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Posts Tagged ‘Ed Rabel’

Ed Rabel Is News Again, On WCHS

rabel wchs_croppedFormer NBC News and CBS News correspondent Ed Rabel, is news once again in Charleston, WV, at least on one local TV station.

Rabel, who is running for Congress, had complained that managers at WCHS, the ABC affiliate in Charleston, told staffers not to cover Rabel’s campaign. That may have been payback for this 2013 op-ed Rabel penned in the Charleston Gazette in which he called local newscasts “a colossal waste of time.”

Well now the MorganCountyUSA website reports WCHS mentioned Rabel’s candidacy on Monday’s 5:30 newscast:

On the segment, WCHS TV newsman Kennie Bass reported on the campaign ads being run by the candidates in the second Congressional district race — Nick Casey (D), Alex Mooney (R) and Ed Rabel (I).

Late last week, WCHS news director Matt Snyder went on defense saying Rabel wasn’t being snubbed.

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WCHS ND Responds to Reports His Station is Ignoring Congressional Candidate

wchs_logoWCHS news director Matt Snyder has responded to claims his newsroom is ignoring Ed Rabel‘s run for Congress.

“Eyewitness News at WCHS-WVAH TV is committed to covering news important to the people of West Virginia without bias or agenda,” Snyder wrote in a statement. “WCHS-WVAH has and will continue to be committed to covering the elections, political races and candidates including the second district race important to our viewers both online and on TV.  We will continue to cover these campaigns and candidates so that voters have the knowledge they need to make an informed decision this November.”

To counter claims of a total cone of silence surrounding Rabel, TVSpy did a quick unscientific Google search, at the urging of Snyder, and saw the Congressional candidate showed up four times on the station’s website: once in a story announcing Rabel was running for Congressonce to say he’d been endorsed by former Green Party candidate Ralph Naderonce to report Rabel was having a campaign kick-off event, and a fourth time in a story about Democratic candidate Nick Casey and Republican candidate Alex Mooney. Read more

Charleston Station told to Ignore Congressional Candidate Because of His Views on Local TV

rabel wchs_croppedCharleston, WV, ABC affiliate WCHS has reportedly told newsroom staff to ignore congressional candidate Ed Rabel because of an op-ed he wrote last year.

The former CBS and NBC correspondent wrote an article for the Charleston Gazette titled “Local TV News is a Waste of Your Time.” In it, he wrote, “the local television ‘news’ landscape is populated by bubble-heads and glib, young, sometimes pretty know-nothings. The truth is, they wouldn’t know a news story if it slapped them in the face.”

Rabel recently announced he was running for the U.S. House 2nd Congressional District as an independent.

Morgan County USA reports, the news director for the Sinclair owned station, Matt Snyder, told his reporters “that no story would be aired on the station about Rabel’s independent campaign for Congress.”

“Everyone in the newsroom was given explicit instructions [by Snyder] to not write [about] or air or interview me,” Rabel told Romenesko.

“Not after what Rabel said in his Charleston Gazette op-ed,” Snyder told Morgan County USA. Read more

WXII GM Hank Price: ‘We live in a new golden age of over-the-air television’

Last week, former NBC News correspondent Ed Rabel excoriated local news, saying the industry is “populated by bubble-heads and glib, young, sometimes pretty know-nothings.” WXII president and general manager Hank Price disagrees, making the case in TVNewsCheck that “leading stations with strong newscasts find themselves offering more services to more people than ever before”:

With the unfortunate weakening of local newspapers, television news has also taken the lead in “accountability journalism,” the investigative, political and consumer journalism that holds government, institutions and businesses accountable to the public.

Perhaps most important, the people who work at television stations live in and are part of their communities.

That sense of community is the reason … North Carolina’s television and radio stations, working together in our state association, the NCAB, [last year] decided to create the largest Vietnam veterans’ “welcome home” celebration ever held.

More than 70,000 people attended. Every television news station in North Carolina produced stories leading up to the event. Stations donated more than $1.5 million in public service announcements, and they jointly aired the event live, all at no charge and with no advertising. No other medium could have pulled it off.

Former NBC News Correspondent: Local News a ‘Waste of Time’

Former NBC News and CBS News correspondent Ed Rabel is not happy with the state of local news, he writes in a Charleston Gazette op-ed. Rabel argues that there is little reason to watch “so-called” local newscasts, calling them “a colossal waste of time”:

Instead of focusing on original reporting, the local stations are focused on cosmetics. Not a country for old men and women, the local television “news” landscape is populated by bubble-heads and glib, young, sometimes pretty know-nothings. The truth is, they wouldn’t know a news story if it slapped them in the face. When was the last time you saw an investigative piece about, let’s see, the Massey Mine disaster? Or, how about, God forbid, an exclusive story that penetrated the precincts where politicians hide their secrets from the public?

There are reasons you don’t get the news on local TV. Station owners and managers forbid their news departments from stepping on toes and ruffling feathers, out of fear that such stories might insult local advertisers or offend politicians on whose toes reporters might stomp.  Read more