TVSpy LostRemote AgencySpy PRNewser FishbowlNY FishbowlDC SocialTimes AllFacebook GalleyCat UnBeige MediaJobsDaily

Posts Tagged ‘Paul Farhi’

Brian Stelter Makes ‘Reliable Sources’ Debut

StelterRS304Brian Stelter, who filled in a few times on “Reliable Sources” the last few months, made his debut as host of the CNN media criticism show this morning. Stelter covered this week’s revolving media door, President Obama‘s media criticism, and the death of Nelson Mandela.

Stelter opened with a panel on Martin Bashir‘s resignation and Sam Champion‘s move to The Weather Channel.

NPR media critic Eric Deggans criticized MSNBC for not suspending Bashir immediately for Bashir’s vile comments toward Sarah Palin, while The Washington Post’s Paul Farhi doubted Bashir’s resignation, suggesting MSNBC President Phil Griffin probably asked him to leave, and allowed Bashir to resign. American University professor Jane Hall said if Bashir didn’t leave, MSNBC would be in the uncomfortable position of looking less bothered by vile comments toward women than about Alec Baldwin‘s anti-gay slurs.

Read more

Mediabistro Course

Mediabistro Job Fair

Mediabistro Job FairLand your next big gig! Join us on January 27 at the Altman Building in New York City for an incredible opportunity to meet with hiring managers from the top New York media companies, network with other professionals and industry leaders, and land your next job. Register now!
 

London Olympics Opening Ceremony Underway

The Opening Ceremony of the London Olympics is underway. But if you’re in the U.S., you’ll have to a wait a couple more hours to see the broadcast on NBC. The Openings will still be going on when “Nightly News,” with Brian Williams in London, and the other evening newscasts go on the air at 6:30pmET. As NBC has the rights to the games, you can bet you’ll see more coverage tonight, and for the next two weeks, than on their competitors.

The Washington Post’s Paul Farhi breaks down the numbers of how past Olympics have been covered differently by the News divisions of NBC, which as the rights, and ABC and CBS which don’t. One critic calls what we’re about to see on NBC “shameless cross promotion.”

“There’s no journalistic fig leaf to hide behind,” says Andrew Tyndall, the publisher of the Tyndall Report, which tracks the network news business. “It’s free advertising for the prime-time programming.”

NBC’s VP of newsgathering David Verdi disagrees: “You might see a little more coverage [of the event] on our broadcasts,” he said. “We’re proud of it. It generates greater interest in the news,” adding “if the question is, is our editorial process corrupted by an event like this, then the answer is no. We use the same editorial checklist to determine coverage [of the Olympics] as we would for any news event.”

On CNN, A Discussion About CNN’s — and Others’ — Falling Ratings

“It’s no secret that CNN’s ratings have suffered the most, even though all three are down,” Howard Kurtz said as he discussed falling cable news ratings on “Reliable Sources” Sunday.

“I respect CNN for trying to be a straight news channel at a time when it is certainly easier or cheaper to go the partisan or opinionated route that MSNBC has done following the lead of Fox News,” said Kurtz.

The Washington Post’s Paul Farhi says it’s a good strategy for CNN, only because if the network turned an ideological corner now, that street of viewers would already be taken.

“The cable networks have figured out that you can’t rely on the news cycle, you’ve got to get appointment television. Partisanship by MSNBC and Fox has been the strategy. CNN’s strategy has been to play it down the middle. If it went more partisan, it would be dividing a market that is already occupied.”

Leon Harris on Becoming a ‘Real News Grown-Up’

Leon Harris.jpgFormer CNN anchor Leon Harris is profiled by the Washington Post‘s Paul Farhi.

Harris tells of a rough childhood due to trying family circumstances, and of his big break at CNN, where he started as a researcher and editor.

After some twenty years at the network, the Iraq War began. Farhi writes that Harris became CNN’s “cut-in king”. Harris instead wanted the chance to report from Iraq, but says he was turned down. “It was clear to me that they didn’t think I was as good as I thought I could be,” he tells Farhi. “I think they thought I was a good guy, a team player, but I wasn’t a real news grown-up. If I didn’t leave, I knew I wouldn’t feel like a grown-up.”

Harris joined Washington, DC ABC affiliate WJLA-TV, where Farhi says he is “its signature face”. Since signing Harris, “WJLA has moved from third in the news ratings to a solid second…”

Asked about the future of television news, Harris is pessimistic. “Now it’s blurred with entertainment. Who’s CNN’s number one news figure? He’s a guy who hosted ‘The Mole’. We all do the same five stories over and over. Six minutes on a story? Forget it. Rwanda could happen today, and we wouldn’t cover it.”

Where To Watch The Obamas’ First Dance? ABC Only, For Now

abc_1-18.jpgSprinkled within the generous helping of Inauguration coverage on every network will be a few moments that are only offered on specific channels. The Washington Post’s Paul Farhi writes about some of the exclusive deals made between the Presidential Inauguration Committee (PIC) and networks like HBO, MTV and ABC.

But Bryan Boughton, FNC’s D.C. bureau manager and the network bureau chief chair of the press pool from January-April, is speaking up about ABC’s plans. ABC is currently set to air the first Inaugural ball (“Neighborhood Inaugural Ball”) Tuesday night, restricting other networks from airing any of President-elect Barack Obama‘s remarks until 10pmET (previously 1amET) and the Obamas’ first dance.

“It’s a moment in history and all Americans should share that,” Boughton tells TVNewser today. “All networks should take it live. We’re not asking that the whole ball is opened up. We do not consider the remarks entertainment. We consider that fair use as it happens.”

Boughton has been working with Obama press secretary Robert Gibbs, representing the PIC, and ABC News, representing ABC Entertainment, to work toward a compromise. “We don’t know what the end result will be,” says Boughton. “I think both sides…have been dealing with us in good faith in trying to come to some resolution with this.”

According to The Washington Post, Disney paid $2 million to air a children’s concert on the Disney Channel and the Inaugural ball on ABC.

Gustav Aftermath: Surveying the Cabler Scene

gustav_9-2.JPGAs Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal is saying in a presser taken by all three cablers this morning, there are no reports of widespread flooding in the Gulf Coast. Luckily, the damage seems to be minimal, which means focus appears to be shifting back to the RNC. Let’s take a look at the aftermath of cabler coverage:

• The Hollywood Reporter’s Paul J. Gough focuses on two of the “network stars,” at the forefront of the coverage, NBC’s Brian Williams and FNC’s Shepard Smith. Both described “polar opposite” response between Katrina and Gustav. “Smith, who drew praise for his coverage of Katrina in 2005, agreed that it was a different New Orleans and Gulf Coast that dealt with Hurricane Gustav,” wrote Gough.

• The Washington Post’s Paul Farhi explains the weather coverage creed: “participation is mandatory.” He describes some of the stand-out live shots from yesterday, including CNN’s Rob Marciano getting, “nearly blown off a New Orleans rooftop,” and “champion weather-interacter,” Geraldo Rivera.

Alessandra Stanley writes in the New York Times about the more subdued coverage as compared to Katrina. “Conceding on the evening news that the storm was not as bad as expected, Mr. Williams, his shirt dry, his hair only gently ruffled by wind, downscaled Gustav to ‘a sizable weather event,’” she wrote.