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magazines

Now Read This: Codex, Journal of Letterforms

gastro

Summer reading alert! Font fans will delight in Codex, a journal-magazine hybrid “for people seriously in love with type.” Founded by writer, designer, and publisher John Boardley, the visually entrancing periodical celebrates and analyzes “the people, tools, and type associated with this craft, from the man carving beautiful cherubim into wood blocks in the 1400s to brilliantly formed modern interpretations and departures.” The latest issue includes a foldout of Gastrotypographicalassemblage (pictured) designed by Lou Dorfsman and Herb Lubalin for CBS.

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Mark Your Calendar: Dwell on Design L.A.

dwell on design

Just two weeks stand between you and Dwell on Design, a veritable feast of modern design in the form of thousands of products, oodles of presentations, modern home tours, and demonstrations galore. This year’s West Coast ideas- and inspiration-fest takes place June 20-22 at the Los Angeles Convention Center. Among the highlights in store is a keynote address by designer Stephen Burks, who will discuss his passion for craft and how to marry personal goals with marketable design, and a series of panels, including those that focus on designing L.A. The crew from Commune DesignPam Shamshiri, Ramin Shamshiri, Roman Alonso, and Steven Johanknecht—will take the stage to talk revitalization ranging from major residential multiuse projects to the recently opened Ace Hotel. And we hear that Coolhaus is whipping up a new treat, the Dwell ice cream sandwich, especially for the show. Ready to register? Save $5 on your show pass by entering the code: UNBEIGE.

Wanted: Art Director to Do a Capital Job

washingtonian mag coverThere’s more to Washington D.C. than monuments, symmetry, and Frank Underwood. Locals read all about it in the pages of Washingtonian, and as the magazine approaches its fiftieth anniversary is in want of a new art director for its flagship publication as well as the offshoots Washingtonian Bride & Groom, Washingtonian MOM, and Washingtonian Welcome Guide. Bring your strong editorial design experience, passion for magazines, and “the ability to balance multiple projects in a highly collaborative environment while problem-solving under tight deadlines.”

Learn more about and apply for this art director, Washingtonian magazine job or view all of the current mediabistro.com design/art/photo jobs.

Elle Décor Welcomes Pitches on Travel and Up-and-Coming Designers

Elle Décor, the magazine where style lives, takes the creativity of designers and artists from around the world and brings it into its readers homes. Articles focus on under-the-radar designers, artists just creating a name for themselves as well as new and interesting places to travel.

While the magazine limits the areas to which freelance writers can pitch, the “Talent” section is always open to writers who have their ear to the ground on an up-and-coming designer, artist or stylist. Another area to focus on is the magazine’s travel section. Features director Vicki Lowry invites more writers to pitch travel topics:

We are always looking for intriguing places to go and talented writers to cover it. They should really know a place: the right streets, the great shops, the best restaurants and hotels, the museums. They should be very cognizant of that particular area and know what they’re talking about.

For more about Elle Décor and what editors want from a writer, read: How to Pitch: Elle Décor.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Pitching Professional Artist, ‘The Artist’s Guide to Making It’

prof-artist-304Professional Artist (formerly known as Art Calendar) has been a vital resource for visual artists since 1986. The mag differentiates itself from other art pubs with its focus on the business side of being an artist.

The pub has become the unofficial “artist’s guide to making it.” Packed with advice on everything from portfolio development and exhibit presentation to sales techniques, the pub is a vital resource for struggling artists. Oh, and the mag is 90 percent freelance written and on the lookout for new writers, too:

[Jannett Roberts, publisher] is open to pitches from all writers. “We have a dedicated crop of freelancers who are industry pros and successful working artists, but we are always looking for new voices and perspectives to fully represent the entrepreneurial art community,” Roberts says. Photo submissions are requested with editorial submissions. However, “We don’t typically accept stand-alone products,” Roberts says, adding that multimedia content can bolster a pitch.

To learn more about the pub, including what not to pitch, read: How To Pitch: Professional Artist.

The full version of this article is exclusively available to Mediabistro AvantGuild subscribers. If you’re not a member yet, register now for as little as $55 a year for access to hundreds of articles like this one, discounts on Mediabistro seminars and workshops, and all sorts of other bonuses.

Comme des Garçons Collaborates with Raw Vision Magazine

raw vision coll

raw visionRaw Vision turns 25 this year, and the UK-based outsider art magazine is marking the quarter-century milestone in style: by collaborating with Comme des Garçons. As part of the partnership, which officially kicks off next month at the Outsider Art Fair in New York, Raw Vision has allowed Comme des Garçons to delve into its vast archive of images and layouts to create 20 to 30 mini-magazines that will be dispersed around the globe. Get a first taste of Rei Kawakubo and co’s picks on the Comme des Garçons website, which has been wallpapered with outsider art by the likes of Howard Finster and Anne Grgich.

Quote of Note | Lorin Stein

spring 14 issue“We don’t have pressure to publish anything, or to satisfy a million subscribers. We have the luxury of being able to follow our own sensibility, wherever it takes us, at whatever length, with whatever kind of content. We can publish things that are risqué, or would put some people off. Until recently a clothing chain was carrying the Review. They complained that there was too much nudity in our last issue; they said they trusted that it would never happen again. We sent them the proof for the next issue, which sure enough had some nude photos from Francesca Woodman and they cancelled their order forever. And no one shed a tear. That’s a luxury not every magazine has.”

-Lorin Stein, editor of The Paris Review, in an interview with Svbscription.

Livingly Media to Upgrade Lonny

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In the latest installment of Mediabistro’s So What Do You Do series, we interviewed Livingly Media’s VP of content, John Newlin. Newlin is in charge of three sites: Zimbio (pop culture), StyleBistro (fashion), and Lonny (interior design).

Lonny launched in October 2009 as a lifestyle and home decor online magazine. It includes DIY tips (one recent article: How To Make Your Own Throw Pillows), interviews with designers, and plenty of gorgeous photos for inspiration. And soon, Newlin revealed, readers can expect a major upgrade:

Right now, we’re redesigning Lonny. It was one of the first so-called “digital shelter” sites, offering PDFs of print publications. We’ve since moved away from that format of replicating magazine pages. Because of mobile, we’ve decided to change direction and build the next thing in this shelter category. On mobile phones, Lonny is hard to read. The new Lonny will launch this spring.

To learn more about Livingly Media, including how the company acquired more than 10 million photos for its archives, read: So What Do You Do, John Newlin, VP of Content at Livingly Media?

Wanted: Designer with Good Taste

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Are you a die-hard Top Chef fan? Do you have strong views about “flavor profiles”? Were you able to enjoy Julie & Julia without becoming distracted by the hideous costume choices for the Julie character? Then clear your plate for this job opportunity: the epicureans over at Food & Wine are looking for a new cook—and by cook, we mean editorial production assistant—to join their New York-based team. Ingredients of a successful candidate include two cups of “proficiency in InDesign, Photoshop, Acrobat, Bridge, and Microsoft Office,” one cup of solid editorial production experience, and two heaping tablespoons of technical curiosity, all sprinkled with an abiding faith in squash. Interested in user experience and evolving digital production processes? That’s icing on the Black Sesame Chocolate-Banana Loaf Cake.

Pack your knives and apply for this production assistant (design/editorial), Food & Wine job or view all current mediabistro.com design/art/photo jobs.

David Rockwell Brings NYC to LA in Oscars Greenroom

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How do you luxe up a windowless room in the bowels of Hollywood’s Dolby Theatre? Architectural Digest poses this question to one designer each year as it creates a backstage lounge for the Oscars. The task of creating the AD Greenroom (the 12th!) for the 2014 Academy Awards (the 86th!) went to David Rockwell. Having perhaps exhausted his interest in Hollywood Regency and cinema magic through his work on the on-stage proceedings, Rockwell looked to New York City loft living as inspiration.

Faced with the equivalent of a basement studio, he focused on “urban simplicity, but married with film glamour.” The latter came in part from actress Susan Sarandon, who helped select works from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences archive that line the walls: on one side, a wall of screens powered by Rockwell LAB software display digital images from socially conscious, Oscar-winning, and Oscar-nominated films, while on the other side, 14 framed works features images from classic screwball comedies—one of Sarandon’s favorite genres.

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