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Posts Tagged ‘Matthew Chance’

More Correspondents Travel to Ukraine

fox ukraineMore correspondents are up and running from Ukraine as Russian and Ukrainian forces remain in a tense standoff in the country’s Crimea region. Secretary of State John Kerry, who flew to Kiev overnight, meets with government officials there today.

Several correspondents are traveling to Kiev with Secretary Kerry, including NBC chief foreign affairs correspondent Andrea Mitchell, ABC chief global affairs correspondent Martha Raddatz and CBS State Department correspondent Margaret Brennan.

Fox News’ Shepard Smith is in Kiev, where he will anchor “Shepard Smith Reporting” from Kiev and report across all Fox News’ programs today. Tomorrow he will anchor and report from Crimea.

CNN has a number of correspondents in the region, including Matthew Chance, Anna Coren and Claudia Rebaza in Kiev and Diana Magnay and Ben Wedeman in Crimea.

Also in Ukraine, as we told you yesterday: Terry Moran and Alex Marquardt for ABC, Bill Neely and Ian Williams for NBC, Elizabeth Palmer, Clarissa Ward, and Charlie D’Agata for CBS, Anderson Cooper for CNN, Amy Kellogg for Fox News, and Nick Schifrin, Jennifer Glasse, and Phil Ittner for Al Jazeera America.

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Special Live ‘Your Money’ to Cover French and Greek Elections

Normally on tape, CNN’s “Your Money will be live Sunday at 3pmET focusing on the second round of the French presidential election as well as the election in Greece tomorrow. Ali Velshi and Christine Romans host, along with Paris-based correspondent Jim Bitterman and Hala Gorani from Paris, Matthew Chance from Athens, Al Goodman from Madrid and John Defterios from Abu Dhabi.

The Death of the Foreign Correspondent? Not So Much

A year ago today we wrote about one of those annual “predictions” stories. It was from Mashable’s Vadim Lavrusik who had a host of predictions for the news media in 2011. This was No. 6:

6. The Death of the ‘Foreign Correspondent’

Lavrusik, who is also an adjunct professor at Columbia University’s journalism school, argued that news organizations would rely “heavily on stringers and, in many cases, social content uploaded by the citizenry.”

How right he was… and wasn’t.

While much of the video from the Arab Spring and Japanese earthquake & tsunami — two of the biggest stories on the planet this year — was user generated: captured on smartphones, uploaded to video sites and shared around the world on social networks, it took the network correspondents to put into perspective what we were seeing, to interview some of those captured on video (or who captured the video), and put into greater context what it all means. That’s really their job. So that at the end of a 1-minute 45-second package or 2-minute live shot, we all have a better understanding of the story.

This year, the networks did not rely “heavily on stringers,” the news was simply too broad and complex and the competition too great. No network wants to be left out.

So they dug deep into their pockets and sent in correspondents and anchors to report what was happening. Brian Williams, Diane Sawyer, Anderson Cooper, Scott Pelley, even Barbara Walters have all traveled the globe this year for their networks. ABC’s Christiane Amanpour racked up more stamps on her passport and NBC’s Richard Engel and CBS’s Lara Logan — who

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CNN Correspondents Talk Life and Death on the Frontlines


CNN correspondents (l-r) Sara Sidner, Ben Wedeman, Kyung Lah, Nic Robertson, Arwa Damon, Anderson Cooper, Matthew Chance, Hala Gorani, and Ivan Watson gathered at the Time Warner Center Dec. 2 for a taping of “CNN on the Frontlines”

Earlier this month, just for a matter of hours really, CNN’s intrepid foreign correspondents left their beats covering the Middle East, North Africa and beyond, gathering at the Time Warner Center in New York. TVNewser was there as the correspondents recounted the year that was: from the Arab Spring, to the civil war in Libya and the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear catastrophe in Japan.

Naturally, the cameras were rolling and tonight Anderson Cooper hosts a one hour special called “CNN on the Frontlines.” The broadcast airs at 8pmET and 10pmET/PT and will reair tomorrow at 8pmET and Christmas Day at 7pmET and 11pmET.

> Related: Sara Sidner talks with TVGuide Magazine’s Stephen Battaglio about her move from local TV news to foreign correspondent: “I’m a different person. The way I react to stories has changed. The level of what is an amazing moment or what is stressful has gone beyond anything I can ever imagine.”

(Photo: David Holloway / CNN)

Rare Get-together for CNN’s Foreign Correspondents as They Reflect on 2011

CNN’s Anderson Cooper hosts a year end special with CNN’s foreign correspondents, including (l-r) Ben Wedeman, Arwa Damon and Nic Robertson

It’s a good thing today was a relatively quite international news day because most of CNN’s foreign correspondents were gathered in New York talking about about the incredible year that was. From the Arab Spring to the triple tragedy in Japan, reporters Nic Robertson, Ben Wedeman, Arwa Damon, Hala Gorani, Matthew Chance, Sara Sidner, Kyung Lah and Ivan Watson crowded into Piers Morgan‘s studio at Time Warner Center where Anderson Cooper, who’s also reported from many of the world’s hotspots this year, lead the discussion.

CNN International EVP Tony Maddox tells TVNewser the get-together, which happens once every few years, “was the greatest gathering of foreign journalists on the planet.”

Before the taping we asked Robertson what is his most remarkable moment of this remarkable year. Robertson, who started as an engineer with CNN in 1990, says it was the uprising in Bahrain in February. “We were approaching Pearl Square and all hell was breaking loose.” Robertson used his iPhone to report live on CNN. Later, as he was rushed out of the area, he used the phone to record more video and his audio for a package that was edited in Atlanta. “That’s a far cry from 36 boxes of equipment we used to use,” added CNN EVP Ken Jautz

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CNN Producer Who Talked Gunmen Into Letting Journalists Out of Rixos Hotel Shares Her Story

When the foreign journalists were released from Tripoli’s Rixos hotel earlier this week, they credited the Red Cross, as well as some Arabic-speaking colleagues with convincing the guards to let them leave.

As noted by the BBC’s Matthew Price, one of those journalists was CNN producer Jomana Karadsheh, who was working with Matthew Chance when they became trapped in the hotel.

Karadsheh spoke about the situation to Anderson Cooper last night, explaining how she built a relationship with one of the guards, eventually leading herself and the other journalists to freedom:

CNN’s Matthew Chance, FNC’s Steve Harrigan Talk Libya, Coming Home

CNN correspondent Matthew Chance speaks to the LA Times’ James Rainey about his ordeal in the Rixos hotel in Tripoli, Libya. The most touching moment came at the end of the interview, where Chance mentions that he most looking forward to returning to England, so he can take his young daughter to school:

On Wednesday evening, Chance said he was still looking for a good meal and to rotating out of the war zone. He has been based for several years in Moscow, but is relocating to London with his wife and young girl. “She starts school Sept. 5. I want to be able to take her.”

Chance said he will be back to cover the Libyan revolution. He is not sure when. But he knows one thing: “I’m not going back to the Rixos. I wouldn’t give it a good review at all.”

Elsewhere, Fox News Channel’s Steve Harrigan speaks to Men’s Journal about covering Libya, and the camaraderie that develops between his crew:

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CNN, Fox News, BBC Journalists Freed from Rixos Hotel in Tripoli

Journalists from a number of outlets, including CNN, Fox News and the BBC have been trapped inside the Rixos hotel in Tripoli, Libya over the last few days. While most of Tripoli has fallen from Colonel Gadhaffi’s grasp, the Rixos has remained under loyalist control. The result was that around 40 foreign journalists were trapped inside the hotel, with guards threatening to shoot them if they attempted to flee.

Thankfully, around 10:45 AM ET, CNN’s Matthew Chance reported via Twitter that the journalists had been freed.

Earlier, Chance explained the tense situation to Anderson Cooper:

Update: Video of Chance’s report following the release from the hotel is after the jump.
Update 2: Video from the BBC featuring their correspondent Matthew Price, is also after the jump.
Update 3: Video from Fox News Channel’s Tadek Markowski is also after the jump.

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Foreign Correspondents, Both Trapped and Free, File Reports from Tripoli

The situation in Tripoli, Libya continues to evolve every hour, and the result has been a series of compelling reports from foreign correspondents in-country.

Update: CNN’s Sara Sidner is outside of Gadhaffi’s compound, and is reporting that rebels have captured the building and are celebrating. She says she has seen files that the rebels have removed from the compound.

CNN and CNN International are going into co=production with Libya coverage, with Suzanne Malveaux and Michael Holmes anchoring.

On “AC360″ last night, CNN’s Matthew Chance–who is trapped in the Rixos Hotel along with a handful of other foreign journalists–told Anderson Cooper about a strange appearance by Colonel Gadhaffi’s son Saif at the complex:

On MSNBC, Richard Engel has been live all morning on a rooftop overlooking Gadhaffi’s compound. After some stray bullets were fired not far from his location, he would put on a thick armored helmet for future live-shots:
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Covering the Imminent Fall of Tripoli

CNN is going into overdrive tonight covering what Libyan rebels hope is the imminent fall of Tripoli. CNN is simulcasting CNN International programming anchored by Hala Gorani and Michael Holmes with Wolf Blitzer in D.C. Correspondent Matthew Chance is reporting from inside a hotel in Tripoli where Gadhafi government minders had been monitoring the foreign press, but have left. During one short report, Chance said to Gorani, “At the moment we really don’t know what’s going to happen next. Hala, I think I’m going to have to leave it there.” Meanwhile, Sara Sidner is reporting from the road on her way to Tripoli. The plan is to stay live throughout the night and into the morning.

Fox News is also providing extended coverage with Harris Faulkner anchoring, preempting “Huckabee,” with contributions from Sky News.

MSNBC is covering the news during updates of regular programming.

On the broadcast evening newscasts, only NBC News had their own correspondent in Tripoli. Richard Engel appeared live with a group of Libyan rebels, some of whom walked up to 15 miles to the capital earlier today. CBS News used a reporter from Sky News and ABC had a phoner from a BBC reporter while ABC’s Jeffrey Kofman reported from the Tunisia/Libya border.

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