Liquid Treat AgencySpy AdsoftheWorld BrandsoftheWorld LostRemote TVSpy TVNewser PRNewser FishbowlNY FishbowlDC 10,000 Words GalleyCat MediaJobsDaily

art

Visionaire Teams with John Baldessari, Samsung for ‘Celebrity Selfie’ Art Issue

dustin hoffman

blue visionaire“I’ll probably be most remembered for putting dots over people’s faces, so its funny to do an issue devoted to the selfies of famous people,” says John Baldessari, who has applied his signature “color interventions” to a suite of celebrity self-portraits for the latest issue of Visionaire. The sixty-fourth incarnation of the shape-shifting publication, creating in partnership with Samsung, is now available in three editions—Red, Green, and Blue—each with a distinct set of portraits tucked in a canvas-clad portfolio that folds out to become a display case. After meeting with Baldessari in his Venice Beach studio, Visionaire founders Cecilia Dean and James Kaliardos recruited the likes of Dustin Hoffman, Cameron Diaz, Miley Cyrus, Marina Abramovic, KAWS, Bill Cunningham, and Gisele Bündchen to contribute self-portraits that were printed in black and white and then altered with embossed shapes and colors created by Baldessari. The resulting images range from the exotic (as when a turbaned Lupita Nyong’o gains a second chapeau in a floating, noseless face) to the serene (the clasped hands of Ed Ruscha, amidst a yellow orb and swoosh of orange). “Now we live in an age of self-celebration and constant surveillance in which nearly everyone carries some form of camera,” notes Dean. “It seems ironic and hilarious that an artist so famous for putting dots over people’s faces would devote an issue to the technology that celebrates face-time.”
Read more

Mediabistro Course

Book Promotion and Publicity Boot Camp

Book Promotion and Publicity Boot CampDevelop a plan for your book's success in our online boot camp, Book Promotion & Publicity! Starting November 3, publishing and publicity experts will teach you the best practices for a successful book launch using various promotional techniques. Register now!

Vik Muniz Designs Perrier-Jouët Bottle

muniz
From left, Perrier-Jouët’s Cellar Master Hervé Deschamps and Vik Muniz.

pj vm bottleVik Muniz has demonstrated his range with raw materials that range from diamonds and caviar to dust and recyclables plucked from the world’s largest garbage dump. The Brazilian artist’s latest project returned him to the luxe end of the spectrum, via Art Nouveau flourishes and blush-hued bubbles. Muniz designed the bottle for the 2005 vintage of Perrier-Jouët’s Cuvée Belle Epoque Rosé. The limited edition, released this month, began as a scene crafted from scraps of gold: a dreamy meeting of a gilded hummingbird and the Perrier-Jouët anemone that has graced every Belle Epoque bottle for more than a century. The scene was photographed and applied by Muniz to the Belle Epoque bottle via a gold plate on which the hummingbird—seemingly, depending on how much of the salmon-hued wine one has consumed to that point—flies toward the anemones in the foreground. Notes the artist, “Much as Perrier-Jouët has long embraced Art Nouveau’s love of nature and enchantment, I took the idea of captivation in a natural setting as the inspiration for this motif.”

Watch: At Home with Pablo Bronstein

Why settle for an ordinary vacation home when you can have a “baroque event”? Frieze recently visited artist Pablo Bronstein—who you may recall from the mythical architectural history of the Metropolitan Museum of Art that he conjured in 2009—on the east coast of Kent, England, where he is embracing a “mid-century, slightly granny” aesthetic and the “pleasurable mess” of baroque architecture. “I think that it has no shame,” he says. “Baroque architecture does everything it possibly can to appeal, to amuse, to impress, to show off, to seem heavy or grand or important. It’s really sort of desperate architecture.” Watch Bronstein discuss art, architecture, taste, and the playful pathos of postmodernism.

Alison Bechdel, Rick Lowe Among 2014 MacArthur Fellows

mac14
(Courtesy of the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation)

Cartoonist and graphic memoirist Alison Bechdel (Fun Home, Are You My Mother?) and artist Rick Lowe (Project Row Houses) are among this year’s MacArthur fellows, the annual mix of thinkers, writers, artists, mathematicians, and materials scientists awarded $500,000 in no-strings-attached “genius grants” over five years. “Those who think creativity is dying should examine the life’s work of these extraordinary innovators who work in diverse fields and in different ways to improve our lives and better our world,” said MacArthur Fellows Program vice president Cecilia Conrad, in a statement issued today. “Together, they expand our view of what is possible, and they inspire us to apply our own talents and imagination.” Other 2014 fellows include documentary filmmaker Joshua Oppenheimer, translator and poet Khaled Mattawa, playwright Samuel D. Hunter, and computer scientist Craig Gentry. Meet all 21 MacArthur fellows here.
Read more

Quote of Note | Ryan McGinley

Ryan McGinley 2007
A 2007 work by Ryan McGinley.

“I love shooting at sand dunes because people can be at their most playful there, and everything that I was someone to do in a photo that you can do safely and really freely in sand dunes. I like them because of the spatial relationship—you can tell how big the people are and how big the dunes are. I also like them because it’s like blocks of color—ranging from really tan to really white. It’s in your DNA to act extremely childish and be really playful in that environment. You want to roll down them, you want to run around with your hands like you’re an airplane, you want to play tag, and just be free. You want to take your shoes off and feel the sand in your toes. That type of experience is sort of the essence of what I’m trying to capture in all of my photographs.”

-Artist Ryan McGinley in an interview in The Travel Almanac. “Yearbook,” an exhibition of McGinley’s work, is on view through October 12 at Team Gallery in New York.

Rock Star: Doug Pray on Levitated Mass, the Documentary

levitated mass

Michael Heizer is an artist whose work you tend to stumble upon—perhaps literally, in the case of the bewitching ribbons of rusting steel embedded in the lawn of the Menil Collection—and then can’t stop thinking about. He made headlines in recent years during the installation of Levitated Mass (2012), a 456-foot-long slot constructed on the campus of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA) campus, over which is placed a 340-ton granite megalith. That momentous, paperwork-laden process, which entailed a $10 million, 22-city tour for the boulder and its custom-made trailer, is the subject of a new film by Doug Pray (Art & Copy, Surfwise). Now playing in select cities, Levitated Mass weaves together Heizer’s biography, the dreams of a major museum, and the uniting of a city—all while proving that it is possible to make a fascinating film about a massive rock. Pray (pictured below), who happens to be the son of a geologist, made time between screenings to tell us more about the film and its making.

(Diana Rathe)How did you first encounter the work of Michael Heizer?
Long before I knew about the work of Michael Heizer I had seen Adjacent, Against, Upon on the waterfront in Seattle, and, like millions of others, I’d encountered the smaller, running-water version of Levitated Mass in New York City, but I didn’t swim in it, so to speak. My first full, immersive experience was during the early days of our production on Levitated Mass while we were endlessly awaiting for the rock to get its permits and approvals and to move out of the quarry. I drove out to Mormon Mesa, near Overton, Nevada—about an hour and a half northeast of Las Vegas—and spent a half day walking around and inside Heizer’s massive Double Negative.
Read more

Watch: On the Art and Craft of Art Forgery

art and craftWhen it comes to films about art forgers, woe betide the documentarian who attempts to top Orson Welles‘s delightfully gonzo F is for Fake (1973), which you can—and really should—watch in its mesmerizing entirety at the bottom of this post (what else are late summer afternoons for?). But the directorial trio of Sam Cullman, Jennifer Grausman, Mark Becker have quite the character in career art forger Mark Landis. After he dupes Matthew Leininger, the intrepid museum registrar will stop at nothing to expose the technically skilled fraudster. The cat-and-mouse game unfolds in Art and Craft, which has been burning up the festival circuit and opens in limited release next month (keep an eye out for showtimes here). Behold the trailer:


Read more

Maptastic! NYPL Labs Partners with Electric Objects on Net Artist Residency


An 1870 map of Long Island and the southern part of Connecticut. (Photo: NYPL)

It’s the stuff that dreams are made of: unfettered access to a collection of more than 20,000 historical maps and atlases, oodles of urban data dating from the 19th century (think old NYC building footprints and the equivalent of ye olde white and yellow pages), and your own dedicated patch of the New York Public Library to make sense—and art—out of it all. Such is the premise and promise of the Net Artist Residency program dreamed up by NYPL Labs, the New York Public Library’s in-house digital innovation team, and Electric Objects, emerging maker of nifty computers-cum-digital canvases to display digital images on your walls. The residency, created to “explore the creative possibilities of historical collections and the potential of the EO platform,” is open for applications through August 20. Start thinking in 1080 x 1920 pixels (the slightly goofy extruded-portrait orientation that is the native resolution of the EO1 prototype frame) and browsing NYPL maps for inspiration.

LACMA to Honor Barbara Kruger, Quentin Tarantino

(Barbara Kruger)Any number of lines from the films of Quentin Tarantino (perhaps the Pulp Fictional: “Just because you are a character doesn’t mean that you have character” or “Personality goes a long way”?) would look swell sprawled out in Futura Bold Italic by Barbara Kruger. The artist and the filmmaker will come together on November 1 at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art as the honorees of its 2014 Art+Film Gala, the museum announced today. Further upping the Gucci-backed fete’s cinematic koan quotient will be Leonardo DiCaprio, who is chairing the event with LACMA trustee Eva Chow.

In other exciting film-related LACMA news, the museum is prepping the first major retrospective of the work of Pierre Huyghe. The exhibition, which is being “designed as a single, extraordinary environment,” opens November 23.

Pictured: Barbara Kruger, Untitled (You Are A Very Special Person), 1995

Museum Masterpieces Head Outdoors with Art Everywhere’s U.S. Debut

Works by artists ranging from John Singleton Copley and Thomas Eakins to Jasper Johns and Cindy Sherman take to the streets this month with the launch of Art Everywhere U.S. Nancy Lazarus sizes up the coast-to-coast campaign that’s being billed as “the largest outdoor art show ever conceived.”

Art Everywhere Times Square Chuck Close Phil and Edward Hopper Nighthawks
Art Everywhere U.S. Times Square rendering, featuring Chuck Close’s Phil (1969) and Edward Hopper’s Nighthawks (1942).

Can’t make it to a museum this August? Fear not. The art is coming to you thanks to Art Everywhere U.S., an extensive outdoor art show highlighting the nation’s artistic heritage. Throughout the month, images of 58 selected U.S. artworks are being projected on billboards and public spaces such as buses, trains, airports, and movie theatres across the U.S. “This is an unconventional program to promote museum experiences and to encourage the discovery of art history so it becomes part of everyday life,” said Maxwell Anderson, director of the Dallas Museum of Art, at yesterday’s kickoff event. “The goal is to continue the enthusiasm every summer.”

Inspired by the success of the 2013 Art Everywhere UK campaign, Anderson enlisted the participation of four other major U.S. museums: New York’s Whitney Museum of American Art, Washington D.C.’s National Gallery of Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA). Aside from the five partnering museums, the Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA) was also instrumental in launching the initiative, which marks the organization’s largest public service campaign to date.
Read more

NEXT PAGE >>