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Posts Tagged ‘Mark Halperin’

The Ticker: Halperin & Heilemann, Walters & Sterling, Shriver & Spielberg

  • Mark Halperin and John Heilemann are the new lead political team for all Bloomberg platforms – TV, radio, mobile, Web, digital and print. The first in a series of new brands, Bloomberg Politics will be led by the two veteran journalists and best-selling authors.

  • On “The View” this morning Barbara Walters talked about her attempt to interview Donald Sterling last week. “He was going to do an interview, and then he didn’t, and then he did… So it’s very erratic. It’s hard to pin down.” Walters’s interview with V. Stiviano took place 35 minutes before “20/20″ went on the air Friday night.

  • To mark the 20th anniversary of the release of “Schindler’s List,” Steven Spielberg talks with NBC News’s Maria Shriver about his new project “I Witness” which tells the true stories of genocide survivors.

Mark Halperin: ‘By His Own Admission’ Bashir Was Out Of Line

Mark Halperin“Double Down” authors and MSNBC analysts Mark Halperin and John Heilemann talked to Larry King about Martin Bashir’s vile comments about Sarah Palin in an interview set to air Thursday.

“Well, he apologized for it, and you know, live TV…” Halperin said, adding, “By his own admission,” Bashir was out of line. Halperin knows what can happen on live TV. The MSNBC contributor was suspended by MSNBC in 2011 for calling President Obama “kind of a dick” live on-air. He was asked his opinion, and thought he’d be “bleeped” but the control room didn’t catch it in time.

Heilemann suggested it’s fine to have passionate arguments on-air, but important to keep things civil, pointing out Palin’s comments linking America’s debt to slavery were out of line too, but the difference is there was no personal attack.

King’s interview airs on RT America Thursday at 9pmET. King’s interview with MediabistroTV: My First Big Break, is after the jump…

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Sorry is Easy. In the Case of Martin Bashir, Suspension Seems to be the Hardest Word

Martin Bashir 304Judging strictly by precedent at MSNBC, if Martin Bashir had called Sarah Palin a ‘cocksucking fag,’ ‘right wing slut,’ ‘dick,’ ‘pimp,’ or ‘nappy headed ho,’ he would be on suspension, at the very least.

Instead, Bashir is a free man. All he said about Palin on Nov. 15 was that she should be forced to have someone defecate in her mouth and urinate in her eyes as punishment for her remarks on slavery.

What’s wrong with this picture? Plenty, if one considers MSNBC’s long history of Foot in Mouth disease. In every case, the commentator was either suspended or fired. In every case, the perps have been men, and in every case but one, the broadcast slurs have been aimed at women.

Ten days ago, actor Alec Baldwin was benched for two weeks after he was caught on video calling a paparazzi a ‘cocksucking fag.’ He may not return.

In 2011, Ed Schultz and Mark Halperin were both suspended — Schultz for labelling conservative commentator Laura Ingraham a ‘right wing slut,’ and Halperin for describing President Obama as a ‘dick.’ (Sidebar: If it had been Nixon, Halperin would have been technically correct.)

In ’08, David Shuster served two weeks for saying that Chelsea Clinton was being pimped out to support her mother’s campaign. And in ’07, Don Imus’ description of the Rutgers women’s basketball team as ‘nappy headed hos’ got him fired.

Like all his predecessors, Bashir apologized – the latest to join the celebrity culture of contrition. In a statement Friday, MSNBC said Bashir had also apologized to the Palin family, that he’s “committed to elevating the discourse” and that the network was handling the matter internally.

Still, many critics argue that Bashir deserves harsher punishment.

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Mitt Romney Ignored Adviser’s Plea To Win ‘Media Wars,’ Select Chris Christie As VP

Christie and Romney _480x360On “Morning Joe” today, “Double Down: Game Change 2012″ co-authors Mark Halperin and John Heilemann reported an interesting nugget about the 2012 Vice Presidential vetting process: after one of his top adviser’s pleaded with him to choose New Jersey Governor Chris Christie as his vice presidential running mate—in order to recapture the media wars—Mitt Romney declined, citing “too many red flags.”

According to Halperin, Romney campaign senior adviser, Stuart Stevens, urged the Republican presidential nominee to select Christie as his No. 2, depicting the Romney campaign as being in the midst of a presidential “street fight” where they were “losing the media wars everyday in the news to Barack Obama,” and viewing Christie as the savior “street fighter” who could help them win the media battle.

Even with this impassioned plea, Romney declined, concerned with information Christie wouldn’t provide the Romney team during the vetting process, which included lobbying connections Christie had to disgraced financier Bernie Madoff before he was Governor, and a civil settlement Christie’s brothers had with the SEC.

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As Shutdown Ends, A Toast to Chris Matthews’ Account of Political Compromise

MSNBC’s Chris Matthews was feted last night at the New York book party for his seventh book, “Tip and the Gipper: When Politics Worked.” The book, a historical account of political opponents who managed to work together, coincidentally hit the shelves on the first day of the government shutdown.

Matthews arrived at P.J. Clarke’s in Lincoln Center shortly before the senate vote to end the shutdown Wednesday night. He told TVNewser he combined multiple sources — including news clips, President Reagan’s diaries and his own journal from his time in as O’Neill’s administrative assistant — to create a “hologram” account of the time period. Asked how he juggles it all, he said he wrote at home before and after his “Hardball” work day, joking that his wife began to refer to the chair in his office as “that chair.”

We also chatted with newly-minted MSNBC host Ronan Farrow, who says he’ll spend the next few months developing his vision for his show ahead of an early 2014 launch. (Farrow was coy about the show’s time slot, which MSNBC has so far only said will be a “weekday, one-hour” program.) Also on hand to toast Matthews at P.J. Clarke’s: MSNBC president Phil Griffin, Dan Rather, Mark Halperin, MSNBC analyst Ed Rendell and “CBS This Morning” executive producer Chris Licht.

HBO Options ‘Game Change’ Sequel

The authors of the book Game Change are working on a follow-up to their 2010 best-seller called Double Down: Game Change 2012. HBO, which aired a made-for-TV movie based on the first book, has already optioned the sequel for a movie.

John Heileman and Mark Halperin will release Double Down: Game Change 2012 in Fall 2013. It will, not surprisingly, focus on the 2012 Presidential campaign between President Obama and Mitt Romney.

The original Game Change debuted on bookshelves in January, 2010, and debuted on HBO in March of this year. The movie became famous for Julianne Moore‘s portrayal of Sarah Palin as much as anything else, and garnered a more-than respectable 2.1 million live viewers.

Charlie Rose Meets the Press, a Lot of Them, in Post-Debate Show

If you’re looking for the most ecumenical post-debate coverage tonight, check out Charlie Rose‘s PBS show. The “CBS This Morning” co-anchor is up late with a live debate wrap up with guests spanning many TV networks and publications, including:

Chuck Todd, NBC News
John Dickerson, CBS News
Martha Raddatz, ABC News
Gwen Ifill, PBS Newshour
Mark Halperin, Time Magazine
John Heilemann, New York Magazine
Tina Brown, Newsweek/ Daily Beast
Albert Hunt, Bloomberg News

A Diverse Crowd For ‘Morning Joe’ In Tampa

MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” originates this week from Howl at the Moon, a bar just outside the convention center in Tampa that has been dubbed “Morning Joe Elephant Bar” for the duration of the Republican National Convention.

This morning, people arrived as early as 4:45 a.m. — just a few hours after last call at the bar, which is remaining open at night this week — to watch the show.

During commercial breaks, hosts Joe Scarborough and Mika Brzezinski interacted with the crowd, asking for a show of hands on political affiliation (split down the middle, with a handful of independents) and home state (overwhelmingly Florida, although there are a few stragglers from as far as Maine and Arizona). After he finished his segments, former RNC chairman Michael Steele mingled with the crowd, shaking hands and taking pictures.

“I love the energy. We live for these shows,” Willie Geist tells TVNewser. “Four years ago during the primaries we started doing them in Iowa and New Hampshire, and we totally got the bug.”

In addition to Chuck Todd and David Gregory, Scarborough and Brzezinski’s guests today included Grover Norquist, Eugene Robinson and Mike Murphy.

“So many of these politicians and strategists we talk to on remote sometimes,” Geist said. “It’s nice to have them on, in place, sort of passing through like they’re walking into a coffee shop, and you can sit down and talk with them.”

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A Politico Sunday Show?

The Huffington Post’s Michael Calderone writes about Politico in the site’s iPad-only magazine “Huffington.” As we have noted over the last few months, Politico has been expanding its video efforts, particularly on big election nights.

Calderone reveals that in 2010 the site wanted to launch its own Sunday public-affairs show, anchored by Mark Halperin, a Time columnist and MSNBC regular. You can download Huffington. from iTunes here if you want to read the entire thing.

So far no online startup has dared challenge the broadcast or cable networks on Sunday mornings, but as more and more people watch video online, that will surely change. The Wall Street Journal launched its own weekday show from Washington recently, and HuffPost has its own plans in the works with HuffPost Live.

‘Game Change’ Review: Cliché with Compassion

“Game Change” is not a flawless docudrama. Neither is it, in the words of a conservative blogger, “a heinous piece of propaganda” for Obama.

What “Game Change” is, at its essence, is a wildly-entertaining cautionary tale about presidential politics. Moral of the story: Be careful what you wish for.

“Game Change,” which debuts on HBO Saturday, follows Sen. John McCain‘s disastrous decision to name then-unknown Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin as his Republican running mate in 2008. It’s based on the best seller of the same title by reporters Mark Halperin and John Heilemann, both of whom served as consultants.

McCain and Palin, among others in their respective camps, have made so much noise about the alleged inaccuracies of “Game Change” (sight unseen) that HBO included a letter in its media kit, defending Danny Strong’s script. For HBO, that is not an everyday occurrence.

This much is beyond dispute – Julianne Moore and Ed Harris give remarkable performances as Palin and McCain.

Moore, a four-time Oscar nominee, perfectly mimics Palin’s speech in its distinctive rhythm, pitch, and scrappin’ of consonants. She doesn’t go too far, however, allowing her to avoid the level of parody by Tina Fey on “Saturday Night Live.” (In a nice touch, Moore is shown watching the “SNL” clips.)

Harris is equally impressive in his McCain incarnation. The actors’ eyes alone speak volumes, particularly in the scene where his Alpha-dog chief strategist, Steve Schmidt (played to the

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