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Posts Tagged ‘RTDNA’

Your News Director is Most Likely Named Mike, Julie or David

Male_ND_NamesAccording to Hofstra University professor emeritus Bob Papper who is doing his 20th annual survey of the broadcasting industry for RTDNA, news directors are most likely to be in their mid-40s and be named Mike, Jim, or David if they’re men and Jennifer, Kelly, or Julie if they’re women.

“Apparently I have too much time on my hands,” Papper wrote in the study.

He also says the above named news directors have been at their stations for an average of 5.7 years.

[Poynter.org]

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RTDNA Reminds Newsrooms to Have a Disaster Plan

rtdna logo_304x200Many of us think we can handle anything that comes our way. But as Mike Tyson once said, “Everyone has a plan until they get punched in the mouth.”

With that in mind, RTDNA is offering tips to prepare journalists for action after being metaphorically punched in the mouth by a tornado, hurricane or even earthquake..

Do crisis plans work? Because of advance planning, the radio and television stations of New Orleans were able to continue broadcasting in the wake of the storm, the Grand Forks Herald in North Dakota never missed an issue and KBJR-TV in Minnesota didn’t miss a single newscast despite the disaster. A crisis plan is like having a “go bag” for your entire newsroom. It’s time to start packing.

The RTDNA has link to a handy downloadable list of questions to think about when putting together a plan or checking your newsroom’s existing one. Click here to view.

RTDNA Study: Local News Salaries Fell in 2012

The latest RTDNA/Hofstra University annual survey found that local television news salaries fell 1.9% in 2012.

In a study of newsroom roles, nine average salaries went up, four went down and one stayed the same. The increases in average salaries were “almost all extremely small.” By comparison, 11 median salaries went down, four went up and four stayed the same. The biggest salary jumps proportionally were for news writers and news assistants; only managing editors rose in both average and median salaries.

The RTDNA study found that salaries in the smallest markets were stagnant, while salaries in the top 25 markets and markets 101-150 went up. Markets 26-100 stayed the same.

See the full breakdown by position and by market size here.

RTDNA Study Shows ‘Near-Record’ Year for Local News

It was a “near-record” year for local news, according to the latest RTDNA/Hofstra University study. Despite a six minute drop in the average amount of news produced on weekdays in 2012, Saturday and Sunday news time rose by an average of 12 and 6 minutes, respectively, leading to a small overall increase in the amount of news produced.

The study found almost 37% of news directors reported added a newscast in 2012, with the new broadcasts mostly being added on weekends. Every hour from 4 a.m. to midnight saw at least some new newscasts, the study shows. Only 6% of news directors reported cutting a newscast.

Read the full results here.

Are Drones the Next Must-Have Newsroom Tool?

Drones are normally associated with military operations, but RTDNA chairman Vincent Duffy says the unmanned aircraft may also have a place in the future of journalism. Drones can provide aerial pictures and video — like the kind shown in the video above, from Deadline Detroit’s Bill McGraw — for much cheaper than helicopters:

You won’t be able to drop missiles on the broadcast towers of your competition, but you will be able to get amazing pictures and video you can use to supplement your news stories.

Remote controlled flying machines are nothing new, but their capabilities are significantly increasing while their costs are significantly decreasing, and journalists are starting to experiment with the technology. Read more

Study: Local TV Pay Doesn’t Keep Pace with Inflation

A new study by the Radio Television Digital News Association and Hoftsra University found salaries at local television stations have been losing ground to inflation for the last ten years.

The study tracked salaries at local TV stations over a five and ten year period.  In the period between 2007 and 2012, while inflation rose by 12 percent, local TV pay rose by only 10.5 percent.  The pay gap widened over a ten year period with inflation rising by 28 percent while salaries rose by just 21.6 percent.

Between 2002 and 2012, the study showed only news directors (+35.9%), weathercasters ( (+37%), sports anchors (+28.6%), and assignment editors (+28.3%) beat the rise of inflation.  The biggest loser over the ten year period were web and mobile writers (+13.3%).  News assistants saw the largest drop (-3.1%) in pay between 2007 and 2012 compared to an inflation rate of 12 percent.

Click here to view the .pdf of the report.

[Variety]

News Director Peggy Phillip Exits KSHB

KSHB news director Peggy Phillip has left the Kansas City NBC-affiliate, Bottom Line Communications reports.

Phillip joined the station three years ago. She has previously been news director at WMAR in Baltimore, WSTM in Syracuse and WMC in Memphis. In 2009, she was named to the RTDNA Board of Directors. She began her television career at KTVN in Reno.

Phillip’s exit comes just a month after KSHB general manager Mike Vrabac announced his retirement.

[via Bottom Line Communications, Rick Gevers & Associates]

A Record Amount of TV News Last Year, Annual RTDNA Study Finds

The amount of news airing on local stations has risen for the fourth year in a row, according to Part II of the annual RTDNA-Hofstra University study. This year, the average is up 12 minutes to 5 hours, 30 minutes daily.

More than 45% of all television stations said they increased the amount of news in 2011. Only 1.5% of stations reduced the amount of news they run; a slim majority, 53%, said they ran the same amount of news in 2011 as they did in 2010. According to the study, Fox-affiliates were the most likely to have added news, followed by CBS-affiliates.

Additionally, 31% of stations plan to increase news in 2012. 60% plan to keep the same amount of news coverage, and 9% are not sure, the study says.

Part I of the study found that TV news staffing is way up, with more hiring expected. Read the full results of Part II after the jump. Read more

TV News Staffing Way Up, More Hiring Expected

Here’s some good news: TV news employment is soaring.

According to the annual RTDNA-Hofstra University survey on the state of TV news staffing and profitably, TV news employment is up to the second highest level ever and more hiring is expected over the next year.

The survey found that TV news added 1,131 jobs in 2011 to reach a total full-time employment tally of 27,653, representing a 4.3% gain over the previous year.  (The highest level of TV news staffing occurred in 2000). Read more

Here’s the List of 2012 Murrow Award Winners

The 2012 National Edward R. Murrow Award winners have been announced.

In the large market local TV categories, Minneapolis-St. Paul NBC-affiliate KARE took home a couple of awards. The Gannett-owned station won for “Video Reporting: Hard News” and reporter Boyd Huppert was honored in the “Writing” category.

In the small market categories, KCCI in Des Moines was awarded for “Overall Excellence” while its crosstown rival, WHO, won for “Video Feature Reporting.” New Orleans Fox-affiliate WVUE won two small market awards, including “Video Continuing Coverage” and “Video News Series.”

Full list of local winners inside… Read more

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