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Posts Tagged ‘Rodney Harrison’

Time Names Bleacher Report and Grantland Among 50 Best Websites of 2011

The sports website Bleacher Report gets a lot of grief in the sports blogging community. The Sports Pickle, a satire site run by the esteemed D.J. Gallo, recently ran this mock-up of Bleacher Report‘s newly redesigned front page, and it hits on all the perceived shortcomings of the upstart website — spelling errors, annoying slideshows that boost page views, untimely columns about staid topics, stupid columns about stupid topics, etc.

Nevertheless a lot of people read Bleacher Report, which claims to be the 4th-largest sports media site in the U.S. with 20 million monthly readers. Mind you, this traffic is no doubt buoyed by some voodoo search engine optimization, which seems to put BR articles at the top of most sports-related Google searches. Perhaps that helps explain why Time magazine named Bleacher Report one of its Top 50 websites of 2011. Here’s the write-up from Harry McCracken, a name we believe to be real.

At Bleacher Report, the sports reporting isn’t performed by a tiny staff of full-time journalists – it’s done by thousands of fan-contributors, which is why it feels so deep and so passionate. The standard of quality is markedly higher than at some community-created news hubs, where “citizen journalist” can be a synonym for “poorly paid amateur.” Like a sports-themed variant of the Huffington Post, the site has a penchant for wacky lists and sideshows. Many of them, like “50 Bold Predictions for the Rest of the MLB Season,” are nicely done, not just fluffy filler. Read more

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Surprise Choice For SI Media Person Of The Year

Richard Deitsch of Sports Illustrated handed out his Media Awards for 2010 and his person of the year was an unusual choice to say the least.

Mike Pereira, the NFL’s former Vice President of Officiating, was selected as Deitsch’s person of the year for his role as NFL rules analyst for Fox Sports. Deitsch goes on to explain why he selected Pereira:

Viewers have longed for broadcasters to provide accurate explanations from the NFL’s byzantine rule book, and Pereira, thankfully, has taken the burden off ex-jocks and announcers, who can come off as befuddled as fans. He has correctly predicted the outcome of 49 of 50 replay challenges this season (he disagreed with the judgment of the refs on a DeSean Jackson reception that was ruled a catch and fumble; Pereira predicted the refs would overturn a play to an incomplete pass), but more importantly, he has imbued viewers with added knowledge. Read more

Harvard Student Group Tackles Your Favorite Sports Problems

Those Harvard kids sure do know their sports. Well, at least some of them do. Specifically, we refer to the Harvard Sports Analysis Collective, a “student organization dedicated to quantitative analysis of sports strategy and management.” They produce some of the smartest sports analysis this side of Bill James.

On Monday, graduate advisor and former HSAC president Daniel Granoff published a post discussing the rash of errors in the first round of baseball. It’s not our favorite post – preferring others such as the always popular subject of giving up touchdowns and an explanation of the men’s tennis ranking system – but it’s packed with solid stats.

Errors of every sort came pouring in; no play was routine. The Giants, Braves, Phillies and Reds combined to produce a total of 37 runs in their series. Of those, 12 were unearned from a total of 15 errors. That means 32.4% of the runs scored in the two National League Division Series were the results of errors. Compare this to the regular season, where only 8% of the total runs were unearned.

The takeaway: If you want to get smarter, read this site.

ESPN Can't Break Into the LA Market

Local is all the rage these days. But can a massive sports media entity force its way into the conversation?

It’s harder than it looks.

Los Angeles Times columnist James Rainey takes a gander at ESPN’s foray into the city’s sports market and comes up with some telling observation. Namely, in the words of one unnamed “insider,” the network expected more than the 2.7 million unique visitors to its Los Angeles-branded site.

Additionally, local sites in Boston, New York, Dallas, and Chicago are struggling to gain a foothold. Read more