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Posts Tagged ‘Lara Logan’

Lara Logan: ‘The Truth is, We Made a Mistake’

LoganApologyCBS News correspondent Lara Logan ended tonight’s “60 Minutes” with an apology for her report three weeks ago on the attacks on the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi. As we’ve been reporting, Logan’s primary source for her report was a former U.S. contractor named Dylan Davies, who wrote a book about that night. But the account in his book — the basis of Logan’s story — differs from an FBI incident report.

“It was a mistake to include him in our report,” Logan said. “And for that we are very sorry.” Logan ended the broadcast with this: ”The most important thing to every person at ’60 minutes’ is the truth, and the truth is, we made a mistake.”

Last Sunday, even as criticism about the report mounted, “60 Minutes” was still taking pride in the report. Scott Pelley read these comments from viewers: “It’s about time! Your network has been a bit tepid in your reporting of the Libya terror attacks, but tonight’s report was amazing.” And: “Why no comments from former Secretary of State Clinton? Sounds like you have more work to do to get to the truth.”

Late Friday, CBS-owned Simon & Schuster pulled Davies’ book from publication.

’60 Minutes’ Will Apologize, Correct Benghazi Report

cbs logoCBS News has suffered another black eye, this time over Lara Logan‘s “60 Minutes” report on Benghazi last month.

As the Baltimore Sun’s David Zurawik puts it, “This is not as bad as Dan Rather‘s unconfirmed report about the the military service of George W. Bush that came to be known as Memogate. But it’s bad, because ’60 Minutes,’ the most successful show in the history of TV, is the program that makes all the other failures at CBS News acceptable.”

On “CBS This Morning,” Logan apologized for her report, saying “we were misled and we were wrong.” She discussed how seriously the program takes the vetting of sources for stories.

Her boss, CBS News Chairman Jeff Fager  — who doubles as Executive Producer of “60 Minutes” — has spoken with pride of the news division’s accuracy.

“We weren’t always first, but we were accurate and comprehensive,” Fager said in June 2012 , praising his network’s coverage of the movie theater shooting in Aurora, Colorado and the Supreme Court decision on President Obama’s healthcare law in the face of competitors at CNN, Fox News, and ABC who bungled those stories.

On the show he runs, “60 Minutes,” Fager was more emphatic: “How intense the process is at ’60 Minutes,’ how much we care about every line, about every interview, about not taking people out of context.”

“60 Minutes” will apologize to viewers and will correct the record Sunday night.

Lara Logan on ’60 Minutes’ Benghazi Report: ‘We Were Misled and We Were Wrong’

After last night’s admission from “60 Minutes” that new information had come to light about Lara Logan‘s Benghazi report, Logan went on “CBS This Morning” today to apologize. She told Norah O’Donnell and Jeff Glor that the show will issue a correction on Sunday’s show.

“We take the vetting of sources and stories very seriously at ‘60 Minutes’ and we took it seriously in this case. But we were misled and we were wrong, and that’s the important thing,” Logan said. “We have to set the record straight and take responsibility.” Watch:

Lara Logan Defends ’60 Minutes’ Benghazi Report; Admits CBS Tie Should Have Been Revealed

Logan_7.8CBS News correspondent Lara Logan is defending her reporting on the 9/11/12 attacks at the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi amid a firestorm of criticism over the conflicting stories of the main subject of the Oct. 27 “60 Minutes” report.

Logan interviewed Dylan Davies — who used the pseudonym Morgan Jones as the author of new book on the subject, and in his interview with CBS. What Davies writes in the book is not consistent with an incident report attributed to Davies. But Davies told the Daily Beast he didn’t write that report

“If you read the book, you would know he never had two stories. He only had one story,” Logan tells the NYTimesBill Carter. She says the criticism is political. “We worked on this for a year,” she tells Carter. “We killed ourselves not to allow politics into this report.”

One regret about the report: Logan and her boss CBS News chairman and “60 Minutes” EP Jeff Fager say they should have revealed that Davies’ book, “The Embassy House” was published by Threshold Editions, part of the Simon and Schuster unit of CBS Corp.

“Honestly, it never factored into the story. It was a mistake; we should have done it, precisely because there’s nothing to hide. It was an oversight.”

A Call for ’60 Minutes’ to Retract Report on Benghazi Attack

Davies60BenghaziCNN’s “Reliable Sources” discussed the credibility of last Sunday’s “60 Minutes” report about the 9/11/12 attacks in Benghazi. (Clip below.) Lara Logan‘s report relied on the eyewitness account of Dylan Davies, a British security contractor at the time, who went by the name Morgan Jones for the CBS report, and as the author of a book on the subject.

An official incident report differs from the version of events Davies’ writes about in his book, and conveyed to Logan. It also differs from the accounts that Davies gave to the FBI and various other U.S. agencies. Last night, Davies told the Daily Beast he’s being smeared, perhaps by the U.S. State Department.

“60 Minutes,” caught between Davies’ account and what the government says really happened, has not responded. Media Matters has already called on CBS News to retract the report.

Rep. Lindsay Graham (R-SC), who has called for new hearings on Benghazi based on the inconsistent stories, told “Fox News Sunday’s” Chris Wallace, “I don’t want to hear from any more British people about Benghazi. I want to hear from Americans who were there. If he’s lying, I want to know that. But give to me the full information he provided to our government.”

’60 Minutes’ Has Most-Watched Show Since December

AsteroidsCBSThanks to a thrilling, high scoring, last second NFL game as its lead-in, “60 Minutes” had its best showing since last December. The Broncos/Cowboys game propelled “60 Minutes” to the No. 1 show Sunday night and the No. 3 primetime show of the week. The broadcast drew 18 million viewers and delivered its best rating in the key demos since Dec. 16, 2012.

Sunday’s broadcast featured Steve Kroft’s report on the federal disability insurance program, Lara Logan’s story on the battle that inspired the film, “Black Hawk Down,” and an Anderson Cooper segment on potentially dangerous near-Earth objects such as comets and asteroids.

NBC News Takes a Rare Look Inside Secret CIA Museum, Though CBS Beat Them To It

On “NBC Nightly News” last night, correspondent Richard Engel presented a piece from inside one of the most secretive museums in the world, the CIA Museum located in the agency’s headquarters in Virginia.

“Closed to the public, it had only been visited by employees and invited guests until NBC News recently became the first news organization allowed to bring in video cameras,” Engel wrote in a post previewing the piece.

While it was a fascinating segment, and showed amazing artifacts like Osama Bin laden’s AK-47 and a mock-up of his Abbotabad compound, it was not, as a point of order, the first time a news organization went in with cameras (though it was the first time it aired on TV). In 2009 CBS’ “60 Minutes” and correspondent Lara Logan visited the museum, though the footage only made it to the program’s website, and not on-air.

In fairness to NBC, it was not promoted as being the first time a news organization visited on-air during “Nightly.”

You can check out the rpeorts from both Engel and Logan, after the jump.
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’60 Minutes’ Producer Tackled By Military Dog

A “60 Minutes” associate producer took one for the team recently.

If you saw last night’s show you saw Lara Logan‘s piece on the secretive world of elite military dogs — the kind that helped Navy SEAL Team 6 capture Osama bin Laden.

One of Logan’s producer’s, Reuben Heyman-Kantor, volunteered to find out just how tough the dogs are. As you’ll see by the look on his face and the bruise on his arm, they are the real deal. Watch:

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Whose Wallet is This?

In the latest episode of “60 Minutes Sports,” premiering Wednesday on Showtime, Lara Logan talks to one of sports media’s biggest names, who also has one of the fattest wallets we’ve ever seen. See who after the jump.


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A Brief Timeline Of American TV Correspondent Kidnappings, Injuries and Deaths

NBC News chief foreign correspondent Richard Engel is safe, after being kidnapped in Syria late last week and released overnight. Unfortunately, kidnappings, injuries and death are part of the job of the foreign correspondent and their crew. With stories out of Afghanistan, Iraq, Pakistan, Syria, Egypt and Libya in the last few years, just about every news outlet has had at least a handful of staffers affected by violence or misfortune.

In April, 2003, NBC News correspondent David Bloom died in Iraq due to a blood clot.

In June, 2003, NBC News Soundman Jeremy Little was mortally wounded in a grenade attack in Iraq. He was treated in Landstuhl, Germany but succumbed a few days later to a post-operative infection.

In January, 2006, ABC anchor Bob Woodruff and camera operator Doug Vogt were badly injured in Iraq when a roadside bomb exploded next to the vehicle they were traveling in.

In May, 2006 CBS camera operator Paul Douglas and sound technician James Brolan were killed in Iraq when the U.S. Army unit they were embedded with came under attack. CBS correspondent Kimberly Dozier was seriously wounded in the attack and survived.

In August, 2006 Fox News Channel correspondent Steve Centanni and camera operator Olaf Wiig were kidnapped while reporting in Gaza. Centanni’s family would make a televised plea for their safe return, and they were eventually freed. Wiig would see another incident in Egypt in 2011 (see below).

In May, 2007 ABC News camera operator Alaa Uldeen Aziz and sound technician Saif Laith Yousuf were killed in Iraq when the car they were traveling in was ambushed.

In August, 2008 Fox News camera operator Chris Jackson was injured in Afghanistan while traveling with Oliver North.

In August, 2009 CBS News correspondent Cami McCormick was injured in Afghanistan when the vehicle she was traveling in was hit by an IED.

February 2011 saw a number of incidents, particularly in Egypt:
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