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Posts Tagged ‘Nielsen’

U.S. Loses 472,000 TV Households in the Last Year

Nielsen is out with its annual list of the top TV markets. And while there are no big changes — New York is still #1, Los Angeles #2, Chicago #3, and Glendive, MT is still #210 — the company estimates there are now 114,173,690 U.S. television households. That’s down -472,620 (-.4%) from last year as more households forgo TV and get their video news and entertainment from the web and web-enabled devices — or chose not to get it at all. But with a growing general population, now nearing 315,000,000, any retreat is troubling news for networks and stations that depend on the delivery television provides, and the advertising revenue that goes along with it.

Read on for the complete list of TV markets, including which grew (Los Angeles, Dallas) and which did not (New York, Philadelphia).

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Post World Cup, America Doesn't Care About Soccer

In another life, I work as a reporter covering the United States men’s national soccer team. As you certainly know, the World Cup took place this summer and ratings jumped 41 percent. People cared.

So did editors. At least for the three- to six-month period before the tournament. Multiple editors asked me if I could write stories for them explaining the World Cup, and I was only too happy to oblige. Spreading the gospel, etc., etc. Then, the United States lost and… crickets. Suddenly, no one cared anymore and interest dried up.

Now, I’m not surprised – soccer is a fringe sport, one that’s entirely driven by the World Cup – but the sheer immediacy of it all was a bit shocking. There was interest, and then there was none. Google Trends reflects this reality. The graphic above shows the search term “soccer.” The spike is the World Cup, then it returns to pre-World Cup levels.

A longer view is even more telling. The graphic below shows two spikes – the 2006 World Cup and the ’10 event. Huge spikes, then massive valleys. The beautiful game isn’t gaining much ground.

At least 2014 is only four years away.