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Posts Tagged ‘Tamron Hall’

TVNewser Show Price Break Ends Tonight

tvnshowsmallIs Aereo the future of TV, or will it be shut down before it really takes off? Are drones a safer way to capture news from the sky? How are broadcasters adapting to Web TV? Are newsrooms diverse enough? Is social TV a complement or a distraction?

We’re less than three weeks to the TVNewser Show where we’ll ponder those questions and many more.

So join NBC News anchor Tamron Hall, Fox News anchor Bret Baier, Fusion anchor Alicia Menendez, Tribune Broadcasting president Larry Wert, NBC SVP Julian March, CNN VP Geraldine Moriba and many more on April 29. And if you sign up before midnight tonight, you’ll get $150 off the price at the door.

Check out the full program and speaker list for more details, and don’t forget to register today.

Mediabistro Course

Multimedia Journalism

Multimedia JournalismStarting September 25, learn how to create interactive packages with photos, audio, and video! Taught by a multiplatform journalist, Darragh Worland will teach you how to come up stories that would be best told in a multimedia format, and create original content for that package using photos, slideshows, and short video and audio pieces. Register now! 
 

Tamron Hall: There’s ‘Something Special About Covering News in a Smaller Community’

MSNBC anchor Tamron Hall is the subject of Mediabistro’s latest So What Do You Do? interview. Hall, who began her career as a general assignment reporter at KBTX in Bryan, Texas, reflects on how starting in a smaller market influenced her career path:

What important lessons did you glean from starting off in a smaller market before moving into the big time and how did it prepare you?
I think it was just a growth process. By the time I left Bryan, I’d had a chance to cover small town, local stories, so I had an opportunity to see how these stories impact someone’s life. On a national scale, obviously we’re playing to a broader audience, even though they say all stories are local. But there was something special about local news, especially in a smaller market where you got to know the individuals of that town. It’s a small town, so I could go to the gas station and everyone would have a story idea. Not that I go unrecognized now — people call all the time with story ideas — but if I look back at it in a nostalgic way, there was something special about covering news in a smaller community.

People Are Still Talking About Mitt Romney’s Standoff with Denver Reporter

In an interview on Wednesday in Colorado, Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney grew frustrated with KCNC reporter Shaun Boyd when she asked him a viewer’s question about medical marijuana (after she had pressed him on the issue of same-sex marriage).

Romney was still talking about the incident on Thursday and, on Friday afternoon, it was at the center of an on-air argument between MSNBC anchor Tamron Hall and Washington Examiner columnist Tim Carney (video above). Read more

Former WNBC Reporter Carol Anne Riddell Faces Backlash to Scandalous Wedding Announcement

The New York Times wedding announcement for former WNBC reporter-anchor Carol Anne Riddell is causing a stir online with commenters criticizing Riddell’s marriage and media columnists examining the origins of the article.

Riddell, who served as WNBC’s education reporter and Sunday evening anchor before being let go by the station in early 2009, married John Partilla, an advertising executive, in November and recently celebrated the union with a small ceremony at New York’s Mandarin Oriental hotel.  The New York Times covered the marriage in its regular Sunday “Vows” section.  What makes the NYT piece on Riddell’s marriage unique is that it tells the story of how she and Partilla broke up their respective marriages to be together.

As one commenter pointed out on the NYT website, “The notions of ‘Vows’ has a deliciously ironic depth of meaning here–the ones they made, but the ones they felt less compelled to honor.” Read more