’60 Minutes’ Benghazi Story

LoganApologyCBS News is conducting an “ongoing journalistic review” into that “60 Minutes” report on the attack on the U.S. mission in Benghazi last year. Correspondent Lara Logan has apologized, twice, on air for being “misled” by former security contractor Dylan Davies.

The AP’s David Bauder reports:

The network would not say Wednesday who is conducting its review, whether anyone outside the network was involved, or whether the results would be made public. CBS has given no indication that Logan or anyone else involved in reporting or vetting the story will face disciplinary action.

“It’s far from over,” a source tells TVNewser. Bauder asks several questions that are “ripe for discussion.”

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Dan Rather: CBS ‘Trying To Airbrush Me Out Of Their History’

Rather1963Dan Rather to CBS: Get over it.

Despite the scorched earth he left behind, Rather insists he’s baffled as to why his alma mater of 44 years did not invite him to participate in its 50th anniversary coverage of the Kennedy assassination.

“Was I surprised? Let the record show I paused,” says Rather, 82, who as a young CBS reporter covering JFK’s visit to Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963, broke the news that the President was dead. “Yes, I was surprised.”

“I am an optimist…. In my optimism, I thought that maybe, just maybe, what was developing as I left CBS would fade and be past. Looking back on it, they were trying to airbrush me out of their history, like the Kremlin. I didn’t understand it while it was happening…

“I had hoped that whatever animus was there, as time goes by, would fade, and maybe they would change their minds. What’s next – I’m airbrushed out of Watergate coverage? Vietnam? Tiananmen Square? 9/11? Where does this lead?”

In fact, archival footage of Rather will be included in CBS’s special on Saturday, as will some of his previously-aired reminiscences. He will anchor his own retrospective Monday on AXS-TV, where he hosts ‘Dan Rather Reports.’ Also, he’ll appear with NBC’s Tom Brokaw on ‘Today’ Nov. 22.

CBS and Rather are not exactly on speaking terms. Since Memogate in 2004, he’s been a virtual persona non grata. Forced out as anchor after 24 years, he bitterly left the network in 2006 and later filed a $70 million suit. It was dismissed in 2009 by New York State’s highest court.

Though the suit cost him millions of dollars personally, he has no regrets. “It was about trying to save a body of work,” he says. “…There was no line at CBS running from Murrow to Cronkite to Rather. Rather, in effect, never existed…. Anybody in my position would have done what they could to preserve 44 years of work.”

Rather refuses to comment on the ongoing scandal at CBS’s “60 Minutes” involving Lara Logan’s report on Benghazi. She apologized on the air Sunday for having been “misled” by a security contractor who told inconsistent stories about being an eyewitness to the attack.

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Lara Logan: ‘The Truth is, We Made a Mistake’

LoganApologyCBS News correspondent Lara Logan ended tonight’s “60 Minutes” with an apology for her report three weeks ago on the attacks on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi. As we’ve been reporting, Logan’s primary source for her report was a former U.S. contractor named Dylan Davies, who wrote a book about that night. But the account in his book — the basis of Logan’s story — differs from an FBI incident report.

“It was a mistake to include him in our report,” Logan said. “And for that we are very sorry.” Logan ended the broadcast with this: ”The most important thing to every person at ’60 minutes’ is the truth, and the truth is, we made a mistake.”

Last Sunday, even as criticism about the report mounted, “60 Minutes” was still taking pride in the report. Scott Pelley read these comments from viewers: “It’s about time! Your network has been a bit tepid in your reporting of the Libya terror attacks, but tonight’s report was amazing.” And: “Why no comments from former Secretary of State Clinton? Sounds like you have more work to do to get to the truth.”

Late Friday, CBS-owned Simon & Schuster pulled Davies’ book from publication.

’60 Minutes’ Will Apologize, Correct Benghazi Report

cbs logoCBS News has suffered another black eye, this time over Lara Logan‘s “60 Minutes” report on Benghazi last month.

As the Baltimore Sun’s David Zurawik puts it, “This is not as bad as Dan Rather‘s unconfirmed report about the the military service of George W. Bush that came to be known as Memogate. But it’s bad, because ’60 Minutes,’ the most successful show in the history of TV, is the program that makes all the other failures at CBS News acceptable.”

On “CBS This Morning,” Logan apologized for her report, saying “we were misled and we were wrong.” She discussed how seriously the program takes the vetting of sources for stories.

Her boss, CBS News Chairman Jeff Fager  — who doubles as Executive Producer of “60 Minutes” — has spoken with pride of the news division’s accuracy.

“We weren’t always first, but we were accurate and comprehensive,” Fager said in June 2012 , praising his network’s coverage of the movie theater shooting in Aurora, Colorado and the Supreme Court decision on President Obama’s healthcare law in the face of competitors at CNN, Fox News, and ABC who bungled those stories.

On the show he runs, “60 Minutes,” Fager was more emphatic: “How intense the process is at ’60 Minutes,’ how much we care about every line, about every interview, about not taking people out of context.”

“60 Minutes” will apologize to viewers and will correct the record Sunday night.

Lara Logan on ’60 Minutes’ Benghazi Report: ‘We Were Misled and We Were Wrong’

After last night’s admission from “60 Minutes” that new information had come to light about Lara Logan‘s Benghazi report, Logan went on “CBS This Morning” today to apologize. She told Norah O’Donnell and Jeff Glor that the show will issue a correction on Sunday’s show.

“We take the vetting of sources and stories very seriously at ‘60 Minutes’ and we took it seriously in this case. But we were misled and we were wrong, and that’s the important thing,” Logan said. “We have to set the record straight and take responsibility.” Watch:

Lara Logan Defends ’60 Minutes’ Benghazi Report; Admits CBS Tie Should Have Been Revealed

Logan_7.8CBS News correspondent Lara Logan is defending her reporting on the 9/11/12 attacks at the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi amid a firestorm of criticism over the conflicting stories of the main subject of the Oct. 27 “60 Minutes” report.

Logan interviewed Dylan Davies — who used the pseudonym Morgan Jones as the author of new book on the subject, and in his interview with CBS. What Davies writes in the book is not consistent with an incident report attributed to Davies. But Davies told the Daily Beast he didn’t write that report

“If you read the book, you would know he never had two stories. He only had one story,” Logan tells the NYTimesBill Carter. She says the criticism is political. “We worked on this for a year,” she tells Carter. “We killed ourselves not to allow politics into this report.”

One regret about the report: Logan and her boss CBS News chairman and “60 Minutes” EP Jeff Fager say they should have revealed that Davies’ book, “The Embassy House” was published by Threshold Editions, part of the Simon and Schuster unit of CBS Corp.

“Honestly, it never factored into the story. It was a mistake; we should have done it, precisely because there’s nothing to hide. It was an oversight.”

A Call for ’60 Minutes’ to Retract Report on Benghazi Attack

Davies60BenghaziCNN’s “Reliable Sources” discussed the credibility of last Sunday’s “60 Minutes” report about the 9/11/12 attacks in Benghazi. (Clip below.) Lara Logan‘s report relied on the eyewitness account of Dylan Davies, a British security contractor at the time, who went by the name Morgan Jones for the CBS report, and as the author of a book on the subject.

An official incident report differs from the version of events Davies’ writes about in his book, and conveyed to Logan. It also differs from the accounts that Davies gave to the FBI and various other U.S. agencies. Last night, Davies told the Daily Beast he’s being smeared, perhaps by the U.S. State Department.

“60 Minutes,” caught between Davies’ account and what the government says really happened, has not responded. Media Matters has already called on CBS News to retract the report.

Rep. Lindsay Graham (R-SC), who has called for new hearings on Benghazi based on the inconsistent stories, told “Fox News Sunday’s” Chris Wallace, “I don’t want to hear from any more British people about Benghazi. I want to hear from Americans who were there. If he’s lying, I want to know that. But give to me the full information he provided to our government.”

’60 Minutes’ Has Most-Watched Show Since December

AsteroidsCBSThanks to a thrilling, high scoring, last second NFL game as its lead-in, “60 Minutes” had its best showing since last December. The Broncos/Cowboys game propelled “60 Minutes” to the No. 1 show Sunday night and the No. 3 primetime show of the week. The broadcast drew 18 million viewers and delivered its best rating in the key demos since Dec. 16, 2012.

Sunday’s broadcast featured Steve Kroft’s report on the federal disability insurance program, Lara Logan’s story on the battle that inspired the film, “Black Hawk Down,” and an Anderson Cooper segment on potentially dangerous near-Earth objects such as comets and asteroids.

NBC News Takes a Rare Look Inside Secret CIA Museum, Though CBS Beat Them To It

On “NBC Nightly News” last night, correspondent Richard Engel presented a piece from inside one of the most secretive museums in the world, the CIA Museum located in the agency’s headquarters in Virginia.

“Closed to the public, it had only been visited by employees and invited guests until NBC News recently became the first news organization allowed to bring in video cameras,” Engel wrote in a post previewing the piece.

While it was a fascinating segment, and showed amazing artifacts like Osama Bin laden’s AK-47 and a mock-up of his Abbotabad compound, it was not, as a point of order, the first time a news organization went in with cameras (though it was the first time it aired on TV). In 2009 CBS’ “60 Minutes” and correspondent Lara Logan visited the museum, though the footage only made it to the program’s website, and not on-air.

In fairness to NBC, it was not promoted as being the first time a news organization visited on-air during “Nightly.”

You can check out the rpeorts from both Engel and Logan, after the jump.
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