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Aneya Fernando

Murray Olderman Talks About Becoming a Cartoonist

Murray-Olderman-DrawingMurray Olderman has had a storied career as a syndicated newspaper columnist and cartoonist. Although this 92-year-old is officially retired, he’s actually working on a new book, comprised of illustrations and cartoons of people in sports he’s known and drawn.

In our latest So What Do You Do column, we spoke with Olderman about journalism school in the 1940s, his most memorable interview and how he got started as a cartoonist:

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I was captivated as a teenager (when I was also writing sports for a county weekly) by the looks of cartoons on sports pages and started copying them, gradually perfecting my techniques through trial and error. I was first published in the Columbia Missourian, a city newspaper paper produced by the Missouri School of Journalism, in my junior year. My first hire, by the McClatchy Newspapers of Sacramento, was as a sports cartoonist. I have written and drawn conjunctively. No preference. A lot of guys have written sports. A lot of guys have drawn sports. Few have done both.

For more from Olderman, read: So What Do You Do, Murray Olderman, Iconic Sports Journalist and Cartoonist?

Pitching Professional Artist, ‘The Artist’s Guide to Making It’

prof-artist-304Professional Artist (formerly known as Art Calendar) has been a vital resource for visual artists since 1986. The mag differentiates itself from other art pubs with its focus on the business side of being an artist.

The pub has become the unofficial “artist’s guide to making it.” Packed with advice on everything from portfolio development and exhibit presentation to sales techniques, the pub is a vital resource for struggling artists. Oh, and the mag is 90 percent freelance written and on the lookout for new writers, too:

[Jannett Roberts, publisher] is open to pitches from all writers. “We have a dedicated crop of freelancers who are industry pros and successful working artists, but we are always looking for new voices and perspectives to fully represent the entrepreneurial art community,” Roberts says. Photo submissions are requested with editorial submissions. However, “We don’t typically accept stand-alone products,” Roberts says, adding that multimedia content can bolster a pitch.

To learn more about the pub, including what not to pitch, read: How To Pitch: Professional Artist.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Livingly Media to Upgrade Lonny

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In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do series, we interviewed Livingly Media’s VP of content, John Newlin. Newlin is in charge of three sites: Zimbio (pop culture), StyleBistro (fashion), and Lonny (interior design).

Lonny launched in October 2009 as a lifestyle and home decor online magazine. It includes DIY tips (one recent article: How To Make Your Own Throw Pillows), interviews with designers, and plenty of gorgeous photos for inspiration. And soon, Newlin revealed, readers can expect a major upgrade:

Right now, we’re redesigning Lonny. It was one of the first so-called “digital shelter” sites, offering PDFs of print publications. We’ve since moved away from that format of replicating magazine pages. Because of mobile, we’ve decided to change direction and build the next thing in this shelter category. On mobile phones, Lonny is hard to read. The new Lonny will launch this spring.

To learn more about Livingly Media, including how the company acquired more than 10 million photos for its archives, read: So What Do You Do, John Newlin, VP of Content at Livingly Media?

Eunique Jones Gibson on Expressing Her Passions with Photography

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Photographer Eunique Jones Gibson has used her craft to address societal issues, like the controversial Trayvon Martin verdict. In her latest thought-provoking photo campaign, Because of Them, We Can, children are depicted as African-American heroes, both past and present, as a way to inspire other young people of color.

Gibson went from an advertising account manager at Microsoft to professional photographer in a span of four years. During this time, she used every spare moment to perfect her skills. Here, Gibson shares some tips for those just starting out behind the lens:

Find your passion. “I had to try a number of things to figure out what I liked, from photographing models to shooting parties and events. I realized that wasn’t what I wanted to do. I love ‘love.’ Whether it’s a story about people falling in love, families in love or kids who exude love, that’s what I identify with. I also love being able to share my passion for social justice. That’s a niche carved through trial and error, so try different things to figure out what speaks to you.”

Identify what makes you unique. “Why are you different from all other photographers? There are enough to go around, so you need to carve out your own space, whether it’s how you light subjects or the angles that you shoot from or the type of focus that you have. Partner with other photographers so you can shadow them, but home in on something that makes you different from anyone else.”

For more from Gibson, including details on her plans to expand the “Because of Them” campaign, read: Hey, How’d You Launch an Inspirational Photography Campaign, Eunique Jones Gibson?

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.