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Posts Tagged ‘Roger Mudd’

Diane Sawyer Signs Off ‘World News:’ ‘I’ll See You Right Back Here on ABC News, Very Soon’

SawyerFinalIn what may be the most subdued evening news transition since John Chancellor handed off “NBC Nightly News” to Tom Brokaw and Roger Mudd in 1982, Diane Sawyer signed off “World News” tonight. ABC hadn’t announced when Sawyer’s final show would air. That news came in a tweet from Sawyer this afternoon.

After a first block of news of the day, the second block included a David Muir “Made in America” report, a franchise which started under Sawyer’s watch. Muir said the ABC team has produced 154 reports and three updates since the series started three years ago. Sawyer then passed the torch her successor. “You know his command and commitment to bringing you the news, and let me just say to you personally right here, I cannot wait to see you in high gear. Let it begin.”

The third block took viewers behind the scenes, with a piece on those who put the show together: producers, writers, editors, correspondents, graphic designers, production crew and more. “Our teams across the country, our teams around the globe working under tight deadlines every single day,” said Sawyer, who then gave viewers a live peek into the control room. Here’s Sawyer’s final block goodbye:  Read more

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Tom Brokaw, Roger Mudd Give Back to Their Alma Maters

Veteran newsers Roger Mudd and Tom Brokaw both have announced major pledges to their alma maters:

> NBC’s Brokaw and wife Meredith have established the Tom and Meredith Brokaw Scholarship program with a $100,000 gift to the school from which both graduated (Tom, ’64, and Meredith, ’62), the University of South Dakota.

Scholarships will go to students who graduated from a South Dakota high school and who exemplify the characteristics of America’s “greatest generation”.  The Brokaws are both native South Dakotans, and Tom Brokaw, of course, is the author of the 1998 bestseller The Greatest Generation.

>Former CBS, NBC, and PBS newsman Mudd has donated $4 million to his alma mater, Washington and Lee University, to establish the Roger Mudd Center for the Study of Professional Ethics and to endow a Roger Mudd Professorship in Ethics.  

Mudd is a 1950 graduate of W&L. ”For 60 years,” he says, “I’ve been waiting for a chance to acknowledge Washington and Lee’s gifts to me. Given the state of ethics in our current culture, this seems a fitting time to endow a center for the study of ethics, and my university is its fitting home.”

W&L also serves as home to Mudd’s papers, donated to the school this past May.

Former CBS Newsman David Dick Dies at 80

David Dick Photo.jpgFormer CBS News correspondent and bureau chief David Dick died yesterday of cancer at his home in his native Kentucky. He was 80.

Dick worked at CBS from 1966 to 1985, winning an Emmy for his coverage of the assassination attempt on then-presidential candidate George Wallace. Dick also served as South American bureau chief from 1978-1979.

After his years at CBS, Dick went on to become director of the University of Kentucky’s school of journalism. He also wrote several books, including one on his 17-year battle with prostate cancer.

Former CBS colleague Roger Mudd tells the Lexington (KY) Herald-Leader that Dick “was an indefatigable reporter” who was “very, very modest…the television was almost secondary to his desire to get it right and to do it well.”

Walter Cronkite Reassessed

MBNAB4.pngNine months after his death, the life and work of Walter Cronkite was remembered at the RTDNA conference in Las Vegas this morning.

Eight men and women who either worked with, have written about, or are carrying on the legacy of the CBS newsman spoke to a diverse group of past, current and future news managers and reporters — those old enough to have watched him every night and too young to have ever watched him at all, at least not live.

Marcy McGinnis, who worked with Cronkite from the ages of 20 to 31, and who would later become London bureau chief for CBS News, talked about having annual meetings with Cronkite, who was as much a teacher as he was a newsman.

She talked about how, as a 21-year-old news assistant working at the Kennedy Space Center, she unwittingly gave Cronkite’s hotel room number to someone who’d called asking for it. “I never did fess up, but I learned never to give out Walter’s number to a viewer.”

As for his departure from the anchor chair, McGinnis tried to correct the record of an audience questioner about the Cronkite-to-Rather transition: “My recollection wasn’t that the brass tried to push him out, it’s that he reached this mandatory retirement age. Then it came down to Dan Rather and Roger Mudd,” she said, adding: “Dan eventually won the toss-up or however they decided it. Thankfully I wasn’t in management then.”

Don Godfrey, a professor at ASU’s Cronkite School of Journalism told the crowd, “Walter gave us the news we needed to know, not necessarily what the audience wanted to know.” A concept which almost seems quaint in this day and age of personalized information through a variety of online and social media sources.

Bill Silcock, also an associate professor at the Cronkite School says, “Walter would have embraced all of it — Facebook and Twitter. He would have had a great Twitter name.”

The panel simultaneously agreed: “Uncle Walter.” (By the way, it’s taken.)

P1010165.JPG

A photo of former CBS News executive Marcy McGinnis with Walter
Cronkite as part of the Cronkite Reassessed panel at RTDNA.

After the jump: What Walter Cronkite called a “mistake” on his part…

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The Rise of the Emo-Anchor

nyo_4-8.jpgWhat’s with all the on-air emoting?

The New York Observer’s Felix Gillette writes about this trend in the cover story for today’s paper. “Not long ago, television news was a no-cry zone,” he writes. “The top newsmen were celebrated for their emotional control in the face of gut-punching developments.”

But that’s changed. Gillette notes Glenn Beck‘s “We Surround Them” special, Roland Martin‘s tears after President Obama’s election, Rick Santelli‘s rant, Chris Matthews‘ “thrill” and Anderson Cooper‘s Katrina reports as just some of the examples of a changing cable news style.

But not all are happy about it. Roger Mudd, former NBC and CBS anchor, told the Observer, “I’m not sure that I accept blubbering on the air as proof of authenticity…It wasn’t pride so much as you were trained not to do that.”

(illustration by Robert Grossman for the New York Observer)

David Gregory Named Moderator of Meet the Press

GregoryMTP_12.7.jpgAfter a week of speculation, NBC’s Tom Brokaw made it official this morning — David Gregory will become the next moderator of Meet the Press, the longest running show on television.

Gregory joined Brokaw at the end of the broadcast for the announcement. After telling viewers he’d be moving on, Brokaw said, “And to introduce the new moderator of ‘Meet the Press,’ another great friend and cherished colleague, David Gregory who is here with us this morning.” Gregory:

Well, thank you, Tom, this is an incredible honor also to have it come from you because of what you have meant to me in the course of my career and the course of my life. I know how [executive producer] Betsy [Fischer] and I and the staff feel so grateful to you for everything you have brought to the program in such a difficult time after Tim died…You nurtured me in this business. Tim did. And I was in a unique place where I got to see the two very best in journalism up close. I tried to learn a lot and I’ve thought a lot about what it means to succeed somebody like Tim Russert.

And I’m not Tim. But, along with this great team, I can just work real hard to make him proud.

B&D_12.7.jpgGregory follows in the footsteps of Martha Rountree, Lawrence Spivak, Roger Mudd, Marvin Kalb, Chris Wallace and, of course, the longest-serving moderator Tim Russert, who died of a heart attack in June at the age of 58.

Meet the Press began on the radio in 1945 and moved to television in 1947. TVNewser was on hand as the show celebrated its 60th anniversary at the Newseum last November.

The NBC News press release, which includes news about EP Betsy Fischer, is after the jump…

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